Tuesday, January 10

The Debunker: Was the QWERTY Keyboard Designed to Slow Down Typists?

by Ken Jennings

January 1, 2017 isn't just New Year's Day… it's also the Internet's 34rd birthday. On January 1, 1983, all the computer systems on the ARPANET, created by the Department of Defense in 1969, were required to switch over to the TCP/IP network protocol that it still uses today, giving birth to the Internet as we know it. But how well do we know it? Onetime computer programmer (and Jeopardy! computer victim) Ken Jennings is here to do a complete systems update on all the Digital Age spam in your mental inbox.

The Debunker: Was the QWERTY Keyboard Designed to Slow Down Typists?

Look at the keyboard on your computer or mobile device. Whose idea was this random jumble of letters? Why not put the alphabet in the A-Z order that all beginning typists already know, or, if you're more interested in speed than ease of use, why not put the most common letters on the "home" finger keys? It seems crazy that someone wanted it to be easier to type an uncommon letter like 'J' or 'K' (the home positions of the strongest fingers of the right hand) than to reach for the 'O,' 'E', or 'N', right?

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Monday, January 09

Music Monday: Bowie, One Year On

by Scott Lydon


Happy Music Monday! Roughly one year ago today, the wonderful David Bowie passed away. Today Scott's recapping with some tributes that happened across the world as we all came to terms with the loss.

The Brit Awards

 

If you could only pick one tribute, this would be it. Featuring Bowie's friends, Bowie's touring band, and an up-and-coming artist the man himself called the future of British music, it was as close to a funeral as a Bowie fan could want. And how moving to just let the vocals be so loud in their absence.

We got more, coming up. Then hit up our Facebook page and see if you can win a Blackstar vinyl.

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Saturday, January 07

 

Friday, January 06

 

Thursday, January 05

 

Wednesday, January 04

 

Tuesday, January 03

The Debunker: Was a Moth in a Navy Computer the First "Bug"?

by Ken Jennings

January 1, 2017 isn't just New Year's Day… it's also the Internet's 34rd birthday. On January 1, 1983, all the computer systems on the ARPANET, created by the Department of Defense in 1969, were required to switch over to the TCP/IP network protocol that it still uses today, giving birth to the Internet as we know it. But how well do we know it? Onetime computer programmer (and Jeopardy! computer victim) Ken Jennings is here to do a complete systems update on all the Digital Age spam in your mental inbox.

The Debunker: Was a Moth in a Navy Computer the First "Bug"?

Grace Hopper was one of the greatest computer pioneers of the 20th century. "Amazing Grace" was a math whiz with a Ph.D from Yale who joined the Naval Reserve during World War II and worked on the early computers that made the Manhattan Project possible. After the war, she helped create UNIVAC, America's first commercial computer; wrote the first compiler in history; and was instrumental in developing early programming languages like COBOL and FORTRAN. By the time she retired from the Navy in 1986, she had achieved the rank of Rear Admiral. Last November, President Obama posthumously awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

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