mithral07


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mithral07

if it made Mountain Dew i would get it, but all it does is burn water, no ty

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Bunnyko


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Bunnyko
Hemo wrote:fargle. I'd be interested but I am lucky and someone gave me a Barista for Christmas last year.
http://coffeegeek.com/reviews/consumer/starbucks_barista



i got a barista last year too, they were on super clearance because they were bringing out a newer machine to replace them.

rwoody


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rwoody

After some awfully stale tasting coffee this morning and a long time desire to buy an espresso machine, I took the plunged.

I also bought a $90 Capresso Coffee Conical Burr grinder, 16-variable setting, and a slow grind setting, for this machine, my drip coffee, and my french press.

Hopefully this is all i need for a while.

As far as coffee beans go, I really like the flavor of Starbucks breakfast blend in the morning, or their other more bold bean roasts. Is it normal to buy any of these whole beans for the machine, or are there other types (easily purchasable) that are better suited?

Bunnyko


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Bunnyko
ahmadsamha wrote:I bought one of these two days ago. I'm packaging it up now and taking it back to the store and ordering one off here.

savings: $250!

Hooray!

Oh and it's an INCREDIBLE espresso machine. It's my first one and I'm already turning out near starbucks level espresso. I was going to buy the cheaper Cafe Roma, but when I held the filter, and it weighed a ton, I figured the entire thing was die cast stainless steel. The other one had this cheap piece of a major Hollywood production filter that would've broke in no time.


the filter should weigh a ton, thats how you know you aren;t getting an aluminum piece of carp that'll warm and make your espresso taste like butt.

Bunnyko


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Bunnyko
ahmadsamha wrote:Actually I have this machine and it says specifically NOT to use distilled water. I don't know why, though.

Anyone know?



if you put distilled water in a microwave and heat it past boiling, it won;t boil, it will explode when you move it though, same can happen in your machine.

zanex


quality posts: 0 Private Messages zanex

I just bought this product and I have no idea how to make it work (never used any kind of coffee machine before). Is there a site with step by step instructions for idiots like me?

androus2001


quality posts: 3 Private Messages androus2001
ahmadsamha wrote:It's my first one and I'm already turning out near starbucks level espresso



llo, not exactly a ringing endorsement

david2006


quality posts: 0 Private Messages david2006
zanex wrote:I just bought this product and I have no idea how to make it work (never used any kind of coffee machine before). Is there a site with step by step instructions for idiots like me?



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFybMtyEviM

David Cohen

srlagarto


quality posts: 11 Private Messages srlagarto

First of all, I agree with most people here about respiffied not being a problem. It will have been sterilized and, most likely, key parts would have been replaced. I wouldn't have a problem buying it because of that. However, I would never buy something like this at a thrift store or off Craigslist unless it was factory sealed, since you really have no idea what the previous owner did to it. I don't have the knowledge or equipment to properly sterilize it myself.

androus2001 wrote:Dude-- 30 trips to starbucks and this thing has paid for itself

unless you go to the Magical Starbucks where you only pay 30 cents for your Grande Latte


I go to the magical Starbucks (when I'm not near a better shop) where a venti cup of coffee is about $2.00 and a venti mocha is about $4.00. I don't know about the latte prices, but they're not $5.00. Still, if you regularly go to Starbucks and you have time in the morning to brew it yourself, you will save money in the long run. On the other hand, if you only go once a week or are always in a hurry in the morning, you'll want other reasons besides the cost savings to buy this (such as better tasting coffee or the experience of making it yourself).

ahmadsamha wrote:Actually I have this machine and it says specifically NOT to use distilled water. I don't know why, though.

Anyone know?


I found reference to another machine that recommends not using distilled water. From http://www.thecoffeebrewers.com/pali90auesma.html, "The Pasquini Livia has built-in sensors that measure the fullness of the water reservoir. These sensors will not work correctly if there is no mineral content in the water, and may cause the machine to "refuse" to brew espresso because it believes that there is no water in the tank." This makes sense, since distilled water isn't very good at conducting electricity.

That could be the same reason with this machine. It probably isn't exploding water, since that's mainly a problem with bringing water past the boiling point in a microwave. A microwave will heat the water more evenly than the espresso machine will, so there aren't any currents in the water as it heats. The lack of currents, combined with clean water, a clean container, and smooth sides, prevents the bubbles from forming as it boils. The water passes the boiling point. Then, when you move the container, the movement causes a bubble to form, which starts a chain reaction and a potentially violent eruption of water. I've seen it happen with tap water, not just distilled, though it's more likely to happen with distilled. It's also easily solved by using a temperature sensor to make sure the water doesn't get too hot.

Using distilled water may also cause some of the problems described earlier, such as the scrap water tray overflowing.

ledzeppelin588 wrote:There's a saying on coffeegeek, that if a company makes a toaster you probably shouldn't buy an espresso machine of the same brand (De Longhi, Breville).


I would think that would depend on if it's a toaster company making an espresso machine or an espresso machine company making a toaster. In the latter case, maybe the people at toastgeek.com would say don't buy the toaster (yes, I know toastgeek.com doesn't exist).

Kutuzov


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Kutuzov

Bought this about 6 months ago after researching getting a good machine for a good price. A real steal at this price. Use it everyday and with quality coffee and a good grind, makes "A damn fine cup of joe!" (well, espresso).

anonymous4507


quality posts: 0 Private Messages anonymous4507

hmm interesting. that looks nice i dont like coffee though.

shrumscott


quality posts: 0 Private Messages shrumscott

Does anyone know the warming time on this machine? You know, from plug-in to prime. Also, is there a significant time between shots (besides knocking out the old puck and tamping a new one)?

Itwdswafo


quality posts: 8 Private Messages Itwdswafo
busterjonez wrote:Pressurized System? respiffied? Sounds like the recipe for a wicked steam burn...

I'll be keeping my arms and spending the extra dough on a new one. Shame, cause I am in the market, too.



Couldn't be any worse than the Cornballer!

sometrouble


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sometrouble

Oh I want this so bad! Why oh why did I quit caffeine three weeks ago? By the time I give up on giving up coffee...I will have to pay full price for one of these.

Indiefab


quality posts: 3 Private Messages Indiefab

If you buy this, do yourself a favor and do some reading on home-barista.com to get some mad pro-barista skills.

dglazier


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dglazier
FJRFoxes wrote:Aeropress...has great reviews...manual expresso maker.

THANKS



I have one. Actually, two, one for office and one for home. It's a one-cup coffeemaker; it is not
by any stretch of the imagination an espresso maker, despite the box's claims.

derekjon


quality posts: 5 Private Messages derekjon

need...more....wootoff

ercanmetin


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ercanmetin
androus2001 wrote:Dude-- 30 trips to starbucks and this thing has paid for itself

unless you go to the Magical Starbucks where you only pay 30 cents for your Grande Latte



How can you guys compare a home made coffee with starbucks junk!
nothing tastes good in starbucks!

Kalenth


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Kalenth

I was asleep for 15 minutes yesterday and the Blogging Old CEO came. Woot, you bastard!

AnGeLiCbOrIs


quality posts: 0 Private Messages AnGeLiCbOrIs

Very impressive looking!!

harris314


quality posts: 0 Private Messages harris314

Re: Breville 15-Bar Die-Cast Espresso and Cappuccino Maker

spearl


quality posts: 0 Private Messages spearl

From a interface and asthetic point of view, the machine is flawless. It's beautiful and solid, and has many nice touches like an integral storage bin and swiveling steam wand. Having said that, it's missing a few things on the INSIDE that you'd expect from a $400 machine:

For one, it uses a thermoblock. This results in a pressure drop and uneven heating compared to a boiler, which is why there is the need for the double-wall crema system. (I'm referring here to pump machines with boilers, not the cheap steam machines.) This is why you'll find that after brewing you have a soupy sludge instead of the hard dry puck considered an indicator of proper espresso brewing.

Second, the filters and group head aren't made of brass (which is more temperature stable) like you'll see in machines of similar price.

Personally, I'm not sure I have a sophisticated enough palette to discern a difference between espresso from this and a machine with better parts. But given that you're considering spending $400 on an espresso machine, I assume you might be a purist and somebody who cares about getting the best for your money. I also feel the need to offset some of the other breathless reviews by people who clearly haven't bothered to do even a minimal amount of research on espresso machines.

Despite the above, the machine produces very good espresso, as far as I can tell, and it IS beautiful. My guess is that it overcomes some of its component shortcomings with nice engineering (such as the auto-purge feature to avoid scalding the grounds). However, you have to wonder if you're really getting your money's worth where it counts, when there are machines out there at half the price with better internal components and plumbing. You should be able to find machines with more stable temperature and higher effective pressure for much less money if you're willing to go for substance over looks.
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71 of 79 people found the following review helpful:
2.0 out of 5 stars Don't be seduced, April 27, 2006
By Elias Amador "caffeine junkie" (Fresno, CA, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)
The Breville 800ESXL proves the old cliche that sometimes beauty really is skin deep. It's a gorgeous package, but it seems like all the money and thought went into making the case and controls, and virtually nothing went into the components that make up the heart of an espresso machine: the boiler, grouphead and portafilter.

By way of background, I've been through several espresso machines in the past, including a couple of those cheap Krups steam machines (OK for the price, but not recommended for serious espresso), and I currently have a Gaggia Espresso and Gaggia MDF grinder. The Espresso is a comparatively cheap machine with a plastic case, but it has a decent boiler and an excellent cast brass grouphead and commercial size brass portafilter. I've been very happy with this machine for the last five years, but we recently remodeled our kitchen and the old Gaggia doesn't fit in with the new decor, so it has to go.

When I first hefted the box that the new Breville came in, I thought it must be a well-made machine because it seemed to weigh a ton. Well, maybe not a ton, but at least 25 pounds. Getting it out of the box by myself was a struggle. I thought I might throw my back out getting it onto the counter. Usually, greater weight is a fairly reliable indication of higher quality, but that's not always the case, as I was about to find out.

From the outside, it's very sexy with all that brushed, die cast stainless steel, metal buttons with LED lights, ball mounted steam wand, even stainless steel on the water tank and drip tray. It also has some very thoughtful features, like a hidden comparment behind the drip tray that holds all the accessories, a special tool to clean out the steam wand, etc.

Unfortunately, the portafilter and group head are both aluminum, and the portafilter is much smaller and less substantial than the Gaggia's commercial size 58mm brass portafilter and group head. The Breville also uses a "crema enhancer", which is usually not considered the best way to make espresso. It produces lots of crema, but not necessarily great flavor. Internally, the Breville doesn't have a true boiler like most mid to high end machines. Instead, it's got a "thermoblock", which is smaller and holds less water than a boiler, and thus doesn't do a good job of producing consistent amounts of hot water at the proper temperature, which is essential for good espresso shots.

Firing it up for the first time, I liked how it warmed up within a couple of minutes, much faster than the Gaggia. The LED's glow blue-white around the power and steam buttons. Very futuristic. I ran a blank shot through the portafilter to warm things up, then ground some Trader Joe's French roast at setting 5 on the MDF, tamped it down hard, and went for the first double shot. The machine pumped a few quick bursts of water into the grounds to prime and expand them, then got down to brewing. Sure enough, the espresso came out fast and frothy. Too fast. Ideally, a shot should take 20 or 25 seconds to brew, and it should dribble out in a nice gentle stream. Not so with the Breville. That thing blasted out a full shot in 10 or 15 seconds, squirting it hard into the glasses. Hmmm. Not encouraging.

The espresso itself looked good with plenty of crema, but it tasted bitter and lacked the creamy, almost chocolatey flavor of the espresso that the Gaggia normally makes. Using the espresso in some steamed milk for a latte, it tasted acceptable, but drinking it on its own wasn't much fun. I tried a few more shots at different grind settings, but still no joy. The espresso looks "right" because of the crema, but it tastes sour.

I also noticed that the coffee grounds don't come out of the filter in a nice hard puck like they do in the Gaggia, but instead dribble out in a gloppy mess. It took me five or six hard whacks in the knock box to get all the grounds out, whereas the Gaggia normally only takes one or two knocks. This is another sign that the machine isn't brewing correctly for quality espresso. A good machine should make firm, dry pucks of spent coffee grounds.

The steaming feature seems adequate, but a bit anemic compared to the Gaggia. Another side effect of the thermoblock design, perhaps?

The bottom line seems to be that the Breville looks great and feels very well made and substantial, but it doesn't come through in the one area that really matters in an espresso machine: making good espresso. As far as I'm concerned, an espresso machine could be made out of duct tape and cardboard, but as long as it makes great coffee I'd be willing to live with it. But looking great isn't good enough. So it's going back to Amazon, and getting replaced with a Gaggia Classic.
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51 of 57 people found the following review helpful:
2.0 out of 5 stars Hard-to-find filters clog easily, October 21, 2006
By Kevin Murphy (Los Angeles, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)
This machine is indeed beautiful, and I find the espresso very good indeed. The problem is that if your coffee is ground too fine, even once, the filter clogs. Due to the design of the crema filter, there is an inaccessible "interior" between the coffee-side filter holes and the bottom-side single exit hole. If this gets too clogged, there is really nothing to do except get a new filter, as the clog is not reachable with any tool.

This wouldn't be too bad if you could actually GET filter baskets when you need them. The only online company that carried them seems to be out of business now. And without a filter basket, this is just so much pretty scupture.

UPDATE: You can get the filters from Breville USA, for a price. You can also use a backflush detergent (like JoeGlo) to clear them, although it's a bit time-consuming and messy.

heinousbitca


quality posts: 0 Private Messages heinousbitca
ahmadsamha wrote:It does work with Pods. It has a special attachment to the filter that's engraved with POD.



...which is really handy at 8:30 in the morning, let me tell you.

it's got its flaws but for the price you can't beat it and it makes lovely espresso.

abonay


quality posts: 0 Private Messages abonay

This is unrelated to coffee, but I had to mention that woot's customer service rocks! I was one of many that had the problem with selecting three blinged out cabbages yesterday, and they sent a reply that they would change my quantity with no problem! Although I do wonder how more carp can suddenly materialize after it "sold out" at a specific quantity...

duff750


quality posts: 0 Private Messages duff750

I find it rather amusing that if you look at the product stats, the "most wooters wooting" are in the originating state of Starbucks...and also where there is a Starbucks on every friggin corner of every friggin street! llo

keeleyt83


quality posts: 0 Private Messages keeleyt83
dbarnett22 wrote:Define irony in 10 words or less.

Irony = This item - immediately following a woot-off.



Maybe us this in your quest for a Blogging Old CEO in the next woot-off?

lrvman


quality posts: 1 Private Messages lrvman
ryanroat wrote:Does this work with pods like the illy ESE pods? (I know a true afficionado would likely dismiss them, but I'd just like the option.)


Not the ESE pods, but I'm sure the standard pod, like Senseo, or Folgers pods will work.

lrvman


quality posts: 1 Private Messages lrvman
abonay wrote:This is unrelated to coffee, but I had to mention that woot's customer service rocks! I was one of many that had the problem with selecting three blinged out cabbages yesterday, and they sent a reply that they would change my quantity with no problem! Although I do wonder how more carp can suddenly materialize after it "sold out" at a specific quantity...


That's because a specifically trained Woot intern digs thru the local Wal-Mart's dumpster to find prime carp JUST FOR YOU!

BER3N


quality posts: 3 Private Messages BER3N
elpepe wrote:I'm sorry, but a used appliance that makes food or beverages is gross. Even if it does use boiling hot water and air 15 times greater than atmospheric pressure.



Everytime you hit a restaurant, you are getting 'the goods' from the persons before you. At least here you know that it has been professionally cleaned and you can even clean it again. YOu are in control. This a good product at a great price. My 'respiffied' FrancisFrancis X3 rocks. Besides, 'recertified/refurbished' does not always mean 'used'.

ctmyas


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ctmyas

how come this product aint sellin as fast as the products were for the past 3 days were you would get like 20 products a day?

androus2001


quality posts: 3 Private Messages androus2001

Some useful reviews:


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars Tricky but Excellent, March 8, 2008
By xpovos - See all my reviews
It is absolutely critical with this machine that you find the right beans, the right grind setting, apply the right tamping pressure, and follow the instructions that came with the machine. If you don't, you'll wonder how you could have wasted several hundred dollars on this appliance. If you DO, though, you'll wonder how you could have wasted so much money at coffee houses when you could have been getting the same quality at home.

The pump is strong, so you need a very fine grind. With a grind that's too coarse, no amount of tamping pressure will get you in the ideal time "zone" for a great shot of espresso with this machine. I recommend getting a better tamper than what's included with the Breville. I like the Reg Barber tampers. (FYI, your tamper needs to have a 51-millimeter base.)

With some practice and consistency of technique, this machine produces consistently excellent, commercial-quality drinks. It's picky, though: slip up on your technique even once, and you'll know it immediately with the first sip.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars This Machine is Fun!, January 25, 2008
By spats41 (Denver) - See all my reviews
This machine is fun! This is my first espresso machine and I considered many others before I bought it. Other, more expensive machines may be as good or even better, but for under $400 I am very pleased! It is a solidly built and beautifully designed machine, and makes great coffee!
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful:
4.0 out of 5 stars The Best Expresso Maker for the Price, January 22, 2008
By A Customer - See all my reviews
The Breville 800 ESXL is turning out to be one of the best buys I have ever madeBreville 800ESXL Commercial 15-Bar Triple-Priming Die-Cast Espresso Machine.

I had a Gaggia that produced great espresso when I first got it, but recently, it stopped creating any crema whatsoever. Water leaked from the steamer wand and the expresso head. It was time for a replacement.

I studied and studied and studied all the expresso makers and I knew I did not want to spend over $500 for a good pot. My goal was to find a great pot for under that amount. I read every review there is on the internet concerning the Breville 800 ESXL. People love it or hate it but if you read carefully, you may find as I did, that many of those who hate it, did not follow the directions as prescribed by Breville. They treated it like their old pot, however, the Breville 800 is a wonderful pot if used according to the instructions put out by Breville. And dare I say, that some of the others who did not like the pot sounded like coffee snobs who want perfection and had no right buying this machine and judging by standards that only a much more expensive machine could match.

If you want a truly outstanding expresso or cappuccino, the Breville 800 will do it for you, as long as you live up to your part of the bargain. The first thing you need are really good beans and fresh filtered water. Next is to really learn how to make expresso. You need to find the right grind and then stick with it. I have a Capresso Burr Grinder that works great for only $85. You need to learn the right amount of pressure to tamp the coffee (also, it does not hurt purchase a good metal tamp- the one they give you is only okay). You should get a thermometer to make sure your frothed milk is between 140 - 160 degrees and then learn how to froth milk. The cups should be warm and you will have some great coffee.

you may not get great coffee the first time out--- and maybe not the second, but the more you do it, critique what you did, and make adjustments, you will find that the difference between and excellent cup and a good cup has more to do with you than the machine. This is a hands-on machine (which I love about it). Like a cook using fresh ingredients, the results often lie in the art of the cook. It is the same with this machine. If you just want to turn it on and get a great cup of espresso, it may happen sometimes, but not always. It is up to you to make your shot the best. There is a learning curve to be sure, but the end result is fantastic - and for a great price. I was making great shot after great shot in about three days.

I was scared to death about my filters clogging as others have said, but I have found that the best thing you can do is to clean after every shot. it is not a big job to wipe down the nozzle, rinse out the pots and filters, and take the little tool they give you to keep the filters open and poke the hole once to keep it open for the next time. Takes all of a minute- maybe less. The result, great expresso, perfect crema, great frothed milk (once you acquire the knack of rothing), and a beautiful, sturdy machine that should last a long time with the kind of care I ask you to give it.

Some have complained about the temperature of the coffee. I too thought it was not hot enough the first few times I made the espresso, and then I read the manual. When you do what the manual says, the coffee is plenty hot --too hot actually. As for the time it takes to steam the milk, no longer than my Gaggia with a lot less mess. And about the "sloppy mess in the portafilter" and no dry puck ---- well, I would like a dry puck too, but the paper from Breville in the box tells you that the technology they use to get the coffee hot and with perfect crema will not give you the traditional dry puck. Expect it to be watery in the portafilter. just rinse it out when done and you are in business. I accept that and as a result I get great coffee. My machine is not a Rencilio, nor a Gaggia. It is a Breville and it does not have the dry puck--- but it does have great espresso that can be made within a minute or two of turning on the machine. And clean up takes less time than it did to heat up (under a minute).

It has a large well for water which is easy to fill, from the front and the back. it is very very easy to clean. It is sturdy and it looks great. There are so many cool things built in --- obviously thought went into the design. Some complain about it being loud. I have never met an espresso maker that is not loud. Oh yes, I saw one once but that machine cost $2,000 and was fully automatic. There was no joy in making an expresso with that---- no art to it. The machine does it all.

Now, for the weaknesses. I already told you to get another tamp. The one they give is not the greatest. Also, it has the very cool feature where it purges itself after each shot or steaming allowing the built up steam to flow to the overflow reservoir. (Actually this is a positive feature) but on the negative side it uses more water, but no big deal unless you are paying for bottled water. With my Gaggia, I was always afraid it was going to blow up on me. This steam pressure release is very cool and well thought out.

Needless to say, I am very happy with this machine. As you may be able to see, I am the kind of person who looks at what I have done and tries to make the next one better. For me, this machine does not disappoint.

Hopefully, this review has helped.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars Breville 800ESXL Tips for Excellent Espresso, January 21, 2008
By FoMo - See all my reviews
After 3 weeks of "so-so" espresso's and cappuccino's, I was ready to return the 800ESXL. The espresso produced was not hot enough, and the frothed milk not even close to the dense foam I had hoped for. But I gave it one more try using the below techniques, and the results were night and day.

Pre-Heat the machine, then run water thru the portafilter for at least 10 seconds. By doing this, the water temp went from 140 to 174 degrees. OK, so this is recommended in the instructions...but who really reads them?

Using the Breville Conical Burr Grinder, I found the "click" setting two clicks down from Espresso (towards Turkish) worked best. (Great grinder, producing perfectly even grinds every time. Highly recommended!)

Practice your tamping technique. I bought a "Terry's Tamper" which is much easier to use than the supplied Breville tamper/scoop. Tamping pressure is the greatest variable between success and failure. At least it was for me.

To improve frothing, I tried covering the top hole on the stainless steel frothing attachment with tape and it worked to perfection. I could not get the desired "micro-foam" before making this modification. I have since used a tiny screw to close up the top hole. This really made a difference in the density of the foam, using both non-fat and 2% milk.

Keep your frothing pitcher in the freezer, and use very cold milk.

As other reviewers have suggested, after brewing your espresso and dumping the puck, run another 5 to 10 second shot of water thru the portafilter to purge it out. I have yet to have the filter clog up.

androus2001


quality posts: 3 Private Messages androus2001
ctmyas wrote:how come this product aint sellin as fast as the products were for the past 3 days were you would get like 20 products a day?



because when you get thousands of jacked-up w00t monkeys staring at their screens hitting F5 over and over for days during a w00t-off, it tends to drive product sales

lrvman


quality posts: 1 Private Messages lrvman

Not sure, Australia is not known for Espresso, and looks like this company is their version of America's Hamilton-Beach, in other words, makes every single appliance known to kitchen science, but none of their products excel.

Breville was founded in 1932 in Sydney, Australia and has become a worldwide leader in home appliances. With over 90 patents registered globally, Breville manufactures more than 220 products worldwide. Breville was launched in the United States in late 2002 and has become the fastest growing countertop appliance brand in the country.
Breville has received worldwide design recognition from the International Housewares Association Design Awards to the Australian Engineering Awards. Among its innovations are the world’s first scissor action sandwich press, indoor health grill, wide feed tube juicer for juicing whole fruits, and active arm powered citrus press. We have made a name for ourselves by a dedicated approach to using only the highest quality materials that are engineered with an exacting attention to detail that give our products a look and feel that is completely unique to the marketplace.

grtgrfx


quality posts: 7 Private Messages grtgrfx
bkyhoe wrote:in a totally unrelated subject, does anyone use a satellite with TiVo? Was thinking of getting my parents Tivo for Christmas and wondering if it works ok with satellite.



So ya know...new high-def TiVos only work with Cable. SD TiVos work fine with Satellite but you won't get a sharp signal if you have HD service. I have a Series-2 TiVo connected by S-Video cable to my DirecTV box, and it controls the receiver just fine. However, it is NOT high-def, so you won't see widescreen channels on occasion (reverts to standard format and lower quality). If you don't have a HDTV, then it doesn't matter at all, TiVo works fine.

BER3N


quality posts: 3 Private Messages BER3N
ctmyas wrote:how come this product aint sellin as fast as the products were for the past 3 days were you would get like 20 products a day?



wootoff = over

juangt


quality posts: 0 Private Messages juangt
ahmadsamha wrote:Actually I have this machine and it says specifically NOT to use distilled water. I don't know why, though.

Anyone know?



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZAqqpDF4bVw
and the opposite
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lISK1YFcZBM

mental note *think of a signature*

nevrbeenscared


quality posts: 0 Private Messages nevrbeenscared

excellent deal at that price...new they are 399.00. too bad i i dont drink that carp!!!!LLO

Mitchell Hatt

bertone590


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bertone590

This is a machine you want to stay away from. It never reaches proper water temp. for a good coffee.
Cleaning after making an espresso to make another is a problem. On and off switch is problematic at best.
Even it's more expensive brother has the same problems, just does it in style.
I've owned both and returned both.

mcoffey972


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mcoffey972

This is a good home machine, get a different portafilter that is non-pressurized and it will pull better shots than 99% of your local shops. I was going to buy a Rancillio Sylvia but this is good enough for home use and $550 cheaper.

avante296


quality posts: 2 Private Messages avante296
juangt wrote:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZAqqpDF4bVw
and the opposite
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lISK1YFcZBM



dist. water is very corrosive and may "eat" some metals and robber