abnerr


quality posts: 1 Private Messages abnerr
Crab wrote:Anyone know if one of these will fit over a spark plug?



Yes, the Plastic Molded Carrying Case appears to be about 10"x12" and when opened that size doubles. A spark plug is approximately 1"x 3" so a case this size will cover maybe two dozen spark plugs. The second case will fit over an equal number of plugs doubling the quantity. That's four dozen. 8-)

nickmcmahon


quality posts: 32 Private Messages nickmcmahon
dpicray wrote:These are about as useful as a 1/4 inch drive 20 piece socket set. Oh wait, they're twice as useful because you get two of them.

But seriously, the sockets make good slingshot ammo.



LOL

SRR1138


quality posts: 0 Private Messages SRR1138

I have a 1/4" socket set that can take 400 in/lbs (woot! sold it to me so that has to be a true story, Skil Power Wrench), sure not the handling power of larger sockets and wrenches but really they didn't include 1" sockets with this set either. SO IMHO, this is a fine gift for a person (read male or female) that is going of to college for the first time, and want to build a loft or stuff that college kids build these days.

Besides this is for two sets, I swear woot! had one set for about the same price a month ago or so, maybe I am wrong on that.

PS I love the Skil Power Wrench, so welcome addition to my little tower of tools, really it doesn't suck if you know what/when and the inevitable how to use it.

nickmcmahon


quality posts: 32 Private Messages nickmcmahon
SRR1138 wrote:I have a 1/4" socket set that can take 400 in/lbs (woot! sold it to me so that has to be a true story, Skil Power Wrench), sure not the handling power of larger sockets and wrenches but really they didn't include 1" sockets with this set either. SO IMHO, this is a fine gift for a person (read male or female) that is going of to college for the first time, and want to build a loft or stuff that college kids build these days.

Besides this is for two sets, I swear woot! had one set for about the same price a month ago or so, maybe I am wrong on that.

PS I love the Skil Power Wrench, so welcome addition to my little tower of tools, really it doesn't suck if you know what/when and the inevitable how to use it.


The sockets, on one hand dont normally break to easily, but its the drive that will break. a 1/4" drive isnt much and with a little bit of force the drive can snap right off, been there done that, nuff said.

dpicray


quality posts: 1 Private Messages dpicray

[quote postid="3051805" user="joeparker54"]DEFINTITELY NOT A GOOD PRESENT!!! Ladies, don't embarrass yourself. This set is pointless to own, as it's applications are so limited and light duty.

And not a good gift for any guy with a set (of tools) since he will already have them. (I think I have three or four sets already.)

Get a good set of nut drivers instead.

Scooley01


quality posts: 6 Private Messages Scooley01
Aflaedge wrote:Is the socket wrench 7" or less? I ask because I find myself traveling from time to time for work and when a plane is involved my tools have to be checked. FAA regulations not only prohibit knives and the like, but any tool over 7" in carry on luggage. I like to travel light for work and the whole checked baggage fee is a rip-off when you consider they don't charge fat people. I've been looking for a smallish set of quality socket wrenches and this might just be the ticket.




If that extension is 3" (according to the 'whats in the box') then I'd estimate the wrench to be 5-6".

mnshopper


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mnshopper

Use only on a bicycle that cost you less than $100. 1/4 inch drive--keep the torque down. Maybe that's why you're getting two for Tuesday.

Prime

rgagnon


quality posts: 3 Private Messages rgagnon

LOL... Whomever did the product write-up doesn't know tools much.

Under "In the box", they listed "Two 1/4” Drive Socket 6 Point"

That's not a tool. That's a FEATURE OF ALL THE SOCKETS.

Stanley was nice enough not to count the case as one of the 20pieces in the set. If you count all the other items listed, you get 20.

So people, when you buy this handy set. Don't ask "where is my 1/4" Drive Socket 6-point?" because it's not an element you can count.

zcpeanut


quality posts: 2 Private Messages zcpeanut

Had this set for about 10 years now. Until I got my craftsman set this was all I had. I still use this wrench because I like the switch better on this than my new set!

would definitely buy if you're looking for a really basic or back up set.

Tiahaar


quality posts: 10 Private Messages Tiahaar

This is the perfect set to give your young mechanically talented kid bro or sis (or son/daughter for that matter) to practice their tinkering skills with. My Dad gave me a small set like this years ago and I had the most fun finding out how stuff came apart. Just make sure to set limits on what is available to be tinkered on heheh. This set is also good to replace the tiny sockets that often go missing in a big set. Yeah for real mechanic work you'll need sockets at least to 3/4" for starters.

powerpiglet


quality posts: 6 Private Messages powerpiglet
srb122 wrote:I'm sorry, that was NOT a quality write-up for this product! You're trying too hard to be funny.



And copying Monty Python?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7MstyFwhLy4

TexasTon


quality posts: 0 Private Messages TexasTon
nickmcmahon wrote:They appear to be MM and SAE, a small combination of both. I wouldnt reccomend using these on the car though, as the 1/4" drive on them would break easy. They would be okay for doing some interior work, as the drive would be small and probably wouldn't break when working on the dash, etc, but wouldnt reccomend using on the body or engine.



You either know their limits or you don't. Saturday night I changed oil/filter in my 96 pickup engine and trans-----since you're apparently mechanically minded it's a 350 or to you high tech types, a 5.7l. The trans is a 4l60E. Then last night I dropped the rear end grease out of the rear, and changed the cross pin lockbolt, simple enough? Took out the 3/8" drive plug to refill.

Not one single thing was done with anything but a 1/4" drive ratchet/sockets/and adapters. Someone mentioned spark plugs, all you've got to have is a 1/4 to 3/8 adapter and if a reasonably late model, a 5/8 plug socket. These tapered seat plugs aren't supposed to be torqued over 20 pounds and a 1/4" drive will easily withstand 3 times that.

On heavy stuff I'll frequently break something loose with a larger wrench, then spin it off with 1/4"-----they're tiny/handy/fast and certainly more in place putting tapered seat plugs in, than a 1/2" drive removing 5/32" screw stuff.

Where's the rolleyes button?

dpicray


quality posts: 1 Private Messages dpicray

All kidding aside (as a professional handyman/technician), I said I have three or four sets around already and that's true because they are handy.

They are a must-have addition to a starter tool set. For working on something like a kitchen appliance (to replace a microwave light bulb for example), these are perfect for those little hex screws.

And you could eventually add a breaker bar, a 1/4 to 3/8 adapter, and 3/8 sockets as needed so as to expand their range somewhat.

If you don't already have one then you should get these.

abnerr


quality posts: 1 Private Messages abnerr

I believe this is the same tool shown in use in this video to make fine and intricate
repairs on this very expensive british bicycle.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxfzm9dfqBw

myshack


quality posts: 1 Private Messages myshack
nickmcmahon wrote:Keep in Mind, These have a 1/4" Drive on them, and would not be recomended for much more than putting furniture together. Would'nt buy them to put in the car.



I would have to disagree, a 1/4" drive is more than sufficient for most situations. While you would not want to use this as an impact set with a pneumatic ratchet, they would be appropriate for most household tasks. Besides, most if not all cars come with a standard wrench for changing tires, typically with the jack.

jgwinett


quality posts: 2 Private Messages jgwinett

These are good for household jobs, just keep them inside and when you need a socket it will save you a trip to the garage. In for 1 ...

,Bacon Salt,Breville BES400XL Espresso Machine,Creative Fatal1ty 2020 Laser Mouse
Netgear RangeMax Wireless 2.0 Adapter,Micro Bullet RC Helicopter,Kingston 2GB Micro SD
Laser Level,Kingston 2GB MicroSD,Dazzle DVD Recorder,Versa Wrench 12”Ratcheting Wrench
Ideazon Reaper Gaming Mouse DigiPro Graphics Tablet,Hamilton Beach Ensemble Blender,Everglide S-500 Headphones,Stanley 20 Piece Socket Set,Screaming Monkey
Shut Up and WOOT!

compassstl


quality posts: 30 Private Messages compassstl
nickmcmahon wrote:No, you need a special spark plug socket. Available at parts stores for about $5 or in bigger sets. Plus the 1/4" drive is useless for working on cars. It would break to quickly.



It wouldn't break, necessarily, it'd just be relatively pointless for working on anything other than an air intake or small interior bits, since industrial bolts tend to have larger heads that are more secure and require something bigger and stronger...

Good brand, good for the home do-it-yourselfer. My Stanley impact sockets are holding up better than my Cornwells at about a tenth the price, in a professional setting even!

compassstl


quality posts: 30 Private Messages compassstl
TexasTon wrote:You either know their limits or you don't. Saturday night I changed oil/filter in my 96 pickup engine and trans-----since you're apparently mechanically minded it's a 350 or to you high tech types, a 5.7l. The trans is a 4l60E. Then last night I dropped the rear end grease out of the rear, and changed the cross pin lockbolt, simple enough? Took out the 3/8" drive plug to refill.

Not one single thing was done with anything but a 1/4" drive ratchet/sockets/and adapters. Someone mentioned spark plugs, all you've got to have is a 1/4 to 3/8 adapter and if a reasonably late model, a 5/8 plug socket. These tapered seat plugs aren't supposed to be torqued over 20 pounds and a 1/4" drive will easily withstand 3 times that.

On heavy stuff I'll frequently break something loose with a larger wrench, then spin it off with 1/4"-----they're tiny/handy/fast and certainly more in place putting tapered seat plugs in, than a 1/2" drive removing 5/32" screw stuff.

Where's the rolleyes button?



Heehee, well said.

brownie47


quality posts: 0 Private Messages brownie47

Stanley makes some nice quality inexpensive tools that work well for someone who knows how to use tools. Most folks think that if it fits the fastener then they should be able to use that tool to remove it. Not always the case even with larger, more expensive tools. Any tool will break when subjected to too much force and knowing when to stop and get something else is what keeps you from breaking tools. 1/4" drive is perfect for most jobs that a non-mechanic will be doing on their car, boat, etc.

tesla33


quality posts: 57 Private Messages tesla33

"You either know their limits or you don't. Saturday night I changed oil/filter in my 96 pickup engine and trans-----since you're apparently mechanically minded it's a 350 or to you high tech types, a 5.7l. The trans is a 4l60E. Then last night I dropped the rear end grease out of the rear, and changed the cross pin lockbolt, simple enough? Took out the 3/8" drive plug to refill."

These are most likely parts that have been removed and replaced before by you, with the right amount of torque, and are lubricated and rust-free. Try using a 1/4" drive on a typical old car in the Rust Belt, and you'll quickly find its limits.

GreasyCoffee


quality posts: 1 Private Messages GreasyCoffee

Yea, i was looking through the posts just now to see if anyone mentioned that.. lol

Two 1/4” Drive Socket 6 Point

I even counted the tools to see The breadsticks need marinara! they were talking about... like that little round plastic piece u slip on the ratchet... but there isnt one... youre right, they didnt know much about tools.

rgagnon wrote:LOL... Whomever did the product write-up doesn't know tools much.

Under "In the box", they listed "Two 1/4” Drive Socket 6 Point"

That's not a tool. That's a FEATURE OF ALL THE SOCKETS.

Stanley was nice enough not to count the case as one of the 20pieces in the set. If you count all the other items listed, you get 20.

So people, when you buy this handy set. Don't ask "where is my 1/4" Drive Socket 6-point?" because it's not an element you can count.



MichaelSF


quality posts: 92 Private Messages MichaelSF
nickmcmahon wrote:Keep in Mind, These have a 1/4" Drive on them, and would not be recommended for much more than putting furniture together. Wouldn't buy them to put in the car.



This is exactly right. I was working on my car and taking off a stubborn nut.

Was using a 1/4" drive and an extension. Snapped the extension nice and clean like.

While the extension looked sharp (called "chromalloy" or something bogus like that). While it was a $25 el cheapo set, I suspect the 1/4" drive was way too weak for what I was doing.

But these kinds of sets are great for light duty stuff around the house (inside stuff). I don't think anything but a 1/2" drive belongs near a car.



GreasyCoffee


quality posts: 1 Private Messages GreasyCoffee

OK, so this IS a good 1/4" Drive socket set. It's a LOT better quality than those cheapo sets you get and will get the job done with less breakage. BUT, this should just be part of your socket arsenal. You should also have a medium duty 3/8" drive socket set, and a 1/2" Drive socket set with breaker bar for those heavy jobs like changing wheel bearings, etc. This set is not going to do EVERY job. Good judgement as to what size rachet/socket should be used. Basically, I would use a 3/8" drive set to BREAK LOOSE rusted bolts and this smaller set to finish the job.

HaXXeD


quality posts: 1 Private Messages HaXXeD

Great, AFTER I buy it I realize that it's 1/4" oh well, I've got 2 socket sets I'll never use now!

stevedog1


quality posts: 6 Private Messages stevedog1

Great for working on yer motorcycle! In fer two, um.. four!! Wooot!!

wajames


quality posts: 0 Private Messages wajames

In for a 2 pack.

This is a solid woot. I got one of these sets last fall at Wallyworld for the 18 bucks.

And ... I got the 54 piece set in the Baggy.

I still wooted this one, since either:

I'm horny for tools

or

I figger I have enough tool challenged relatives

or

I don't have to deal with warrranty exchanges when I abuse the ones I do have.

Or...

(I know, I know, never start a sentence with a conjunction such as "Or or And")

I'm horny for tools. But, I repeat myself.

In any event (horizon?), as has been posted, there are many uses for a 1/4" drive set just as there are for 3/8", 1/2", 3/4", and 1".

(And (sic) I digress into wondering what KippyJ's husband is contemplating using the 3/4" inch drive guppy set for????)
http://www.woot.com/Forums/ViewPost.aspx?PostID=3043905

I mean how many 200+ foot-pound nuts can there be roaming around her house?

FauxReal


quality posts: 4 Private Messages FauxReal

You could use these on your kids' bikes, assembling the jungle gym and assembling your hobby robot.

You'll have to upgrade if you're planning on building anything lethal.

Coming on strong with some hardcore power...

bigomighty


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bigomighty

good price, but too small for my needs...

zozzles


quality posts: 6 Private Messages zozzles

Woot sez:
"Our Staff Translator has found an original copy of The Story Of Goldilocks And The Three Bears, and he’s translated it from the original German, with no edits or changes."

Which just goes to show you how uninformed the woot staff is. Nearly all of the stories that the Brothers Grimm came up with while living in Kassel were re-tellings of some French guy's work which -supposedly- he got wandering from village to village, speaking to the old "wise women". There are almost NO stories in any of the usual fairy tales that originated in Germany.

FreshMint


quality posts: 0 Private Messages FreshMint

Using these on a car would be fine as long as you're not applying 200ft/lbs of torque onto the thing to brake bolt loose on your ford festiva

skizzy


quality posts: 3 Private Messages skizzy

Hey, for 8 bucks this is a great deal..
I mess around with classic cars, got 9 right now..
You will be able to do just about any roadside repair with these and a couple of screwdrivers..
Whishever car I'm driving, my tools always seem to be in another one!
In for tw0 (4) sets..
Will just leave em in the trunk..

PJKOCHIS


quality posts: 0 Private Messages PJKOCHIS

I have a similar set from Sears that is many years old, in fact it used to be my fathers. Over the years a socket here and there was replaced with some off brand and recently the case broke so the sockets and handles are all over the place, and it is held together with a rubber band.I have been looking for a new case to put the set into, and I can not find an appropriate case for the price of one of these sets.

Petad

gotbiat33


quality posts: 0 Private Messages gotbiat33

In for two. My bag of random woot gifts is getting too lite since I gave away my last heavy, super-multi wrench.

justagigilo85


quality posts: 9 Private Messages justagigilo85
Crab wrote:Anyone know if one of these will fit over a spark plug?



Even if it did fit, you'd want a socket with a rubber cap inside it so there's a lesser chance of breaking the spark plug's insulator.

norm401


quality posts: 1 Private Messages norm401

There good, there bad, make up your mind. The long and short of it...If your a handyman (cars or other things) and you don't have a 1/4 drive set, then you're not a handyman! Most likely you break more things than you fix.
Don't even think about arguing with me.

rcpd34


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rcpd34

Bought this the last time around. It's junk. Bad Woot.

314edpiper


quality posts: 1 Private Messages 314edpiper

Not bad, but the price is more average than discount. The ratchet is the "dollar general" or "wal-mart" type. If the ratchet were the "tear-drop" style, this would be a woot worthy deal.

Pass, but with a second look.

I would say 'Good day,' but 'SUCK IT" sounds better...

314edpiper


quality posts: 1 Private Messages 314edpiper
norm401 wrote:There good, there bad, make up your mind. The long and short of it...If your a handyman (cars or other things) and you don't have a 1/4 drive set, then you're not a handyman! Most likely you break more things than you fix.
Don't even think about arguing with me.



No argument here. I am an ASE certified mechanic in STL. I use 1/4 all the time, and I break them all the time. When I go to buy a set the 1st thing I look at is the ratchet because that is the part I don't want breaking in my hand.

I would say 'Good day,' but 'SUCK IT" sounds better...

OHFireRescue


quality posts: 0 Private Messages OHFireRescue

In for the deal. I need a 1/4 drive. Looked at a Kobalt at Lowes last week and they want 10 bucks for the ratchet. I don't need the sockets but they are the right size for cordless screwdriver and an extra set can always come in handy. One set in garage, one set out in storage shed for small engine and bike use without walking all the way to the house (except not suitable for changing lawn mower blades for the gorillas who apply enough torque to break ratchets). I've never broken a ratchet, but have rounded off a cheap extension and a couple of cheap sockets.

A bandolier of carrots would be appreciated about now

Cisco1081


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Cisco1081

Obviously, the people on here are completely clueless about 1/4" drive. Im an aircraft mechanic for a major airline and I only carry 1/4" drive in my tool box because this works for about 90% of the jobs on an airplane.(I dont carry all of my tools all over the airport) Of course this is not going to fit the adjustment pulley on a serpentine belt, but it will do most of the work on a car.