jeffreyd73


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jeffreyd73
JohnnyLemonhead wrote:So this whole candlepower deal got me thinking becuse I have always wondered what that meant. I mean, are we going to stick all those candles together and focus their light and if we did would it really be the same as the electronic counterpart being offered?

Before I even got into that issue, however, I remembered another type of power that I have always wondered about: horsepower. I mean, is a 300 HP car really the same as 300 horses' power being harnessed together? It turns out the whole HP deal is pretty complicated. First of all, even a the power of one horse is not technically equal to 1HP! On average, with continuous operation, a single horse produces less than 1HP. Can you believe it?!?!?! A single horse's power is not even one HP. What is the world coming to.

Now, and this will blow your mind folks, a single horse was measured at a peak of over 14HP! They didn't sustain it for a long period, but they still got there! How is that even possible?!?! A single horse making over 14HP? Shouldn't they change the measurement to included what is possible? I mean, typically power is rated in terms of peak or possible, not average. Do you think your 3.2GHz computer is always running at 3.2GHz? Think again. Science is silly.



here! here! but i would contend that it is not the science itself that is silly but it is the man who tries to make it fit his own motives that is silly. Science rocks! People are silly.

bpr2


quality posts: 182 Private Messages bpr2

O_O


You want three

Garrity 1 Watt Luxeon® LED Spotlight - 2 Pack

You want 6 Garrity KS200 1 Watt Luxeon® LED Spotlight (Random Color)(s).




SIX when you order three

that was fun while it lasted!

zozzles


quality posts: 6 Private Messages zozzles

Just to be on topic: yeah, I sprung for a pair. Presuming they are decent LEDs and have reasonable heatsinking it ought to be a good deal.


Just for grins, there is an interesting "Instructable" at:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Giant_100mm_LED/

which uses three 1 watt LEDs and stands a couple of feet tall.



MichaelSF


quality posts: 92 Private Messages MichaelSF

I started buying LED lights back when a single LED bulb was very expensive and quite unique. A one-LED light (meaning a single bulb) for $45.

Now look at these. 1 watt for $5.

I dunno, but does anyone still use the old style lights with non-LED bulbs? That's the key to this deal, LED bulbs that last forever.

Like the ad says, put one in each car, one each by the house front and back doors and you are good to go.

Also nice is that they work on "generic" AA batteries. My 500,000 candle power lights are great, but they have rechargeable batteries (built-in) and that's a hassle.

I recommend using those Sanyo AA rechargeable batteries, the "ENELOOP" model. They stay charged and discharge at about 10% a year. That's good in my book.

gbfromtenn


quality posts: 0 Private Messages gbfromtenn
bpr2 wrote:O_O


You want three

Garrity 1 Watt Luxeon® LED Spotlight - 2 Pack

You want 6 Garrity KS200 1 Watt Luxeon® LED Spotlight (Random Color)(s).




SIX when you order three



gbfromtenn


quality posts: 0 Private Messages gbfromtenn

OK people...........You get 2(two) total lights for $19.99............right?And not 2x(2 pack) for total of 4 lights?Help me out here....................it's late.

bpr2


quality posts: 182 Private Messages bpr2

In the box:

* 2 Garrity KS200 Random Color 1 Watt LED Spotlights

if you order 1, you get two

order two you get four

order three, you get six

that was fun while it lasted!

JohnnyLemonhead


quality posts: 3 Private Messages JohnnyLemonhead

The interesting thing about LEDs are that as a diode (LED= light emitting diode) they are only a one way power flow. This is different from virtually all other electronic circuits which typically operate on a closed circuit. The diode is a one-way, not closed circuit, meaning the power flows through it one way but not back the other. The LE adds the light emission to the diode and makes the LED. Science is awesome.

rgant05


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rgant05

Terribly important to know that you get light output in "less than 100 ns", and that the LED will last for more than 100,000 hours, and all the other bs listed..... sure would be nice to know how much light it puts out. 1 watt leds typically don't put out the amount of light that I would consider to be a "spot light"... maybe a pocket light or a penlight. Good deal, but if you don't get anything to speak of... not a good deal------PASS

jimguida


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jimguida
mevande wrote:Woot says "" highest Flux per LED "" I wonder if this works on the same principle as the flux capacitor on device from the movie ""Back to the Future""



As opposed to the flux capacitor used on some other device?

rgant05


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rgant05
JohnnyLemonhead wrote:The interesting thing about LEDs are that as a diode (LED= light emitting diode) they are only a one way power flow. This is different from virtually all other electronic circuits which typically operate on a closed circuit. The diode is a one-way, not closed circuit, meaning the power flows through it one way but not back the other. The LE adds the light emission to the diode and makes the LED. Science is awesome.



Who are you trying to bumfusal? The LED is a closed circuit that conducts electrical current just like a light bulb. True the current goes "one way" through the LED... from negative to positive and back into the battery. If it didn't have any current path it wouldn't need a battery. ???? Science is awsome, common sense is valuable.

JohnnyLemonhead


quality posts: 3 Private Messages JohnnyLemonhead
rgant05 wrote:Who are you trying to bumfusal? The LED is a closed circuit that conducts electrical current just like a light bulb. True the current goes "one way" through the LED... from negative to positive and back into the battery. If it didn't have any current path it wouldn't need a battery. ???? Science is awsome, common sense is valuable.



I went to an accredited technological college of technology, O.K.?

Copied and pasted from Wikipedia:

"The most common function of a diode is to allow an electric current to pass in one direction (called the forward biased condition) and to block the current in the opposite direction (the reverse biased condition). Thus, the diode can be thought of as an electronic version of a check valve."

DrWats0n


quality posts: 1 Private Messages DrWats0n
portezbie wrote:I'm a bit obsessed with LED's and I'm familiar with luxeon. It is a good LED but the 1 watt will only give you at most I'd guess 50-75 Lumens if your lucky and in all likelihood much less. To put that in perspective, a 100 watt lightbulb is aproxmiately 1500-1700 lumens.



I was thinking the same thing.
I assume it's using these:
http://www.luxeonstar.com/luxeon-staro-led-white-batwing-45-lm-350ma-p-245.php

but 4 AA batteries will only drive 6V @ 1Watt is only 166mA; or ~1/2 of the 45lm @ 350mA max output. or about 1/20th of a 40Watt incandescent output of 450lm

cyraxote


quality posts: 3 Private Messages cyraxote
Gripe wrote:Law of Physics: White the absence of color and black the combination of all colors.



Not so much. That's true of subtractive color, but not additive color. If you mix different colors of paint you will eventually get black. If you mix different colors of light in the right combination, you get white light. If what you state here were true of light, then adding colored gels to lights, as they do for the stage, would sometimes produce "black light." And using too many gels would actually make the stage black. These things don't happen.

Try to get your physics right before you start spouting about its laws...

And maybe I should have read all of the comments before posting this incredibly redundant one. Hard to see from up here on my high horse.

jsmrekar


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jsmrekar

1. all of the colors = registration
2. first time wootr, going to hack these into dual bike lights off my front fork for suburban night riding.

jsmrekar


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jsmrekar
DrWats0n wrote:I was thinking the same thing.
I assume it's using these:
http://www.luxeonstar.com/luxeon-staro-led-white-batwing-45-lm-350ma-p-245.php

but 4 AA batteries will only drive 6V @ 1Watt is only 166mA; or ~1/2 of the 45lm @ 350mA max output. or about 1/20th of a 40Watt incandescent output of 450lm



does this mean i can add 4 more AA and make it output 350mA? ill give it a go.

MichaelSF


quality posts: 92 Private Messages MichaelSF
gbfromtenn wrote:OK people...........You get 2(two) total lights for $19.99............right?And not 2x(2 pack) for total of 4 lights?Help me out here....................it's late.



I don't care, time for bed. But I thought EACH Woot contains TWO lights. And since this is two fer Tuesday, you get two boxes, so 4 lights.

As I have always read Woots, when they say "What's in the box" that means the individual item, and on Tuesdays it is two items.

I don't care. These are good lights to have sitting around the house and car for emergencies.

DrWats0n


quality posts: 1 Private Messages DrWats0n
naune wrote:Does anyone know if these have single LEDs or do they have the multi-LED "cluster"?



official product page ( http://www.garritylites.com/page92.html ) says : "Featuring a 1 Watt Luxeon® L.E.D."

singular.

DrWats0n


quality posts: 1 Private Messages DrWats0n
jsmrekar wrote:does this mean i can add 4 more AA and make it output 350mA? ill give it a go.



I'd take it apart to find out what LED it uses before ramping up the voltage before trusting my assumptions. Unless you're feeling experimental ;)

zozzles


quality posts: 6 Private Messages zozzles
JohnnyLemonhead wrote:I went to an accredited technological college of technology, O.K.?

Copied and pasted from Wikipedia:

"The most common function of a diode is to allow an electric current to pass in one direction (called the forward biased condition) and to block the current in the opposite direction (the reverse biased condition). Thus, the diode can be thought of as an electronic version of a check valve."



A couple of real-life problems with this.

A reverse-biased diode WILL permit what is known as "leakage current" to flow through it. Yes, this current is hugely less that the normal forward-biased situation, but it isn't zero. And, of course, it is in a direction opposite to forward-biased current.

Furthermore, there is a "break-down" voltage for any given diode. Once you impose a voltage higher than it in a reverse-biased condition, basically it doesn't act like a diode anymore. Either it will burn out or it will pass some current substantially larger than its reverse-biased current.

--- to avoid boredom, stop reading here
--- if you are already bored, "Oh well..."

Stupid anecdote: my father-out-law used to work on the beam line at Los Alamos National Laboratory, primarily on the electrical power section.

You might not think of it, but typical "diesel" trains really are electrical: the diesel engine runs at essentially its optimum RPM and runs an alternator whose current goes through a bridge rectifier made up of diodes which then runs the whopping big electrical motors that drive the train.

The diodes involved with those motors, of course, are not small. They are not the teensy little diodes you may have built circuits with if you are a DIY'er or are even tinier within an integrated circuit.

Noper, these deal with excess of 1000 amperes of current per motor at full power & usually two motors are running at a time.

So, basically we are talking about incredibly heavy-duty gear.

My father-out-law made himself rather unpopular with the facility's fire chief: not because he used these sorts of diodes, but because he kept burning them out.

Smoke, fire, noise, no fun at all. Still, I think that my ex's-dad got a blast out of both making that stuff work and what happened when it didn't work.

stacyemead


quality posts: 0 Private Messages stacyemead
Gripe wrote:Law of Physics: White the absence of color and black the combination of all colors.



You have that backwards - white is the combination of all colors and black is the absence of light.

woody14619


quality posts: 1 Private Messages woody14619
JohnnyLemonhead wrote:I went to an accredited technological college of technology, O.K.?



Time to give your degree back... Here's to hoping your major at that tech college was in art or pottery or something. :P

They're talking about AC there... Diodes (like most things) work in closed loop in DC. The main uses for diodes are to act as direction limiters, as fuses in some cases, and to convert AC current into a VERY crude DC (look up Rectifier on your wikipedia). Also, when you split a diode in 2 and attach another diode in the middle, you get a transistor, which has even more fun electrical properties involving DC current flow.

Reality is with LEDs, while they are diodes, they're an odd form of diode. The material they're made of does only let the current flow one way, but it tends to consume a lot more energy than a standard diode since it's emitting light as a side effect. It also tends to have a much lower Wattage tolerance for reverse flow, which means if you put the batteries in backward you'll have smoked the LED within 0.1 seconds of pulling the trigger.

Diodes make great limiters, but LEDS make better fuses.

JohnnyLemonhead


quality posts: 3 Private Messages JohnnyLemonhead
zozzles wrote:A couple of real-life problems with this.

A reverse-biased diode WILL permit what is known as "leakage current" to flow through it. Yes, this current is hugely less that the normal forward-biased situation, but it isn't zero. And, of course, it is in a direction opposite to forward-biased current.

Furthermore, there is a "break-down" voltage for any given diode. Once you impose a voltage higher than it in a reverse-biased condition, basically it doesn't act like a diode anymore. Either it will burn out or it will pass some current substantially larger than its reverse-biased current.

--- to avoid boredom, stop reading here
--- if you are already bored, "Oh well..."

Stupid anecdote: my father-out-law used to work on the beam line at Los Alamos National Laboratory, primarily on the electrical power section.

You might not think of it, but typical "diesel" trains really are electrical: the diesel engine runs at essentially its optimum RPM and runs an alternator whose current goes through a bridge rectifier made up of diodes which then runs the whopping big electrical motors that drive the train.

The diodes involved with those motors, of course, are not small. They are not the teensy little diodes you may have built circuits with if you are a DIY'er or are even tinier within an integrated circuit.

Noper, these deal with excess of 1000 amperes of current per motor at full power & usually two motors are running at a time.

So, basically we are talking about incredibly heavy-duty gear.

My father-out-law made himself rather unpopular with the facility's fire chief: not because he used these sorts of diodes, but because he kept burning them out.

Smoke, fire, noise, no fun at all. Still, I think that my ex's-dad got a blast out of both making that stuff work and what happened when it didn't work.



well of course, as will a resistor, a fuse, etc. of course there is a limit to each diode's current flow. we were debating whether or not a diode is one way current. it is, incidentally. it does not work the same as a lightbulb. it is a diode.

JohnnyLemonhead


quality posts: 3 Private Messages JohnnyLemonhead
woody14619 wrote:Time to give your degree back... Here's to hoping your major at that tech college was in art or pottery or something. :P

They're talking about AC there... Diodes (like most things) work in closed loop in DC. The main uses for diodes are to act as direction limiters, as fuses in some cases, and to convert AC current into a VERY crude DC (look up Rectifier on your wikipedia). Also, when you split a diode in 2 and attach another diode in the middle, you get a transistor, which has even more fun electrical properties involving DC current flow.

Reality is with LEDs, while they are diodes, they're an odd form of diode. The material they're made of does only let the current flow one way, but it tends to consume a lot more energy than a standard diode since it's emitting light as a side effect. It also tends to have a much lower Wattage tolerance for reverse flow, which means if you put the batteries in backward you'll have smoked the LED within 0.1 seconds of pulling the trigger.

Diodes make great limiters, but LEDS make better fuses.



yeah.....again I didn't say anything about power consumption or max power flow, or anything about most of what you just wrote. the fact is current flows one way through a diode and not back the other way. fact. deal with it. that's all I was ever trying to say before you mugs started a wee weeing contest.

woody14619


quality posts: 1 Private Messages woody14619
JohnnyLemonhead wrote:yeah.....again I didn't say anything



No, you said a diode works in an open DC loop. It doesn't. DC requires a closed loop to operate, even for LEDs and diodes.

Just because I point out other interesting facts about diodes doesn't mean what you said was right. You were wrong to say diodes don't return current to the source. They do if they're oriented the correct way, completing the circuit. THIS diode (being a LED) has to complete the loop in order to work. It's a complete, closed loop. If it worked when it was open, the switch would be useless (and the universe would be very, very different).

And really, if we got into a wee wee size contest, I'm really not all that worried. I'm confident in my manhood, and in my degree in computer engineering from Rochester Institute of Technology. So, yeah, I think I know a little bit about this.

JohnnyLemonhead


quality posts: 3 Private Messages JohnnyLemonhead
woody14619 wrote:No, you said a diode works in an open DC loop. It doesn't. DC requires a closed loop to operate, even for LEDs and diodes.

Just because I point out other interesting facts about diodes doesn't mean what you said was right. You were wrong to say diodes don't return current to the source. They do if they're oriented the correct way, completing the circuit. THIS diode (being a LED) has to complete the loop in order to work. It's a complete, closed loop. If it worked when it was open, the switch would be useless (and the universe would be very, very different).

And really, if we got into a wee wee size contest, I'm really not all that worried. I'm confident in my manhood, and in my degree in computer engineering from Rochester Institute of Technology. So, yeah, I think I know a little bit about this.



oh snap you went to R.I.T.
alright brother 'nuff said. I'm going to take the cotton out of my ears and put it in my mouth for a while. I might actually learn something that way.

Mr. Magoo


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Mr. Magoo
Yaweh wrote:Obviously your deeply hurt that something so foul and evil would happen to an owl at night. Oh no! A bright light was aimed at an owl. Someone call PETA!!!!!! Go hug a tree.


BTW, this LED spotlight is decent. Definately worth 15 bucks for two. Batteries last forever in them. I have one and I blind owls to death with it!!!!



Please don't blind or kill anymore owls with your crazy-bright light...

El Gato

GameTraveler


quality posts: 0 Private Messages GameTraveler

Based on other products that use a Luxeon 1W LED, I would think the spotlights here have the following characteristics:


  • 45 Lumen light
  • Projects 100ft. beam of light

similar to their K031G here

crazychinaman


quality posts: 3 Private Messages crazychinaman
naune wrote:Does anyone know if these have single LEDs or do they have the multi-LED "cluster"?


If it's a true Luxeon, then it will only have one bulb, because one bulb is all it's ever gonna need.

greatwhite35 wrote:I really would like to know how far this spot light beam can travel to actually light something up. I use a 55watt/1 million candle power halogen spot on the boat and can light something up and identify an object at over a 100yrds. Does this LED compare and have the gonads to do the same?


It all depends on the shape of the reflector. I have a 1 watt luxeon hand light, and it's got a deep and narrow reflector (about 1.3" deep and .8" across maybe? It's a Streamlight propolymer 4AA luxeon) and I can throw a spot nearly 100 yards away...I was pretty amazed that it came out of an LED light =] Since these are pretty big, i'd guess just from lookin you might get a good spot 50 yards away, but who knows.

- Wooted -

  • Book of Crap 11/4/05
  • Book of Crap 12/25/05
  • Pioneer 1000 Watt 5.1 Surround Sound System
  • Adaptec GameBridge 1440
  • Razer Pro|Tone m100
  • Mio C720T
  • High Peak Sleeping Bagx2
  • Energizer Hardcase Tactical Flashlight
  • Philips Prestigo Remote
  • Screaming Glow-in-the-Dark Monkey with Woot Cape

fongj


quality posts: 1 Private Messages fongj

Flashlight enthusiasts' opinions:
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?t=132648
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?t=149245
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?t=127536
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?t=8202

To sum it up, two years ago they weren't particular impressed for $20 each. Now, its a different story at $14.99 for two, but "Cree" led technology is significantly more efficient (vs. Luxeon).

rightbual


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rightbual
greatwhite35 wrote:I really would like to know how far this spot light beam can travel to actually light something up. I use a 55watt/1 million candle power halogen spot on the boat and can light something up and identify an object at over a 100yrds. Does this LED compare and have the gonads to do the same?



To quote Buzz Lightyear:
"Infinity and beyond"

The intensity is proportional to the power and inversely proportional to the distance. I'd say 10 feet.

dannjenn


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dannjenn

Dude, if your looking for candle power this is not the light for you...its about 54 candlepower. Now compare that to a 1 milliion candle power, it's a about like a AA led mag lite

bombarde


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bombarde


If you're looking for BRIGHT, there are 3 and 5 watt Luxeon assemblies that I use on my motorcycle. Check out superbrightleds.com for more info.

jmste755


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jmste755
epyzero wrote:Black is the absence of color (and is therefore not a color)

White is the blending of all colors and is a color.

you got it the other way around dude



Why must we take "color" into account every time woot tries to cut us deals? Just mentioning this makes us all racists in the eyes of Rainbow/Push.

cindik


quality posts: 5 Private Messages cindik
naune wrote:Does anyone know if these have single LEDs or do they have the multi-LED "cluster"?



It's a Luxeon Star - a single 1W LED.

commodog


quality posts: 4 Private Messages commodog

in for 2.

Here is some feedback from the flashlight experts at candlepowerforums:

http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?t=149245

eyedeal1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages eyedeal1

in 4 3, er 6

vmeeks1022


quality posts: 0 Private Messages vmeeks1022
Gripe wrote:Law of Physics: White the absence of color and black the combination of all colors.



If it's luminous and white, it's a mixture of all wavelengths of visible light.

aobrien73


quality posts: 0 Private Messages aobrien73
Gripe wrote:Law of Physics: White the absence of color and black the combination of all colors.



I believe Gripe is referring to the Law of CRAYOLA Physics. Not being as technical I will paraphrase; if you haven't colored on the paper yet it is white, but if you scribble all over the paper with all 64 crayons it becomes black.

stridermt2k


quality posts: 0 Private Messages stridermt2k

It's a two pack and they show three of them.

That's either shady or stupid or an esoteric combination of the two.

That alone kills it.