WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

If you're the sort of person who reads our blogs and our writeups, especially on a busy Woot-Off day like today, we assume you like the written word. So we think you might enjoy this poem by Christian Wiman. Of course, we don't have any reprint rights, and it's too short to really claim fair use, so we're not going to offend anyone by putting it up on our blog. Instead, we'll just tell you to follow our link and we'll hope you enjoy that poem as much as we did.

And for those of you who don't care about poems, we offer this.

 



Quality Posts


andy77


quality posts: 1 Private Messages andy77

Nice-thanks for the link.

fait


quality posts: 16 Private Messages fait

Wow - he's really got a way with expression!



(I'm not telling which link I clicked on.)

meestergud


quality posts: 2 Private Messages meestergud

I feel cheated because I expected references to M.C. Hammer and his song about prayer.

MeesterGud

rtshinn


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rtshinn

Nice poem.
I do like the Wootr write-ups.
You guys ever hear of nanowrimo?

Slydon


quality posts: 16 Private Messages Slydon

Staff

meestergud wrote:I feel cheated because I expected references to M.C. Hammer and his song about prayer.



Somebody didn't look at all the links, did he now?

Hi, I'm one of the writers. My powers are limited but I'll do what I can.

sewmommy


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sewmommy

Oh how we love thee, Hammer. I wonder if it is a clue from woot about some upcoming Hammer Pants on the wootoff.

kcmark


quality posts: 25 Private Messages kcmark

Someone want to share how the last 2 stanzas of this poem are connected with the first 3 in any meaningful way? I appreciate people that can turn a word or a phrase but there still has to be some connection of words to words, thoughts to thoughts, or ideas to ideas. If not, I might as well write some whimsical, esoteric or poignant unrelated verses and have my screaming monkey randomly throw them together and call it a poem.

Maybe I'm just not seeing it after being woken up by 2 of 3 kids throughout the night last night. If so, enlighten me.

beckyeas


quality posts: 1 Private Messages beckyeas
kcmark wrote:Someone want to share how the last 2 stanzas of this poem are connected with the first 3 in any meaningful way?



So this is how I read it, recognizing that poems can be interpreted in so many ways.

I picture a person (a man, given the picture that accompanies the poem), who is rebuilding a home that has been wrecked by some natural disaster. I'm from Kansas, so I go with tornados, but pick your disaster of choice. And, as happens sometimes in these situations, this person is wondering just where God is in the face of this disaster. He finds no consolation in reaching out to God, or in praying.

But then, just as he expresses this, peace comes to him, like dust settling when a wind dies. You can choose to think that the peace comes because he has given up on looking to God for answers. Or you can choose to think that this peace IS the answer. But regardless, somewhere in the back of his mind, there is now peace.

It's quite lovely, really. Thanks, Woot.

harvey4dummies


quality posts: 0 Private Messages harvey4dummies

I don't get it.

I was expecting something from Peter Paul and Mary.

Amblyopia


quality posts: 2 Private Messages Amblyopia

too deep for me...

but the video really takes me back... hehe...

--Amblyopia

tylersaurus


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tylersaurus

makes my brain hurt.

Olphart


quality posts: 2 Private Messages Olphart

I'm glad some of you guys find coherent thought in the poem...for me it was just another case of obscurity not equalling profoundity.

andy77


quality posts: 1 Private Messages andy77
kcmark wrote:Someone want to share how the last 2 stanzas of this poem are connected with the first 3 in any meaningful way?



I agree with beckyeas. I think that is a good explanation/description of the poem.

Obviously, poems can require some interpretation and thought to find the author's meaning, and one's understanding may be different than another's, or the author's.

McGurk


quality posts: 5 Private Messages McGurk

If I had a hammer, I'd hammer in the morning. I'd hammer in the evening. I'd hammer out danger. I'd hammer out a warning.



Well, I've got a hammer. It's the hammer of justice.

unclejoeyv


quality posts: 6 Private Messages unclejoeyv

I choose neither.

bhallidayjr


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bhallidayjr
unclejoeyv wrote:I choose neither.



And I, the opposite.

Gravity is always on.

indeeme


quality posts: 1 Private Messages indeeme
beckyeas wrote:So this is how I read it, recognizing that poems can be interpreted in so many ways.

I picture a person (a man, given the picture that accompanies the poem), who is rebuilding a home that has been wrecked by some natural disaster. I'm from Kansas, so I go with tornados, but pick your disaster of choice. And, as happens sometimes in these situations, this person is wondering just where God is in the face of this disaster. He finds no consolation in reaching out to God, or in praying.

But then, just as he expresses this, peace comes to him, like dust settling when a wind dies. You can choose to think that the peace comes because he has given up on looking to God for answers. Or you can choose to think that this peace IS the answer. But regardless, somewhere in the back of his mind, there is now peace.

It's quite lovely, really. Thanks, Woot.



The first thing that came to mind as I read the title was that Christ was a carpenter. I imagine the first three stanzas as His thoughts as he aids the poor. In the wind coming to rest, the dust settling, I think that's His death.

"Peace came to the hinterlands of OUR minds" (not his).

klozitshoper


quality posts: 2 Private Messages klozitshoper

Somehow not at all uplifting. May be my mood tonight, but it really did not do much more than make me more tired than I already was.

Slydon


quality posts: 16 Private Messages Slydon

Staff

No matter if you liked it or not, I'm very pleased that a whole bunch of people who don't usually post on the blog are now discussing a poem together. Maybe we'll try to do this more often now that we know you're out there!

Hi, I'm one of the writers. My powers are limited but I'll do what I can.

druss


quality posts: 0 Private Messages druss
beckyeas wrote:So this is how I read it, recognizing that poems can be interpreted in so many ways.
It's quite lovely, really. Thanks, Woot.



Wow! Outstanding! I completely misread each line, not noticing the connections/disconnections. I appreciate the help...

I originally *virulently* disliked the poem, but can appreiate it after your help.

beckyeas


quality posts: 1 Private Messages beckyeas
Slydon wrote:No matter if you liked it or not, I'm very pleased that a whole bunch of people who don't usually post on the blog are now discussing a poem together. Maybe we'll try to do this more often now that we know you're out there!



I'm one of your lurkers who buys on occasion, but reads the posts pretty faithfully. So I'd love more poetry! What a fun respite in the middle of the Wootoff insanity!

madfrisbee


quality posts: 6 Private Messages madfrisbee

Mr. Lydon, I must thank you for introducing me to Christian Wiman's work. After I read the poem and appreciated beckyeas and indeeme's takes on it, I followed the link in the article to another Wiman poem. I love the flow of the verse, and its circular continuity and searching wistfulness. I then had a lovely hour or so of internet distraction wherein I found this essay by Wiman, and this one.

I gotta say, Scott, this sublime distraction wasn't what I expected when I clicked the Woot blog link yesterday. I was expecting more funny, fluffy social satire. You tricked me into an intellectual pursuit. Devious...

Slydon


quality posts: 16 Private Messages Slydon

Staff

madfrisbee wrote:I gotta say, Scott, this sublime distraction wasn't what I expected when I clicked the Woot blog link yesterday. I was expecting more funny, fluffy social satire. You tricked me into an intellectual pursuit. Devious...



As Dolly Parton once said, it takes a lot of work to look this cheap!

Hi, I'm one of the writers. My powers are limited but I'll do what I can.

dave bug


quality posts: 14 Private Messages dave bug

This is my new favorite poem:
--
I have eaten
the plums
that were in
the icebox

and which
you were probably
saving
for breakfast

Forgive me
they were delicious
so sweet
and so cold

- William Carlos Williams

lightningstriker


quality posts: 0 Private Messages lightningstriker

Listen to that MC Hammer song and take note of the "dun-dah-dun, dun dun dah-dun" in the background of the chorus. Doesn't that sound an awful lot like "When The Doves Cry" by Prince?

Forgive me if it's already been mentioned, I didn't read anything past the poetry critiquing jargon.