heyjoie


quality posts: 8 Private Messages heyjoie

My dad tried these with tomatoes and cucumbers last year--he even built a special stand for them to hang from. They didn't do well and he's sworn off the things. Based on our experience: If you do try them, be prepared to have to water them OFTEN.

texaslynn


quality posts: 0 Private Messages texaslynn
jim5554 wrote:...The plants look nothing like the ads. ... The bottom line is this. Tomato plants were designed by nature to grow up, not down. The plant expends too much energy trying to correct this and becomes spindly and weak.



My experience was EXACTLY like this. Don't waste you money... buy a pot.

bundarules


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bundarules

These things are a scam. I tried them last year. The plants turn upward as soon as they are strong enough and since their roots are above the plant for quite a while the tops have a hard time getting nutrients and water. This stunts their growth and they put more effort into growing leaves than fruit. Don't waste your money. If you really want super gorgeous tomatoes i suggest planting your tomato plants long ways in a trough dug about 6-8 inches deep. Tomatoes can root anywhere along their main stem so planting them like this will produce several secondary stems. In essence, you will get several fully mature plants to produce tomatoes from just one tomato plant. Don't over water, never get water on the leaves, use a fertilizer specifically for tomatoes, use sevin powder once a month to keep bugs at bay and prune off any stems that do not produce flowers. Last year my potted tomatoes (not these) produced some that weighed over a pound a piece...

Assassin15


quality posts: 161 Private Messages Assassin15

Does anyone know if those slicers actually work? If you've ever sliced a tomato, you know you need something rather sharp, elsewise the tomato kind of gets smushed. And from the picture, that slicer does NOT look sharp.

PULL UP YOUR SKIRT, WE'RE ON A MISSION/
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Courtney610


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Courtney610

I love my topsy turvey planters! I have 2 tomato planters, a strawberry planter, and a hot pepper planter. My yard gets a ton of shade, so I love that I can grow things on my deck. I love them! you have to really keep up with watering them, but other than that, they are so simple to use!

bundarules


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bundarules
eabbott wrote:Topsy Turvy not staying moist enough? Sounds like you need the other "as seen on tv" product, The Aqua Globe!



Another scam...they don't work...gravity gets in the way

thomasr


quality posts: 6 Private Messages thomasr

Before buying look up the process of "positive phototropism" as it applies to vegetable growth.

smitty8


quality posts: 3 Private Messages smitty8

My Grandma got these a year or two ago and said they are just ok. The hardest part for her was trying to get it hung up after adding dirt to it, which makes it really heavy for someone her age. I won't buy any because I am allergic to tomatoes. Other than that, it looks like a good price for those interested in the novelty of the product.

monty86


quality posts: 0 Private Messages monty86

Quite frankly I have not heard one good thing about these planters. Friends have bought them and they do not work well. The soil dries out very quickly and there is not enough soil for the roots. You are much better off to plant the tomato in the ground!

nmumark


quality posts: 10 Private Messages nmumark

There is a house i drive by that just uses 5 Gallon platic buckets and cuts a hole in the bottom. It seems to work pretty well, plus i would assume they would last alot longer.

aamt4ever


quality posts: 0 Private Messages aamt4ever
Greshmahg wrote:To those asking the difference between these and the strawberry ones or if you can grow other things in them:

The tomato one is a vinyl sack with a big hole in the bottom that you put 2 tomato plants.

The strawberry one is a vinyl sack with about 15 holes cut in the sides of it that you stuff strawberry bushes.

Conceivably, you should be able to grow things like cucumbers, pumpkins, zucchini, watermelons, etc. out of the tomato ones if you put them close enough to the ground. And in theory, you should be able to grow things like jalapenos and other fruit bearing bushy things out of the strawberry ones.

But again, they didn't work for me at all. This year, I spent 60 bucks on a 4 tiered growhouse from Lowe's and got some planter boxes.

I mean think about this: I live in Seattle, Washington. The lushest, greenest state in the entire country. You could plant a bat turd and something would grow out of the ground up here, yet I couldn't get anything to grow out of these.



Guanoble ;)

lakecity


quality posts: 0 Private Messages lakecity

Tried this last year (in central Texas) and it was a complete failure. It may be too hot here to have the dirt above ground baking in the sun.

regimom88


quality posts: 0 Private Messages regimom88

You can't put seeds in these! You have to use plants, at the very least a pretty mature seedling. And don't hang it with a nail!! It'll fall out!! Use a hook that screws into your overhang. Good grief common sense, people.

Rtrblade


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Rtrblade

Plants all grow toward the sun which obviously is up. The photos show the plants growing straight down. When I tried these, the plants tried to grow up and as the tomatoes got larger, the branches broke, ruining the fruit prior to it being ripe enough to pick. The only ones that worked reasonably well were cherry tomatoes, however the stands for these growers are so flimsy that the stand eventually collapsed and killed that plant as well. Also, if you plan to use them in a subsequent year, the plants get so rootbound in the container that there is no way to get the old plant out without destroying the container. Good Luck!!!

mg578


quality posts: 1 Private Messages mg578
regimom88 wrote:You can't put seeds in these! You have to use plants, at the very least a pretty mature seedling. And don't hang it with a nail!! It'll fall out!! Use a hook that screws into your overhang. Good grief common sense, people.



Yikes! Chill!

conbat18


quality posts: 0 Private Messages conbat18
VeloSteve wrote:Ours disintegrated in the sun - and what good is a tomato plant in the shade?


Yep mime fell apart in the sun and a tomato plant planted in a pot on the ground grew 5 times bigger and faster. These things are a scam....

homersmrt


quality posts: 0 Private Messages homersmrt
jim5554 wrote:I've tried them. To make it a fair test I did it for two consecutive years... These things are a waste of money. The sun also does a number on them. That's why my test was 2 years instead of 3.


I concur. Tried the system 2 years in a row with poor results - a waste of time. Regular watering resulted in sickly stunted yellowing looking plants.

Don M Jackson

reedstrm


quality posts: 0 Private Messages reedstrm
charva1 wrote:If you have issues with the soil drying out, I suggest mixing in some of ploymer crystals into the soil. They absorb 10 times there volume in water and slowly release it back into the soil. However, be careful not to use too many, as they expand to 10 their size when they've fully absorbed water. Do a google search for Polymer crystals, or ask your local nursery.


Or, cut open a high absorbency diaper. Same stuff, chemically. Do NOT recommend a used diaper, even though it would seem to come pre-fertilized.

gee2thek


quality posts: 0 Private Messages gee2thek
sc4bbk wrote:No.These are for TOMATOES.

They are both red but they aren't compatible AT ALL! DON'T even try it.



....someone missed the pun-boat....

--- Life is a dream for the wise, a game for the fool, a comedy for the rich, a tragedy for the poor.

eyedeal1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages eyedeal1

I didn't look at all the posts, but they are $2 cheaper on deals.woot

rosaluxe


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rosaluxe

These are far flimsier than the ones I got from Gardener's Supply, and I'm told they CONSTANTLY dry out. I would cautiously recommend the Gardener's Supply bags, that come with a metal
cage and better instructions. They cost more, but the topsy turvy's just don't cut it.

spicedrum


quality posts: 1 Private Messages spicedrum

My mom has used one of these the past 2 summers with patio tomato plants (you need to make sure your tomato variety is suited for container gardening), and they've been beautiful plants with bumper crops of tasty tomatoes. She hangs them on a shepherd's hook in the front yard.

oldgal3


quality posts: 3 Private Messages oldgal3
TechGuy125 wrote:Topsy Turvy from walgreens and walmart just terrible. Defiantly do not work well.

http://www.viewpoints.com/Topsy-Turvy-Upside-Down-Tomato-Planter-review-663c4#



And no one wants defiant vegetables or fruits.

kitlemmonds


quality posts: 1 Private Messages kitlemmonds

I used these a couple of seasons for tomatoes and peppers and found the concept problematic due to limited sunlight. Unless you're lucky enough to have a sturdy, lone pole in your yard, you'll probably be hanging this from a deck corner or other overhang. Unfortunately any overhang creates shade for a majority of the day (and 100% of the day for the backside of the planter). I used two deck corners that I noted had sunlight on the ground beneath them for at least half the day. The tomato plant formed thick, split stalks and very few fruit. The pepper only produced two fruit. This despite the heavy presence of pollinators. It seemed that most blooms simply fell off instead of setting to fruit. I would have probably done better planting in regular 5 gallon buckets on top of the deck. I suspect the tomato spent most of its energy chasing sunlight instead of producing fruit - especially considering the wind would sometimes spin the vigorous "sun" side to constant shade.

FranklinS


quality posts: 2 Private Messages FranklinS

Don't plant zucchini in these. If left unattended, they can actually take over your neighborhood.

tiptopus


quality posts: 1 Private Messages tiptopus

Make sure you hang them up with a strong support hook. They weigh a ton after you water them. Does not stop pesky squirrels from raiding your bounty. We didn't like them so we went back to the good old garden soil in NJ.

FranklinS


quality posts: 2 Private Messages FranklinS

OK, this is what your choices are: Buy these topsy turvy gizmos, make a stand for them, buy the topsoil and plants, put it together, water it, chase the deer away, protect it from the wind, keep the grandkids from yanking the leaves, don't walk or back into it,OR, go the the garden store, buy some Rapid Gro and give it to a neighbor that has a nice vegetable garden. Your neighbor will love your gift and in short order you will be getting more tomatoes than you can shake a stick at.

ignernt


quality posts: 3 Private Messages ignernt
Assassin15 wrote:Does anyone know if those slicers actually work? If you've ever sliced a tomato, you know you need something rather sharp, elsewise the tomato kind of gets smushed. And from the picture, that slicer does NOT look sharp.



Looks like "slicer" is a misnomer in this case, they are more of a guide. You put the tomato in the slicer to hold it then use a knife to slice through it. Fark's looking out for us, allowing us to keep our full complement of digits.

70 Woots, 15 Sellouts, 21 KidWoots, 1 Shirt, 3 Random Shirts

Skotyman


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Skotyman

I've had good yields from these(look for plants that say "good for containers") but the tomatoes were confused and angry at being raised in basically a state of torture, and when you eat them you get a dizzy disoriented sensation. (I think it's revenge).

kreeker


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kreeker

As already said building it the first time you must water the soil after every couple of inches of dirt to hydrate the soil. It takes close to a gallon of water a day and fertilize weekly with Miracle-Gro. After three weeks the plant is doing very well and has a dozen blooms.

Sully2001


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Sully2001
eabbott wrote:Topsy Turvy not staying moist enough? Sounds like you need the other "as seen on tv" product, The Aqua Globe!



HAHA!

smittymoo


quality posts: 0 Private Messages smittymoo
bundarules wrote:Another scam...they don't work...gravity gets in the way



Not true... I have a couple of these for inside plants and they work as advertised (Aqua globe)

sdean


quality posts: 1 Private Messages sdean

They worked but.......
Tomatoes require steady, even watering and a lot of it, at *least* once a day and never, ever, miss a watering...there's not enough soil in these. I can't get my family to water stuff reliably when I am away, and so these didn't work for me. If you were retired and never left your house during the growing season they'd be great, but...
A plant that requires less watering and will tolerate sporadic watering (tomatoes break open in a line from hydrostatic pressure if you give them a lot of water after being droughted) like maybe peppers might work fine. I am about to try a variant of these for strawberries and see how that goes....

tommy2rs


quality posts: 4 Private Messages tommy2rs

I've had four of these for three years. The same four. No rotting, no falling. I also got the plant hanger made for them. I grow cherry and grape tomatoes on the deck right outside the kitchen door. I went with these so I could have them on the deck and not have the dang cats laying all over them. Note: These are semi-feral cats that I'd normally shoot on sight but they do keep the rodents, snakes and bugs down, so we lay down just enough cat kibble to keep them hanging around.

Yep they are heavy, damn heavy, when fully loaded. I use half potting soil and half compost, water them daily when I feed the animals and harvest a ton of salad tomatoes. They haven't rotted or fallen and used correctly, produce well even when the plants get leggy in the fall.

When the season is done, usually October,I clean them out and store them in the shed.

There's nothing more exhilarating than pointing out the shortcomings of others, is there? -- Randal Graves, "Clerks"

timmyvee


quality posts: 7 Private Messages timmyvee

My idea would be to hang a few from a clothesline, grease up the clothesline to keep the squirrels off and maybe, just maybe I will get to eat a tomato instead of finding half eaten ones all over my backyard.

mehtars


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mehtars

I wonder if you could just use a 2 liter bottle of coke that is cut from the bottom to do the same thing.

bbigham


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bbigham

These are okay but they get VERY VERY heavy when filled with soil, water and a plant. Almost impossible to hang in place alone. One friend hung one from a gazebo and it brought the whole thing down. Not easy to water.

My advice: get a pot instead.

ediblegod


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ediblegod
mehtars wrote:I wonder if you could just use a 2 liter bottle of coke that is cut from the bottom to do the same thing.



I did that last year and it worked fairly well... got a bunch of cherry tomatoes. Only drawback is it is clear and the roots spend too much time dodging the sun instead of producing. You could always wrap it with something though.

pealo99


quality posts: 1 Private Messages pealo99

Is it just me, or do those "tomato slicers" look like medieval torture devices designed to seize a man by the stones?

baricat


quality posts: 0 Private Messages baricat
mrfox2 wrote:Yes. If you do use it indoors, make sure to put something below it to catch the excess water/soil runoff. Also make sure it gets adequate sunlight.



Not just adequate light, but you will have to pollinate the flowers yourself, since you won't have an wind or bees to do the job for you. If you don't, the flowers will just wither and fall off with no tomatoes.