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quality posts: 15 Private Messages WootBot

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Breville Juice Fountains - Your Choice

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wootstalkerbot


quality posts: 13 Private Messages wootstalkerbot

[Preview 1][Preview 2][Preview 3][Preview 4][Preview 5][Preview 6][Preview 7]


Breville Juice Fountains - Your Choice
Price: $79.99 - 119.99
Shipping Options: $5 Standard OR $18 Two-Day OR $21 One-Day
Shipping Estimates: Ships in 1-2 business days (Monday, Mar 03 to Tuesday, Mar 04) + transit
Condition: Factory Reconditioned

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tracylee


quality posts: 5 Private Messages tracylee

I love love love my Juice Fountain! Very easy to use and clean. I regularly juice carrots, celery, ginger and a lime or lemon. I've also done oranges and pomegranates for a yummy juice.

conanthelibrarian


quality posts: 3807 Private Messages conanthelibrarian

Let's check out the product page for the JE98XL



and

Let's check out the product page for the BJE510XL

lichme


quality posts: 3125 Private Messages lichme

Here are a ton of reviews from Macys

timmyboy1


quality posts: 2 Private Messages timmyboy1

Picked up the 2-speed JE98XL Juice Fountain Plus on a previous woot offering, same price. If works fantastically, and clean up isn't too terrible.
It wil extract juice and discharge the pulp so quickly that sometimes I feel like it's not extracting all it can, and I will run the pulp through it a second time.
It's a great juicer for the price- no regrets!

Tim

X 4

DaZoneRanger


quality posts: 45 Private Messages DaZoneRanger

Having gone through a number of juicers, my recommendation would be to get the one with the stainless steel feed tube. Maybe I'm just rough on my juicers, but I've had more than one plastic feed tube crack on the top and even somehow get mysteriously juice up by the blades (on the bottom, obviously). I'm sure either one of these will do the same task with equal efficiently, but for durability's sake, I think the one with the stainless feed tube is the better option. I have the juice fountain elite which has a stainless feed tube and a stainless bottom part (the part where the juice flows) and the stainless feed tube really gives me piece of mind when I'm shoving and stuffing the tube with juiceables.

elangomatt


quality posts: 11 Private Messages elangomatt

Of the 6 juicers they reviewed during season 13, America's Test Kitchen rated the Breville JE98XL as highly recommended (the only one of the 6 to get that rating). They didn't test the RM-JE98XL for some reason.

I purchased this a while back from woot and it works great. Cleanup isn't too terrible, especially if you line the pulp bucket with an old plastic grocery bag. It does seem like it leaves some juice unextracted but I don't think it is too terrible.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100

We've had one for a few years and this is as good as a centrifugal juicer can get. Every piece was thoughtfully desgned. For example, the plug features a donut ring design (see 3rd Woot photo), making plugging and unplugging easier and safer. It also has fewer crevices than other models we looked into. That makes cleaning easier. The large chute and locking arm has been copied a lot, but Breville's design seems seems better than others. Not having to cut mostfruits is an incredible time saver. Whether it's the powerful motor or the blade, this juicer does seem to extract more juice, and at a faster rate, than other models. The resulting pulp is incredible dry. We use vegetable pulp to make soup and mix the fruit pulp into other foods, i.e. yogurt or oatmeal. The froth separator works reasonably well but we don't mind froth.

We rarely use the slow speed because we generally puree soft fruits in the blender. We also prefer to juice citrus fruits in a traditional citrus juicer to avoid the bitterness of the pith and rind. And of course, soft leafy vegetables, i.e. spinach, are harder to juice centrifugally. All told, if you want a centrifugal juicer, the Breville is probably the best one available for home use. In fact, I've even seen it in diners and other commercial places.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
elangomatt wrote:Of the 6 juicers they reviewed during season 13, America's Test Kitchen rated the Breville JE98XL as highly recommended (the only one of the 6 to get that rating). They didn't test the RM-JE98XL for some reason.

I purchased this a while back from woot and it works great. Cleanup isn't too terrible, especially if you line the pulp bucket with an old plastic grocery bag. It does seem like it leaves some juice unextracted but I don't think it is too terrible.



Bagging is great advice. If you want to keep the pulp, like we do, use a clean baggie instead of a grocery bag. In fact, we use a large washable ziploc bag.

The best cleaning advice I can give is to clean the micromesh filter immediately. Otherwise, the pulp will dry, making cleaning difficult later. But if you're rushing off to work and don't have time, simply submerge the parts in water so that the pulp won't dry onto the parts. Using soapy water is even better. Then clean as soon as you can. Using very hot water helps melt the gummy starches, making cleaning easy.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100

I'm confused by the 6th photo. It shows a relatively small apple being larger than the chute. That conflicts with one the best features of the Breville -- namely, that the chute is so wide that you drop in whole fruits. As an owner, I can verify that the feature is a time saver. While I apreciate honesty (the chute is 3"-3.3"), why would Breville and/or Woot post a photo discrediting this feature? If I was in the marketing department, I'd just omit that photo.

From the Description:

...this juicer features an extra-wide 3-inch feeder chute that accommodates large chunks or entire pieces of fruit or vegetables, eliminating the need for chopping vegetables

Patented 3.3" (84mm) feed chute size with cutting knife can process whole fruits


spun4621


quality posts: 3 Private Messages spun4621

I'm pretty close to getting one of these. But can I ask all of you that currently juice, do you find its more expensive to make your own juice? Produce costs seem to be going up everyday.

Its obvious that the health benefits of 100% fruit only juice are greater than the store bought kool-aid sugar juice, but I'm wondering what the costs look like to make your own.
(i.e. - a small package (a pint, maybe) of blueberries is at least $4 here.

Thanks for any input!

dsmania


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dsmania
spun4621 wrote:I'm pretty close to getting one of these. But can I ask all of you that currently juice, do you find its more expensive to make your own juice? Produce costs seem to be going up everyday.

Its obvious that the health benefits of 100% fruit only juice are greater than the store bought kool-aid sugar juice, but I'm wondering what the costs look like to make your own.
(i.e. - a small package (a pint, maybe) of blueberries is at least $4 here.

Thanks for any input!





Good question. It really depends on what you're juicing. Organic apples at Whole Foods probably don't make a lot of sense if you can find organic apple juice at Trader Joes for a few bucks. I've found that it makes sense with carrots, ginger, beets, and a lot of citrus.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
spun4621 wrote:I'm pretty close to getting one of these. But can I ask all of you that currently juice, do you find its more expensive to make your own juice? Produce costs seem to be going up everyday.

Its obvious that the health benefits of 100% fruit only juice are greater than the store bought kool-aid sugar juice, but I'm wondering what the costs look like to make your own.
(i.e. - a small package (a pint, maybe) of blueberries is at least $4 here.

Thanks for any input!



Juicing is definitely expensive, especially now. I usually get my fruits in NYC's Chinatown, where produce is usually cheaper (i.e. carrots are $0.39-$0.79/lb). But even there, apples are now about 3 for $3. As a result, I've juiced much less in the past few months. And with the drought in California, prices will only go up. I believe 50%+ of US produce is grown there.

As for other fruits, I can get strawberries for about $0.99-$1.50 a pint in the Summer, and blueberries for about $1.50-$2.50. Being Winter, it's much more now. Produce can cost less if you belong to a collective, or have access to a Farmer's market. I generally purée berries in a blender instead of juicing. That way, there is no waste. As for apples and oranges, I use as much of the pulp as I can, i.e. for baking and in yogurt. Vegetable pulp is mixed into meatloaf or put into soups.

Because I save the pulp, I can justify the higher cost of juicing. But if I simply want a glass of apple or orange juice, it's MUCH cheaper to buy a carton at the supermarket. Especially if you want blends, i.e. peach-mango-orange, pomegranate-blueberry-apple. Then again, if you want really weird blends, especially with vegetables, juicing may be the only option.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
spun4621 wrote:I'm pretty close to getting one of these. But can I ask all of you that currently juice, do you find its more expensive to make your own juice? Produce costs seem to be going up everyday.

Its obvious that the health benefits of 100% fruit only juice are greater than the store bought kool-aid sugar juice, but I'm wondering what the costs look like to make your own.
(i.e. - a small package (a pint, maybe) of blueberries is at least $4 here.

Thanks for any input!



As for health, don't believe all the hype. There simply is no proven benefit to juicing over store brought juice. Pasteurization will not significantly destroy nutrients, and will, in fact, protect you from microbes. It does affect the taste of orange juice though so I prefer mine freshly juiced.

All the health claims of juicing compares juicers to those who eat few vegetables. Of course, ingesting fruits and vegetables is healthier than not doing so -- but it doesn't prove the benefits of juicing. In fact, eating whole produce with all the insoluble fiber is healthier than just drinking the juice.

Juicing is advantageous because you can ingest it on the go, and it's easier to digest. Digestability, however, is a double-edged sword. It gives you an immediate sugar rush, which is not good for diabetics and pre-diabetics. Making things worse, juicing eliminates the insoluble fiber, which can control hunger by filling the stomach.

Many juicers also remove the skin for hygienic reasons. That's good advice when eating raw produce if you can't guarantee that the skin is free of microbes and chemicals. However, many of the beneficial phytochemicals and antioxidants are in the skin, i.e. the benefits of red wine comes from the skin of grapes. So, if at all possible, keep the skin. This is especially true if you're cooking, since heat will destroy any microbes on the skin.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100

Here's a hint:
Heating many fruits briefly in the microwave or boiling water can improve juice yield. In addition, the boiling water can destroy microbes on the skin. By briefly, I mean about 30 secs-1 min or so, so that the fruit is barely warm. This advice is especially helpful when using a traditional citrus juicer. That said, these Breville centrifugal juicers are already so effective that heating may not improve things.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100

Many people are put off by a reconditioned juicer. I had no qualms getting one because they're sterilized before leaving the factory. In fact, most parts are replaced with new ones. Considering that you're using used utensils at a restaurant, and their appliances and cookware are no cleaner than reconditioned, what's the hangup? Fact is, all germs die within a few days in a dry environment. Furthermore, recondition does not necessarily mean used. They could be opened or damaged box items that need to be examined and repackaged for sale.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100

You can clean the screen more easily by:
1) Cleaning it immediately after juicing with the brush Otherwise, the pulp will dry up and stick on the screen.
2) Submerging the screen in soapy water if you can't clean immediately.
3) Using VERY hot water to melt the gummy starches in fruits and vegetables. Not sure if it can withstand boiling water though so be careful.
4) Turning the machine on and pour VERY hot soapy water down the chute. The centrifugal action forces the hot soapy water through the holes of the mesh. Make sure you have a container in the opening to catch the water.

celeste91784


quality posts: 8 Private Messages celeste91784
sdc100 wrote:You can clean the screen more easily by:
1) Cleaning it immediately after juicing with the brush Otherwise, the pulp will dry up and stick on the screen.
2) Submerging the screen in soapy water if you can't clean immediately.
3) Using VERY hot water to melt the gummy starches in fruits and vegetables. Not sure if it can withstand boiling water though so be careful.
4) Turning the machine on and pour VERY hot soapy water down the chute. The centrifugal action forces the hot soapy water through the holes of the mesh. Make sure you have a container in the opening to catch the water.



The reason i got rid of my Breville juicier was that cleaning the screen was a horrible time consuming task. There were also so many parts to clean. I now have a high speed Vitamix and make smoothies combining fruits and veggies. It's a breeze to clean.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
celeste91784 wrote:The reason i got rid of my Breville juicier was that cleaning the screen was a horrible time consuming task. There were also so many parts to clean. I now have a high speed Vitamix and make smoothies combining fruits and veggies. It's a breeze to clean.



That's surprising since the Breville is recognized as one of the easiest centrifugal juicers to clean. Except for the mesh filter, you merely have to rinse the other parts with hot water. Soap isn't even necessary unless you use oily vegetables. I I often don't even scrub. A high pressure stream of hot water is enough.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
celeste91784 wrote:The reason i got rid of my Breville juicier was that cleaning the screen was a horrible time consuming task. There were also so many parts to clean. I now have a high speed Vitamix and make smoothies combining fruits and veggies. It's a breeze to clean.



That's an unfair comparison since the Vitamix is not a juicer. It's an overpriced blender that should be compared with other blenders. Even the Vitamix website calls their appliances, blenders. As such, it's no easier to clean than other blenders. And you can a 600-800 watt for less than $100 than can perform just as well as the Vitamix for making smoothies.

I work with a dietitcian who has actually compared the Vitamix with quality blenders (and juicers). There was little difference in speed and smoothness of the resulting purée, or nutritional value. In fact, they even make blenders optimized for smoothies, such as the $68 Hamilton Beach 56221 Smoothie Smart Blender. Some also have spigots for dispensing the smoothie as well as a built-in wand to scrape ingredients off the sides.

As for juicing, the Vitamix doesn't even come close. Try putting three apples in the Vitamix and three apples in this. Strain out the pulp and see which gives you more juice. An even better demo is carrot juice. The Vitamix is incapable of separating the juice from the pulp. That's why every Vitamix recipe for carrot "juice" calls for water, to give the illusion of juice. This official recipe calls for 1/2 cup water and 1 cup ice! What you end up with is no longer 100% juice, thus less nutritious and tasty than 100% juice (most of the nutrients are in the juice, not the insoluble fiber that makes up the pulp). If you want purée or smoothies, use a Vitamix or a more reasonably-priced blender. If you want juice, use a masticating or centrifugal juicer such as this Breville.

patric9956


quality posts: 7 Private Messages patric9956
sdc100 wrote:That's an unfair comparison since the Vitamix is not a juicer. It's an overpriced blender that should be compared with other blenders. Even the Vitamix website calls their appliances, blenders. As such, it's no easier to clean than other blenders. And you can a 600-800 watt for less than $100 than can perform just as well as the Vitamix for making smoothies.



Having burnt up a few blenders in my 54 yrs on this rock making pumpkin pies, I can attest the Vitamix is built like a tank and worth every penny. I have destroyed kitchenaids, cusinarts, warings, and many a sub $100 walmart special in making my pies. The Vitamix takes a licking and keeps on blending. Sometimes you just have to bite the bullet, cause life is too short for using shoddy tools. Interestingly, enough Cooks seems to agree with me. For value Breville makes a decent product.



reboog


quality posts: 0 Private Messages reboog

Here is an article on the difference between Centrifugal Juice Extractors (What Woot is offering today) and Cold Press Juicers:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/08/juicer-types-cold-press_n_2618000.html

Supposedly, the heat of the blade in a Centrifugal Juicer can destroy nutrients.

niftyfifty


quality posts: 14 Private Messages niftyfifty

If you're not a procrastinator, the juicer is easy to clean. I've had mine (the smaller version) for over 2 years now and bought it for $150, which was a bargain at the time. I also own a Vita Mix, and they are very different...one's a blender, one's a juicer...I use them both. It's the same juicer that's featured in the movie, "Fat, Sick, and Nearly Dead". If you haven't seen it yet, watch it instantly on Netflix or Amazon. There's some motivation for you....

blondie2669


quality posts: 1 Private Messages blondie2669

I bought the multi speed last year and absolutely love it!. It is very easy to clean as long as it is done right away. It takes 2 minutes and your'e done. This baby will eat up whatever you feed it!

michoutdoors


quality posts: 6 Private Messages michoutdoors

If you want to spend a fortune on fruits and vegetables with little nutritional upside to your diet, buy a juicer. If you want the benefits of whole fruit and vegetable juicing, buy a Vitamix. Nothing is wasted and EVERYTHING is turned to juice. There is no comparison between the Vitamix and any "blender" found at your local Target, etc. NONE. Look in most professional kitchens and bars and you will find Vitamix. You get what you pay for. Period

sdc100 wrote:That's an unfair comparison since the Vitamix is not a juicer. It's an overpriced blender that should be compared with other blenders. Even the Vitamix website calls their appliances, blenders. As such, it's no easier to clean than other blenders. And you can a 600-800 watt for less than $100 than can perform just as well as the Vitamix for making smoothies.

I work with a dietitcian who has actually compared the Vitamix with quality blenders. There was little difference in speed and smoothness of the resulting purée, or nutritional value. In fact, they even make blenders optimized for smoothies, such as the $68 Hamilton Beach 56221 Smoothie Smart Blender. Some also have spigots for dispensing the smoothie as well as a built-in wand to scrape ingredients off the sides.

As for juicing, the Vitamix doesn't even come close. Try putting three apples in the Vitamix and three apples in this. Strain out the pulp and see which gives you more juice. An even better demo is carrot juice. The Vitamix is incapable of separating the juice from the pulp. That's why every Vitamix recipe for carrot "juice" calls for water, to give the illusion of juice. This official recipe calls for 1/2 cup water and 1 cup ice! What you end up with is no longer 100% juice, thus less nutritious and tasty than 100% juice (most of the nutrients are in the juice, not the insoluble fiber that makes up the pulp). If you want purée or smoothies, use a Vitamix or a more reasonably-priced blender. If you want juice, use a masticating or centrifugal juicer such as this Breville.



michoutdoors


quality posts: 6 Private Messages michoutdoors

Furthermore, if you are going to make a claim about performance, try owning and using the product first. Your statement below shows you know nothing about nutrition nor the Vitamix. And if you have a dietician, you obviously don't have a nutritional clue (and apparently, neither does your dietician). The purpose of the Vitamix is not to extract the sugar laden juice. It gives you the whole carrot, cabbage, beet, apple, etc. in juice form. Wootsperts (Self-proclaimed Woot experts) like you are a menace to good health and common sense.

"As for juicing, the Vitamix doesn't even come close. Try putting three apples in the Vitamix and three apples in this. Strain out the pulp and see which gives you more juice. An even better demo is carrot juice. The Vitamix is incapable of separating the juice from the pulp. That's why every Vitamix recipe for carrot "juice" calls for water, to give the illusion of juice."

gogododo


quality posts: 1 Private Messages gogododo

Bought one of these off amazon a month or so ago. Love it. I feel like an alchemist when i have everything splayed out in my kitchen to juice.

If you do get one, pick up some small brushes for cleaning the spout and smaller areas. Otherwise it's a really nice unit.

G

gogododo


quality posts: 1 Private Messages gogododo
sdc100 wrote:That's an unfair comparison since the Vitamix is not a juicer. It's an overpriced blender that should be compared with other blenders. Even the Vitamix website calls their appliances, blenders. As such, it's no easier to clean than other blenders. And you can a 600-800 watt for less than $100 than can perform just as well as the Vitamix for making smoothies.

I work with a dietitcian who has actually compared the Vitamix with quality blenders. There was little difference in speed and smoothness of the resulting purée, or nutritional value. In fact, they even make blenders optimized for smoothies, such as the $68 Hamilton Beach 56221 Smoothie Smart Blender. Some also have spigots for dispensing the smoothie as well as a built-in wand to scrape ingredients off the sides.

As for juicing, the Vitamix doesn't even come close. Try putting three apples in the Vitamix and three apples in this. Strain out the pulp and see which gives you more juice. An even better demo is carrot juice. The Vitamix is incapable of separating the juice from the pulp. That's why every Vitamix recipe for carrot "juice" calls for water, to give the illusion of juice. This official recipe calls for 1/2 cup water and 1 cup ice! What you end up with is no longer 100% juice, thus less nutritious and tasty than 100% juice (most of the nutrients are in the juice, not the insoluble fiber that makes up the pulp). If you want purée or smoothies, use a Vitamix or a more reasonably-priced blender. If you want juice, use a masticating or centrifugal juicer such as this Breville.



I use a Breville and a nutribullet. Sometimes a smoothie is nice, but sometimes juice is preferred. One for filling the other for energy...

dowhatudo202


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dowhatudo202

I have the JE version. It works well for me. No complaints. I never know what to do with the pulp though, so I just throw it in the yard as "compost"

dphuga


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dphuga

Does the refurbed BJE510XL come with all the original components? Any gadgets missing from new-in-box?

mjstark1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mjstark1

I've had a Breville RM-JE98XL since September of last year. The thing worked great in the beginning and then after about two months it started to leak and hasn't stopped. When I say it leaks, I don't just mean leaking down the side of the unit. The thing has a tendency to spray juice everywhere, usually when I'm juicing beets for some reason. I followed all the recommendations on Breville's site for cleaning the filter basket and it hasn't helped. I thought that perhaps I had gotten a defective unit but a friend of mine has the same model and after only a couple of months of owning it she too is having the same issues that I am. I would not recommend this juicer unless you enjoy your kitchen walls and counter tops being covered in juice.

JulieKid


quality posts: 3 Private Messages JulieKid

We bought the Multi-Speed in December and have been enjoying using it.

Juice: It produces juice. It produces a lot of froth, too, but we've never had a juicer that didn't create froth. It does warm the juice up a bit, which seems to be a big deal for some ultra-juicers. Definitely helps to refrigerate the fruit overnight before juicing it.

The pulp that comes out is definitely not completely dry. We don't put it back through the juicer, but maybe we should.

The chute is very large. That picture that shows an apple not fitting in--that would have to be a pretty darn big apple. I can easily get a half grapefruit in there, probably a whole grapefruit. A medium-sized grapefruit.

Cleaning: This thing cleans like a dream. It's almost like the pieces are coated in Teflon (although I hope that they are not). All you have to do is run hot water over them till you don't see any more pulp pieces stuck. It's harder to clean the basket, of course, but the basket on this one cleans a lot easier (with a brush) than the basket on an old model of the Breville, which is what we used to have. We do use a plastic bag for the pulp catcher, and then we compost the pulp.

Fruit: We live in Iowa, and fruit quality is a real problem here most of the year. It's great to be all excited about fresh juice and its health benefits, whatever, but the reality is that you have to have deliciously fresh fruit to make juice that tastes as full-bodied as store-bought juice. And we just don't get that in Iowa, even between May and October when the farmer's markets are open. And yes, produce prices are ridiculously high right now. There's also the problem that you need a large quantity of produce to make more than a couple of glasses of juice. So you're buying 12 oranges or grapefruits or whatever, and you're in for $5-10 for a few glasses of juice, and you really can't tell from looking at the outside of the fruit if it's good or not. That's difficult for me, the fruit quality crapshoot.

dougtaylor1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dougtaylor1
elangomatt wrote:Of the 6 juicers they reviewed during season 13, America's Test Kitchen rated the Breville JE98XL as highly recommended (the only one of the 6 to get that rating). They didn't test the RM-JE98XL for some reason.



Probably because the RM is ReManufactured.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
michoutdoors wrote:Furthermore, if you are going to make a claim about performance, try owning and using the product first. Your statement below shows you know nothing about nutrition nor the Vitamix. And if you have a dietician, you obviously don't have a nutritional clue (and apparently, neither does your dietician). The purpose of the Vitamix is not to extract the sugar laden juice. It gives you the whole carrot, cabbage, beet, apple, etc. in juice form. Wootsperts (Self-proclaimed Woot experts) like you are a menace to good health and common sense.

"As for juicing, the Vitamix doesn't even come close. Try putting three apples in the Vitamix and three apples in this. Strain out the pulp and see which gives you more juice. An even better demo is carrot juice. The Vitamix is incapable of separating the juice from the pulp. That's why every Vitamix recipe for carrot "juice" calls for water, to give the illusion of juice."



Er, read carefully. I never said I had a dietician. I said I worked with a dietician -- a PhD -- who actually did a comparison. For the record, I am a medical researcher who worked with the dietician on a study on HIV wasting. And she compared her Vitamix with my Breville and an Omega masticating juicer, as well as other blenders. She used actual actual chemical analysis of the juices. So what comparisons have you made? What's your academic background? As for not knowing anything about nutrition, tell you what. Let's compare the medical studies I've done with the ones you've done -- including two on nutrition. PM me if you care to take the challenge.

You really need to read carefully. I clearly said that the Vitamix produced good purée and smoothie -- like any good blender -- but if juicing is your goal, get a real juicer. Read the part you quoted. I clearly said that the Breville yielded more juice. Do you disagree? I even gave you an exact experiment to try. And don't tell me what "the point" of the Vitamix is because I know very well what a blender does. I have a 900 watt one at home and an industrial one at the lab that can blow your Vitamix away. But the point of this Woot is juicing, not what a Vitamix does.

Seriously, if you're going to disagree with me, first read carefully. Then don't make assumptions. And do some research. A bit of civility would also help.

escalante


quality posts: 8 Private Messages escalante
sdc100 wrote:Juicing is advantageous because you can ingest it on the go, and it's easier to digest. Digestability, however, is a double-edged sword. It gives you an immediate sugar rush, which is not good for diabetics and pre-diabetics. Making things worse, juicing eliminates a lot of the fiber, which has been shown to help control blood sugar.


Easy solution (well at least for me), use a blender and only eat vegetables low in sugar.

I have juiced for over 40 years and owned several types of juicers. I purchased a Breville Juice Fountain Plus 10-15 years ago when they were new, unknown, and only available at specialty online sites. I had read that they were the best juicer and in my opinion after using one I would have to agree (at that time). It did a great job at juicing, easy to clean up, easy to use, etc.

That said I sold the Breville many years ago and started blending. I find for my use blending is better and much easier, and you get the whole vegetable with the insoluble fiber (which I hear helps in many ways; digestion, sugar control, health, etc.).

A lot of people that say they cannot eat raw (or cooked) vegetables because it causes stomach upset find that they can eat raw vegetables that have been blended. I guess it is because the blender does the chewing for you, breaking the vegetables down to a cellular level (or so they say). I can eat a large amount of raw vegetables every day with no problems.

sdc100


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michoutdoors wrote:If you want to spend a fortune on fruits and vegetables with little nutritional upside to your diet, buy a juicer. If you want the benefits of whole fruit and vegetable juicing, buy a Vitamix. Nothing is wasted and EVERYTHING is turned to juice. There is no comparison between the Vitamix and any "blender" found at your local Target, etc. NONE. Look in most professional kitchens and bars and you will find Vitamix. You get what you pay for. Period



First of all, professional kitchens use their blenders a lot more than most homes so they pay for the build and longevity That doesn't prove it's any more capable. A professional kitchen also has $3000 ovens. Do you recommend that for most homes?

Second, I challenge you to produce a single peer-reviewed study showing that the Vitamix produces a more nutritious juice than a $100 800 watt blender or a good centrifugal or masticating juicer. Go ahead, I dare you. You can't simply because it's not true. While you accuse me of nutritional ignorance, you don't seem to know what fiber is. Juicing retains all the SOLUBLE fiber which has all the health benefits, i.e. lowering cholesterol, preventing cancer, lowering blood sugar, etc. It's the gummy substance that gives juice its body, and what Metamucil is made of. The fiber left in the pulp is INSOLUBLE fiber, which has very little nutritional value. Its main benefit is helping move waste through the intestines. It is NOT digestible, no matter how small you grind it, thus no nutrition is gained from it.

So tell me, how does your Vitamix "turn everything into juice" where there is no juice in the INSOLUBLE fibrous pulp? And what additional nutrients are in that INSOLUBLE pulp that is left in the Vitamix purée in any significant amount? Please provide a scientific reference. Finally, tell me how your Vitamix is nutritionally superior to eating the pulp as I do. As I posted, I put it into meatloaf, yogurt, cakes, etc. Do you even have that CHOICE with the Vitamix? Or are you against people having the choice of whether to drink pure juice, eating purée, baking with pulp, etc? With the Vitamix, you have no choice except to drink pulpy diluted "juice."

I eagerly await your references proving the nutritional superiority of a Vitamix over a good centrifugal or masticating juicer --- or even a good 600-800 watt blender. Furthermore, please give me epidemiological study showing that Vitamix users have lower morbidity and mortality rates than non-Vitamix juicers. Since health is obviously your main priority, surely you have such studies, right?

sdc100


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gogododo wrote:I use a Breville and a nutribullet. Sometimes a smoothie is nice, but sometimes juice is preferred. One for filling the other for energy...



Ditto. Different machines perform different tasks which is why I'm saddened when people confuse a Vitamix blender with juicers. I have a Breville for juicing and a 900 watt blender for purées and smoothies. Furthermore, I also have a citrus juicer attachment on the blender to juice oranges.

britjh22


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sdc100 wrote:First of all, professional kitchens use their blenders a lot more than most homes so they pay for the build and longevity That doesn't prove it's any more capable. A professional kitchen also has $3000 ovens. Do you recommend that for most homes?



I think this person clearly needs a restaurant quality freezer to make enough ice for all that BURN!

digitalis303


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escalante wrote:Easy solution (well at least for me), use a blender and only eat vegetables low in sugar.

I find for my use blending is better and much easier, and you get the whole vegetable with the insoluble fiber (which I hear helps in many ways; digestion, sugar control, health, etc.).



This. We are making apples to oranges comparisons between juicers and blenders, but with that said, I never used the (non-Breville) juicer I owned. My wife pushed for a Vitamix last Xmas and despite my apprehension, I have not been disappointed. They really are better than standard blenders (though perhaps still a tad overpriced) but they are quite versatile (even cooking foods to some extent).
I guess my question to most of you is Why would you want to throw out the parts of the fruits/veggies that retain most of the fiber and nutrients. Most of what you are getting in juice is sugar and water (oversimplification, but....).