ThunderThighs


quality posts: 569 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff



Howdy all. Just a reminder that product discussions are great! FABULOUS even. Just don't let it get personal, pls.

Don't make me pull out my delete button.



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sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
escalante wrote:
That said I sold the Breville many years ago and started blending. I find for my use blending is better and much easier, and you get the whole vegetable with the insoluble fiber (which I hear helps in many ways; digestion, sugar control, health, etc.).



My original post mistakenly said that the pulp has many health benefits, which you repeat here. Unfortunately, insoluble fiber has very little nutritional value. It goes directly to the stool, which is its main benefit -- to help move waste in the intestines, preventing constipation. It also make you feel full, which I guess is beneficial. Virtually all the benefits you mentioned is in the soluble fiber, which juices retain. It's the reason juices are thicker than water, and why Metamucil is gummy. So don't worry about wasting nutrients if you juice.

escalante


quality posts: 8 Private Messages escalante
sdc100 wrote:My original post mistakenly said that the pulp has many health benefits, which you repeat here. Unfortunately, insoluble fiber has very little nutritional value. It goes directly to the stool, which is its main benefit -- to help move waste in the intestines, preventing constipation. It also make you feel full, which I guess is beneficial. Virtually all the benefits you mentioned is in the soluble fiber, which juices retain. It's the reason juices are thicker than water, and why Metamucil is gummy. So don't worry about wasting nutrients if you juice.


So are you saying it does “not’ help in sugar control? This goes against everything I have heard. No, I do not think it has much nutritional (nutrients) value, but I think it has health benefits, many which you mention here. By the way, I have been taking psyllium for years. I know that soluble fiber is the main one for sugar control, but a lot of sources tell me that insoluble also can also help.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
digitalis303 wrote:This. We are making apples to oranges comparisons between juicers and blenders, but with that said, I never used the (non-Breville) juicer I owned. My wife pushed for a Vitamix last Xmas and despite my apprehension, I have not been disappointed. They really are better than standard blenders (though perhaps still a tad overpriced) but they are quite versatile (even cooking foods to some extent).
I guess my question to most of you is Why would you want to throw out the parts of the fruits/veggies that retain most of the fiber and nutrients. Most of what you are getting in juice is sugar and water (oversimplification, but....).



Answers: 1) It's not true. Please read my posts re: soluble vs insoluble fiber. Juicing retains the soluble fiber, where all the health benefits are. Look it up on WebMD or MedLne. 2) Purées and pulp can cause gas and diarrhea in some people. 3) Juices are easier to drink for some people. 4) In some recipes, pulp would interfere with the cooking. For example, pulp would give sauces a weird texture, i.e. orange chicken, and may interfere in absorption, i.e. beef jerky. 5) YOu need to add water to a Vitamix blender to make hard fibrous foods, i.e. carrots, drinkable. The dilution means that it's [legally] no longer 100% juice. Not only would it be less nutritious per oz, but it would also be less flavorful. You'd then have to add sweeteners like sugar, honey or other juices. In other words, you can never have 100% carrot juice with a Vitamix -- or anything drinkable unless you use additives.

kbreedlove01


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kbreedlove01
digitalis303 wrote:This. We are making apples to oranges comparisons between juicers and blenders, but with that said, I never used the (non-Breville) juicer I owned. My wife pushed for a Vitamix last Xmas and despite my apprehension, I have not been disappointed. They really are better than standard blenders (though perhaps still a tad overpriced) but they are quite versatile (even cooking foods to some extent).
I guess my question to most of you is Why would you want to throw out the parts of the fruits/veggies that retain most of the fiber and nutrients. Most of what you are getting in juice is sugar and water (oversimplification, but....).



Most of the nutrients aren't in the fiber but rather the juice.

There's a fine line in making fresh juice though. People will buy a juicer, juice up apples and fruit exclusively delude themselves into thinking that they are being healthy, when really they've concentrated and increased their sugar intake. I mean it's better than drinking a soda, but it's not really good for you either.

For me I juice about a half to a whole pound of leafy greens every day (rotate between kale, chard, collard greens, and spinach). I do this particularly because I need the vitamins and nutrients from these vegetables, but I don't have the patience to sit down and eat that many greens through out the day. So I'm kind of cheating.

Even if I were to blend the amount greens that I juice on a daily basis into smoothies, I wouldn't be able to stomach that much food. One big juice a day is easier than 3 or 4 big green smoothies through out the day. I do green smoothies every now and then, but not as much as the juicing.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
escalante wrote:So are you saying it does “not’ help in sugar control? This goes against everything I have heard. No, I do not think it has much nutritional (nutrients) value, but I think it has health benefits, many which you mention here. By the way, I have been taking psyllium for years.



Soluble fiber (which is retained in juices) helps in sugar control, not insoluble fiber. Psyllium, i.e. Metamucil, is soluble fiber so you've been doing the right thing. Examples of soluble fiber includes the thickener pectin. If there was no soluble fiber in juice, it would be as thin as water. Eating insoluble fiber isn't a bad thing either so whole fruits are great.

metagg


quality posts: 1 Private Messages metagg
spun4621 wrote:I'm pretty close to getting one of these. But can I ask all of you that currently juice, do you find its more expensive to make your own juice? Produce costs seem to be going up everyday.

Its obvious that the health benefits of 100% fruit only juice are greater than the store bought kool-aid sugar juice, but I'm wondering what the costs look like to make your own.
(i.e. - a small package (a pint, maybe) of blueberries is at least $4 here.

Thanks for any input!



I bought one of these here several months ago. I still haven't used it. After paying all that money for fruits and vegetables, It just feels wrong to waste any of it for a small glass of juice. Sounds silly, but it's the truth. I like V-8 but don't see how it is possible to make it cheaper myself. I have one of those fancy blenders and I do use that for some great smoothies.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
metagg wrote:I bought one of these here several months ago. I still haven't used it. After paying all that money for fruits and vegetables, It just feels wrong to waste any of it for a small glass of juice. Sounds silly, but it's the truth. I like V-8 but don't see how it is possible to make it cheaper myself. I have one of those fancy blenders and I do use that for some great smoothies.



I agree, It's usually much more expensive to juice, especially when commercial juices are on sale. The real value in juicing for me is the ability to make really weird blends that you can't buy. Living in NYC, I have access to ethnic fruits and vegetables that probably have never been juiced commercially. It's fun to experiment. We're going to try to juice some Japanese eggplant later...

matthewsoft


quality posts: 0 Private Messages matthewsoft

Thanks for all the great info sdc100! Now I'm curious what you think about Masticating juicers? Also known as cold press? I like the idea that they're quieter and preserve more pulp to drink. Do they take significantly longer? Do they not work for certain foods? I'm specifically looking at the BJS600XL: Juice Fountain Crush.

For the leafy vegetables it says it excels on, would these be fine blended? I like the idea of feeling more full by consuming some pulp, but I don't want it to be "stringy" with using leafy vegetables or celery. And what about nuts?

I've never owned a juicer, but I have been wanting to invest in one as I want to increase my use of fresh vegetables and fruits. A lot of times I will buy fruits like oranges and then don't feel like dealing with all the stringy bits. It's not necessarily the taste of those bits, but I don't like the texture. I think if they were blended well, I wouldn't mind it so much, and still feel more full from all that fiber.

I do have a Ninja BL700 Kitchen System.

Thanks for all the great info!

sdc100 wrote:Soluble fiber (which is retained in juices) helps in sugar control, not insoluble fiber. Psyllium, i.e. Metamucil, is soluble fiber so you've been doing the right thing. Examples of soluble fiber includes the thickener pectin. If there was no soluble fiber in juice, it would be as thin as water. Eating insoluble fiber isn't a bad thing either so whole fruits are great.



cocodiva


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cocodiva
tracylee wrote:I love love love my Juice Fountain! Very easy to use and clean. I regularly juice carrots, celery, ginger and a lime or lemon. I've also done oranges and pomegranates for a yummy juice.



Thanks. I need a new one. I'm new to juicing, so I'm thinking of this model.

Does it come with the the little attachment to juice directly in to the glass? My routine is juice right into a mason jar, put the lid on, and had out the door in the morning.

cocodiva


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cocodiva

This mornings juice from the el cheapo "cookinex" juicer was full of fibers - and he pulp was wet, so I definitely need a new juicer.

Is this the one I should buy?

I'm new to juicing, so I'm thinking of buying the juice fountain (two speed model.)

Does it come with the the little attachment to juice directly in to the glass? My routine is juice right into a mason jar, put the lid on, and had out the door in the morning.

cocodiva


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cocodiva
spun4621 wrote:I'm pretty close to getting one of these. But can I ask all of you that currently juice, do you find its more expensive to make your own juice? Produce costs seem to be going up everyday.

Its obvious that the health benefits of 100% fruit only juice are greater than the store bought kool-aid sugar juice, but I'm wondering what the costs look like to make your own.
(i.e. - a small package (a pint, maybe) of blueberries is at least $4 here.

Thanks for any input!




I'm grateful to live in SoCal where we have access to an abundance of affordable produce. Some things are pricey now. Like for some reason there is a shortage of organic apples.

I make a trip to the Farmers' Market each week for fresh, organic produce. I go to the same farm stand each week, and have negotiated a good deal on a fixed rate for a mixed box of whatever they have that week. This means that I eat and juice what's available, instead of what I might want - but it's the cheapest way and I've always been told that having what's in season is healthier anyway.

I definitely notice the difference in how I feel with fresh juice as opposed to buying it from the store. It's worth the expense - bu those are some ways to mitigate the cost.

laurajhawk


quality posts: 0 Private Messages laurajhawk

Yeah, that apple photo is odd. That is clearly a larger apple. I have the Juice Fountain Plus, and I drop small apples straight into it. I quarter the larger apples.

I got the Plus from Woot last year, and I use it every day. Love it! It is very easy.

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 569 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

laurajhawk wrote:Yeah, that apple photo is odd. That is clearly a larger apple. I have the Juice Fountain Plus, and I drop small apples straight into it. I quarter the larger apples.

I got the Plus from Woot last year, and I use it every day. Love it! It is very easy.


It's a Texas-sized apple.



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sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
cocodiva wrote:This mornings juice from the el cheapo "cookinex" juicer was full of fibers - and he pulp was wet, so I definitely need a new juicer.

Is this the one I should buy?

I'm new to juicing, so I'm thinking of buying the juice fountain (two speed model.)

Does it come with the the little attachment to juice directly in to the glass? My routine is juice right into a mason jar, put the lid on, and had out the door in the morning.



When I bought mine several years ago, we compared several centrifugal juicers. The Breville definitely produced the driest pulp. In fact, the apple pulp was so dry that it was inedible without adding some water. Softer fruits will produce wetter pulp. We also chose the Breville because it was the easiest to clean. In my opinion, if you want a centrifugal juicer, the Brevilles are probably the best ones available. They extract more juice and are easier to clean. And this is a great price, no matter which model you choose. The other question you should ask yourself is whether you want a centrifuugal juicer like these Brevilles, or a cold press masticating juicer which literally chews and squeezes juice out of your produce.

And yes, the juicer does have a spigot that you can place your glass beneath. It might be best to use the pitcher though since the tight fit prevents splashing. YOu can then pour the juice into your jar, leaving any extra in the fridge.

escalante


quality posts: 8 Private Messages escalante
cocodiva wrote:Thanks. I need a new one. I'm new to juicing, so I'm thinking of this model.

Does it come with the the little attachment to juice directly in to the glass? My routine is juice right into a mason jar, put the lid on, and had out the door in the morning.


From the pictures it appears the spout of the juicer connects directly to the glass, pouring the juice directly into it providing a splatter guard. I looks like it has some sort of storage/transport lid on it. I purchased the first model of the juicer and it did not even have the storage glass (you supplied your own glass).

The video is not much help, it is just basically a video of the blond girl (but hey, that is what sells!). Most of the video you CANNOT even see the juicer. And the storage container appears to be a different style or model.

By the way, driving + mason jars + teeth are NOT a good mix.


rxbike@gmail.com


quality posts: 5 Private Messages rxbike@gmail.com

I've had the 510 (the one that is sold out) for over 3 years. Use it everyday at least once and sometimes twice a day for breakfast and after dinner. This thing can do a lot, your creativity in finding the right recipe for you is the key. Lately I've been using the juice and adding in fresh berries and raw almonds in a personal blender - magic bullet type- to make smoothies with some flare.

Cleaning is very easy , use the scrub brush to scrub the strainer/blade unit. The rest just rinses clean, just remember to clean right after you are done otherwise if you juice carrots, it may stain the plastic. I throw mine in the dishwasher all the time and never an issue, makes the cleaning much easier.

We've used the pulp to add to muffin or bread mix to bake with and it does add a good amount of fiber to your diet.
I will advocate this system since using it over three years, I've brought my cholesterol from 250 to 175 (with the initial help of a statin for 6 months) and now I am statin free .

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
cocodiva wrote:I'm grateful to live in SoCal where we have access to an abundance of affordable produce. Some things are pricey now. Like for some reason there is a shortage of organic apples.



Perhaps the Californian drought is the reason. The national news just reported that the drought will have a domino effect on virtually all foods throughout the US, i.e. if cows and chicken starve, milk and egg will be more expensive, making many everyday foods more expensive, etc.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
matthewsoft wrote:Thanks for all the great info sdc100! Now I'm curious what you think about Masticating juicers? Also known as cold press? I like the idea that they're quieter and preserve more pulp to drink. Do they take significantly longer? Do they not work for certain foods? I'm specifically looking at the BJS600XL: Juice Fountain Crush.

For the leafy vegetables it says it excels on, would these be fine blended? I like the idea of feeling more full by consuming some pulp, but I don't want it to be "stringy" with using leafy vegetables or celery. And what about nuts?

I've never owned a juicer, but I have been wanting to invest in one as I want to increase my use of fresh vegetables and fruits. A lot of times I will buy fruits like oranges and then don't feel like dealing with all the stringy bits. It's not necessarily the taste of those bits, but I don't like the texture. I think if they were blended well, I wouldn't mind it so much, and still feel more full from all that fiber.

I do have a Ninja BL700 Kitchen System.

Thanks for all the great info!



You're welcome. I considered a masticating juicer but cost, speed ease of cleaning convinced me to buy the Breville. For those who don't know, a masticating juicer uses a low speed, high torque auger (cork screw) to chew up and squeeze juice out. Here are some pros and cons.

CJ = Centrifugal juicer; MJ = masticating juicer

PROS:
1) Arguably uses less electricity. Most MJ use a 200-300 watt motor while good CJ have a 600-1000 watt motor. This can matter if your juicer is on the same line as another high wattage appliance. For example, you shouldn't run this 900 watt Breville simultaneously with a 1200 watt microwave on the same line. That said, you finish so much faster with a CJ that electrical usage probably evens out in the end.
2) MJ are better on leafy veggies because they lack bulk. I don't juice leafy veggies so it wasn't an issue for me (I do purée them in a blender sometimes).
3) MJ supposedly preserves nutrients because the CJ supposedly get hot. I haven't found my juices hot or warm so I don't know if this is true. And contact with the blade is so short that I don't think it really matters.
4) MJ doesn't aerate the juice. If you don't like foam in your juice, MJ may be preferable. The spinning blades of CJ blows air into the juice. The Brevilles do come with a foam filter. That said, I don't buy the claims that aeration "oxidizes" the juice, removing nutrients. The people who claim that don't know what oxidation is.
5) MJ are much quieter. This may matter if you juice in the morning when people are still sleeping.

CONS:
1) MJ are generally much more expensive. You won't be able to find one less than $200, and most will be $250+. CJ can cost as little as $30, and these top-of-the-line Brevilles are only $120 refurbed.
2) Lots of prep time. The small opening requires that you cut everything into bite size pieces. With these Brevilles, you can literally drop in whole fruits, i.e. a small apple. A carrot can be continuously fed.
3) Slower extraction. These Brevilles can extract 3 apples in 30 seconds. I can't even tell you how long it takes the MJ.
3) Slower cleaning. Opening these Brevilles is a breeze, and then all you have to do is rinse most parts with hot water. The filter can be cleaned with a stiff brush. MJ are harder to disassemble, and the parts have lots of crevices.
4) The MJ that look like a meat grinder are too short to place a glass under. You need to use their small container.
5) MJ seem to extract less juice in harder produce but many people disagree with me. Let's call this a draw.

Ultimately, a juicer is only useful if used. I know several people who stopped juicing because their MJ was such a hassle. Yet if you juice a lot of leafy veggies, the trouble might be worth it.

As an aside, if you juice citrus fruits, consider a traditional motorized reamer. Not only is there almost no prep time, but the juice also tastes better because you avoid the bitter white pith. With both CJ and MJ, you need to peel the citrus fruit.

montcoman


quality posts: 1 Private Messages montcoman

Wooted the JE98XL last time.
Love it.
Never juiced before, am addicted now.

Favorite: Carrot, Apple, Kale, Sweet potato, dash of cinnamon and pumpkin pie spice--over the top!!!

Don't let veggies scare you.

josephjhaney


quality posts: 0 Private Messages josephjhaney

This seems to be taking a long time to ship, has anyone else gotten theirs yet?

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 569 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

josephjhaney wrote:This seems to be taking a long time to ship, has anyone else gotten theirs yet?

Yes, it does. If you haven't already, go ahead and Please email support@woot.com for assistance. Include your Woot username and order number for faster service.

I'll ask from this end as well.



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