csl312


quality posts: 4 Private Messages csl312

Thanks for the quick responses about PDFs. I am in physics so it is a lot of charts/graphs. I dont like reading on LCD screens, so that is why I too many cookies to go the tablet route but thought an e-ink device could save some trees instead of printing out all the articles I read. I guess I will have to wait and hope the next gen has better PDF support.

Watcher95


quality posts: 10 Private Messages Watcher95
vladistov wrote:After experiencing touch-screen features on my Sony Reader, there is simply no way I'd settle for any Kindle at this phase of their release scheme. Aside from the obvious advantages, using a stylus simply feels more natural. The Sony is not without its wants; but it sure seems strange that we've had the PDA with stylus for years and seen so little touch options carried over into the e-readers. Actually, it's not strange at all--simply more profitable.



I don't understand this post.

What is the "obvious advantage"

How does a stylus feel more natural than a finger?

Have you noticed that stylusesess(plural of stylus) have pretty much dropped off the earth for all other forms of handheld devices?

Personally, I would rather brush my finger on the edge of the device to change the page(which is easily 99%+ of the interface actions people make with these devices) than have to pick up a piece of plastic and poke at the screen

sdc100


quality posts: 497 Private Messages sdc100
tvman wrote:I have a nook and I love it. Eink is not exclusive to kindle and the best thing about nook is the ability to use epub library books. Every Friday they give you a book for free too. Plus the Barnes & Noble prices on ebooks is great. They always have lots of sales etc.



While it's true that eInk is used by other makers like Sony, Entourage, Barnes and Nobles (although they've d/c the eInk Nook) and a few Chinese brands, only the Kindle uses the latest version: EInk Pearl.

EInk Pearl offers 50% higher contrast and I believe, slightly faster speed. Only the Kindle 3 has it. This Kindle 2 uses the previous version of eInk,

Watcher95


quality posts: 10 Private Messages Watcher95
csl312 wrote:Thanks for the quick responses about PDFs. I am in physics so it is a lot of charts/graphs. I dont like reading on LCD screens, so that is why I too many cookies to go the tablet route but thought an e-ink device could save some trees instead of printing out all the articles I read. I guess I will have to wait and hope the next gen has better PDF support.



It's not that the PDF support is bad per se, it's just that for formatting/image complexity of PDF files are often poorly suited for this smaller screen.

10th gen kindles (with screens the same size) will probably still be poor tools for PDF

ryancooke


quality posts: 3 Private Messages ryancooke

I think I'll pick this up for a graduation gift!
Can you use this with college textbooks? If it saves me money on textbooks I'll definitely get it!

KyserSoze


quality posts: 18 Private Messages KyserSoze

It be better if you could add a micro/mini sd card for storage of mp3's, other than that I might buy one.

donatoclassic


quality posts: 0 Private Messages donatoclassic

How well does this read PDFs?

stinhoutx


quality posts: 11 Private Messages stinhoutx

Side deal note YMMV:

Kindle with Special Offers (3rd gen, wi-fi only) is $114. One of the current special offers is to get the Amazon Rewards Credit Card and Get a $100 Amazon Gift Card.

I already had the Rewards Card so no go for me. But potentially, if you do not have the Card, it would seem you could buy, or be gifted, a Kindle SO, sign up for the card, and walk away with the Kindle SO for $14.

Another note:

I use the Kindle SO browser to read books via web on Books24x7. I haven't figured out how to get into my Safari Online account (via ACM), yet.

masshuum


quality posts: 18 Private Messages masshuum
csl312 wrote:Thanks for the quick responses about PDFs. I am in physics so it is a lot of charts/graphs. I dont like reading on LCD screens, so that is why I too many cookies to go the tablet route but thought an e-ink device could save some trees instead of printing out all the articles I read. I guess I will have to wait and hope the next gen has better PDF support.



Eh, trees are a renewable resource when managed properly (which they are for the most part in the U.S) so don't worry too much about that part =P

The Kindle uses nonrenewable oils and chemicals to make its plastic and electronics. Plus it's not very recyclable.

But then logging uses gas and causes pollution among other things.

But laser printers have been known to cause health problems if you're nearby while printing and they're made of more plastic than the Kindle and most inks aren't environmentally sound....

What...? How do I..

*screams and faints*



Oh but yeah, hopefully one day there'll be a reader that handles PDFs and graphics much better. I'd really love to replace textbooks and encyclopedias with a device that can handle it and be have a more intuitive user interface for such massive tomes of knowledge.

MasterYogurt


quality posts: 7 Private Messages MasterYogurt
csl312 wrote:I am considering picking up an e-reader one of these days but as a grad student am going to be reading a lot of journal articles, so I need one that has very good pdf reading function. The book thing is just a bonus to me really. Is the 2nd gen kindle good at this? If not what e-reader is (are there any? everything I have found online has been ambiguous about pdf reading on e-readers).




I can answer this really well, as a grad student who reads a lot of PDFs. I don't think it's that great, and I have the Kindle 3. The main issue is that PDF text can't reflow. Reading the whole page makes the text too small to read for extended periods (though it's legible), so you're stuck zooming in to read. This is often finicky, though, and makes reading multiple columns (not typically an issue) incredibly difficult. Furthermore, sometimes you can't get get it to zoom correctly at all, and moving the page back and forth is an absolute pain. It always feels like a halfway solution, and that's with the version that is supposedly GOOD at it.

You actually can underline and annotate PDFs, typically, but it's rather slow. In fact, I don't like my Kindle for academic reading at all because I find that it's far too linear. I tend to want to refer back and forth, but the Kindle experience isn't dynamic. I love that it syncs my notes, but I don't take serious notes on it because of the time involved and the fact that I find academic reading (continually annotating, flipping and underlining) tedious. You might read differently than I, but if you're interested in PDF reading first and foremost this is not the device for you. It's more of a "bonus" than a selling point.

masshuum


quality posts: 18 Private Messages masshuum
donatoclassic wrote:How well does this read PDFs?



About as well as you check the forums for previously asked questions.


In short, not very well =P

jeffdoh


quality posts: 6 Private Messages jeffdoh
plaster wrote:Yes it has e-ink technology. All the kindles have e-ink. It has been their main selling point since they came out.



I think you misunderstood Plaster's question. He was asking if the 2nd generation e-ink was as good as the 3rd, and it is not. 3rd generation e-ink is about 50% stronger/better then the 2nd gen.

But I have the 2nd gen and it's just fine...

Jeffrey Lax

MasterYogurt


quality posts: 7 Private Messages MasterYogurt
Watcher95 wrote:I don't understand this post.

What is the "obvious advantage"

How does a stylus feel more natural than a finger?

Have you noticed that stylusesess(plural of stylus) have pretty much dropped off the earth for all other forms of handheld devices?

Personally, I would rather brush my finger on the edge of the device to change the page(which is easily 99%+ of the interface actions people make with these devices) than have to pick up a piece of plastic and poke at the screen



I love flipping with the buttons, and I like typing. But I would LOVE to be able to underline books with a stylus or my finger, or set a place to start a note. This alone would increase my Kindle usage tenfold.

evensteppinwolf


quality posts: 0 Private Messages evensteppinwolf

thanks to whomever posted the nook for sale at dailysteals.com

since i live in seattle, home of the mighty amazon (not the river), i would have had to pay an extra 10% sales tax if i bought the kindle. i just saved 10 bones (and to me, the kindle and the nook are equals).

peace, shane

Spiky


quality posts: 16 Private Messages Spiky
masshuum wrote:Apples and oranges my friend.

Many of us read quite a bit and a backlit screen causes too much eye-strain. The kindle completely avoids that. Sure, you need light but it's worth the trade off and BATTERY LIFE.


It's always curious to me that those of us who dislike light so much are the ones that want the backlit screen. (so we don't have to turn on any other lights) Ironic, really.

Tip for those with a backlight, invert the screen colors.

max40watt


quality posts: 7 Private Messages max40watt
csl312 wrote:Thanks for the quick responses about PDFs. I am in physics so it is a lot of charts/graphs. I dont like reading on LCD screens, so that is why I too many cookies to go the tablet route but thought an e-ink device could save some trees instead of printing out all the articles I read. I guess I will have to wait and hope the next gen has better PDF support.





I'm a molecular bio grad student and you really are going to want to stay away from devices like this as they mangle the figures.

You may not like lcd screens, but have you tried some of the 'higher end' ips lcd screens like on the Ipad? They often tend to be a bit easier on the eyes and the figures are of course well represented.

sliderlee


quality posts: 4 Private Messages sliderlee

I recently won a free Kindle (non-3G) from work. I am totally in love with it, especially for riding the train to work and for travel. I don't necessarily use it for all reading, but nothing beats it for travel. Not sure about the Kindle as compared to others (such as the Nook, which I might have bought, had I actually had to buy my first e-Reader). It is easy to read on, you can make use of the free wifi and the like during travel (download more books, and even surf the web, albeit not very well).


Just bought my parents a new one of the 3G Kindle.. Paid a LOT more than this for it.. Hope the fact that it is refurbished is not a big deal.

If you don't have an e-Reader yet or are looking for a new one, this is the deal for you. JUMP on it!

Judy2


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Judy2
shakemup wrote:Can anyone who has a kindle 3g check blogger.com and see how it works please?



Blogger.com seems to work ok. There is even a mobile section so one can easily post from the Kindle.

musikmom


quality posts: 0 Private Messages musikmom

The description says..."Charge Time: Fully charges in approximately 4 hours via the included U.S. power adapter. Also supports charging from your computer via the included USB 2.0 cable"...but then where it says what is included, it only mentions the usb cable. So which is it?

blueflamingo


quality posts: 2 Private Messages blueflamingo

I bought mine from a friend. Love it! This is an incredible deal.

selune13


quality posts: 3 Private Messages selune13
gammonb wrote:Had the e-ink reader, but gave it to my sister when the color Nook came out. Vastly better. Now I can read at night with the light off (I do use the night mode) and I can check out library books and am not tied just to Amazon for my purchases.



I purchased the Nook color the other night....and promptly returned it the next day. For a dedicated reader, that sucker is HEAVY!!! you can't really hold it in front of you for long periods of time. As for web browsing, yes, it has access to most web content, but it's terribly slow to load and graphics and, as a result, pretty much ignored my finger swipes while it was loading. Most times, I couldn't scroll or even tap on a button. In summary, for a dedicated reader, get a Kindle or other light reader; for web and reading, get a tablet. Skip the Nook color.

bradleync


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bradleync
masshuum wrote:Absolutely incorrect.

There's two places the ads show up. At the bottom of the home screen, which is where your books are, very unobtrusive. And as a screensaver, I.E when you're NOT actively reading.


Also, you basically get one set of four ads a week. Most of the time two are Amazon ones offering an MP3 album for a buck, any Roku player 50% off (great deal, btw), A $20 gift card for $10, etc.

The other recurring ads are olay, buick and visa.

VERY unobtrusive and you get some good deals to boot.

Personally, if it was between the Kindle with unobtrusive ads and some genuine deals occasionally versus this second gen kindle, I'd go with the new one. The screen is better and overall just a more polished experienced.

However, what makes this Woot a great deal is the free 3G, which if you'll actually need it then that's good, but it should be noted that if a book is too large that you'll have to download it over wi-fi anyway. Of course if you're only reading novels that's unlikely to be an issue for anyone. So, only get this if you NEED the 3G. Otherwise upgrade to the Kindle 3 and you won't be disappointed.


Still, since the Kindle with OFFERS is actually OFFERS, not just simple ads, it's well worth considering if you're on a tight budget.



I disagree about the third generation being more "polished". Take a look at the Kindle message boards for the past months, and you will find numerous complaints about the build quality of the third generation. I have this model, and have never had one problem with it!
It is constructed better, with a metal back, as opposed to all plastic. The new models are being broken faster than you can read a book, and especially the grey ones have a problem with the lettering on the keyboard and buttons wearing off. This is a great deal! Do not hesitate! It will sell out. Oh, and the difference in screen contrast is minimal at best. I have put mine next to a new one, and it is really hard to tell the difference.

evensteppinwolf


quality posts: 0 Private Messages evensteppinwolf


" I do my reading on the Kindle and I never ask myself why. "

do you find yourself asking why there's not some kind of a discount on ebooks vs. real books?

'cuz i do.

i don't mind paying the author the same premium for his/her work, but lets face it, there's a TON of money wrapped up in the manufacturing, shipping, distribution, warehousing and handling of a "real" book.

why isn't there some kind of saving passed on to the consumer in the case of virtual books?

Judy2


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Judy2
Judy2 wrote:Blogger.com seems to work ok. There is even a mobile section so one can easily post from the Kindle.



P.S. If you use the mobi directories and mobi search the web features via wifi or 3G work really well. Many sites like the BBC have pages designed for small screens. Google and Wiki work well. The NYT sucks. Reading email works pretty well, writing it, not so much unless a short response.

bradleync


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bradleync
evensteppinwolf wrote:thanks to whomever posted the nook for sale at dailysteals.com

since i live in seattle, home of the mighty amazon (not the river), i would have had to pay an extra 10% sales tax if i bought the kindle. i just saved 10 bones (and to me, the kindle and the nook are equals).

peace, shane



Enjoy it when Barnes and Nobles goes completely out of business! They are already on their way there.

myagi


quality posts: 2 Private Messages myagi

I have this model of Kindle and love it - I'd say it's a great deal at $90. The 3G whispernet service (which is intended for the purchase and syncing of books) does come with basic web access, which essentially means that you have free WAP browser access.

The one segment that I'd say the Kindle really gets is people that a) love to read, and b) travel or move a lot. It made a real big difference for me to have the Kindle version of various Lonely Planet editions instead of having to lug around the bulky paper tomes. The 3G access comes in really handy in a pinch when you're, say, stuck in NZ during an earthquake and the phones are down yet you want to shoot off an e-mail telling everyone you're okay.

sdc100


quality posts: 497 Private Messages sdc100
Watcher95 wrote:I don't understand this post.

What is the "obvious advantage"

How does a stylus feel more natural than a finger?

Have you noticed that stylusesess(plural of stylus) have pretty much dropped off the earth for all other forms of handheld devices?

Personally, I would rather brush my finger on the edge of the device to change the page(which is easily 99%+ of the interface actions people make with these devices) than have to pick up a piece of plastic and poke at the screen



Personally, I'd rather push a dedicated tactile button to change the page than to brush my fingers on the screen. It's much more efficient since there is less finger movement. I have my thumb over the page button of my Entourage as I hold it to read.

I can't speak for the original post, but having a stylus does indeed feel more natural in some apps. The Entourage gives me the opportunity to try both since the left side is stylus-activated e-Ink and the right side is a touchscreen tablet. Since we're taught to draw and write using pencils and pens, such apps feel much more natural using a stylus. I definitely have more precision with the stylus, especially when making drawn or written annotations on small text. And when handwriting recognition comes to most tablets, a stylus will be a must -- especially for non-Western languages. I edit academic 30-60 page papers on a Windows Tablet (with handwriting recognition) and there is no way it can be done without a stylus (or keyboard).

The major advantage of a stylus based system is the ability to use the tablet like a sheet of paper. When I write with a pen, my hands often rest on the paper just like most people. You can't do that with a resistive or capacitive touchscreen. That's why REAL full size tablets like the Fujitsu Win XP handwriting models use a stylus. It is is preferred by people who actually need to write, i.e. some of the doctors in my office use tablets to take patient notes.

johnplamb


quality posts: 0 Private Messages johnplamb
masshuum wrote:Absolutely incorrect.

There's two places the ads show up. At the bottom of the home screen, which is where your books are, very unobtrusive. And as a screensaver, I.E when you're NOT actively reading.


Also, you basically get one set of four ads a week. Most of the time two are Amazon ones offering an MP3 album for a buck, any Roku player 50% off (great deal, btw), A $20 gift card for $10, etc.

The other recurring ads are olay, buick and visa.

VERY unobtrusive and you get some good deals to boot.

Personally, if it was between the Kindle with unobtrusive ads and some genuine deals occasionally versus this second gen kindle, I'd go with the new one. The screen is better and overall just a more polished experienced.

However, what makes this Woot a great deal is the free 3G, which if you'll actually need it then that's good, but it should be noted that if a book is too large that you'll have to download it over wi-fi anyway. Of course if you're only reading novels that's unlikely to be an issue for anyone. So, only get this if you NEED the 3G. Otherwise upgrade to the Kindle 3 and you won't be disappointed.


Still, since the Kindle with OFFERS is actually OFFERS, not just simple ads, it's well worth considering if you're on a tight budget.



I don't believe that you would ever HAVE to download a book over wi-fi, no matter how large it is. In fact my kindle only has 3G and no wi-fi capability, and the size of books has never been an issue. The reason that 3G is great is that you can get a new book wherever and whenever you want one...in a car, on a train, or whatever, without having to look for a McDonalds or a Starbucks.

toddbeall


quality posts: 2 Private Messages toddbeall
bmrbill wrote:Looks like $189 new, good price here for a refurb...



But this is 2nd gen, so it is not comparable to the 3rd gen one for $189.

If this were 3rd gen, then it would be a super deal. As it is, not so great.

Funkthulhu


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Funkthulhu

Okay, I'm a reader, and a collector.

I've got a personal library of well over 500 volumes at this point. Aside from the obvious advantages/disadvantages (Color photos, larger format, wear & tear, moving a couple tonnes of books...) what I want to know about is the post hardware cost.

Where do I find cheap books? (ie, free) I get nearly all of my books from used bookstores, almost never buy new books when they come out, and have the patience to wait for a deal on a hard copy. (often from Amazon for a few bucks!) Plus, any book I buy goes on the shelf to be reread by me later, lent out to friends, and passed on to those who come after me. There just isn't the same impact if I hand my niece a thumb-drive instead of something she can hold.

Explain to me why most of the Ebooks I've seen on the Kindle-store cost more than a paperback? I'm open-minded, I know a portion of the cost of a new book goes to offsetting the cost of printing and paper before the publisher or the author gets a penny. But I sincerely doubt that dropping 10 bucks on an Ebook is getting the author or the publisher anywhere close to the same amount of money as a physical copy. Considering we're dealing with digital media, why aren't most of the books available just a couple bucks or just A Buck for older media? (or Free?)

I'm sorry this is mostly a rant, but I just haven't had anybody I know who has a Kindle (or a Nook) and has been able to "sell it".

So, sell me! What am I gaining by buying any Ebook reader, let alone this one? How much more money have you thrown down the digital hole never to see again? Or am I missing something blatantly obvious that will make me feel silly?

(And then, after clicking around enough, I found Amazon's links to free books. 2.5 Million?!? So, yeah, plenty to read there, but what about the rest of it?)

"Ph'nglui nglw'nafh Funkthulhu R'Lomaha wgah'nagl wootagn"*

*In his house in Omaha, Funkthulhu is Wooting. . .

KamikazeKen


quality posts: 17 Private Messages KamikazeKen
tvman wrote:I have a nook and I love it. Eink is not exclusive to kindle and the best thing about nook is the ability to use epub library books. Every Friday they give you a book for free too. Plus the Barnes & Noble prices on ebooks is great. They always have lots of sales etc.



kindle recently announced they will be supporting epub.

sdc100


quality posts: 497 Private Messages sdc100
selune13 wrote:I purchased the Nook color the other night....and promptly returned it the next day. For a dedicated reader, that sucker is HEAVY!!! you can't really hold it in front of you for long periods of time. As for web browsing, yes, it has access to most web content, but it's terribly slow to load and graphics and, as a result, pretty much ignored my finger swipes while it was loading. Most times, I couldn't scroll or even tap on a button. In summary, for a dedicated reader, get a Kindle or other light reader; for web and reading, get a tablet. Skip the Nook color.



It sounds like you didn't apply the latest updates to your Nook. There should also be improvements if you change the OS to Android 3.0.

For those of us who both read ebooks and need apps, and do web browsing, but don't want to carry multiple devices, the color Nook or another color tablet is fine. It's not much heavier than a hardback book, and certainly lighter than most textbooks.

marisano


quality posts: 2 Private Messages marisano
toastman91 wrote:The new ones are a bit smaller and have the eink pearl screens. How much better they are I honestly dont know



The 3rd gen. Kindles also support actual page numbers that correspond to a physically printed book (identified via ISBN number). This can be very useful when using a Kindle 3 in conjunction with a book club or in academia. Kindle DX and generations 1 & 2 only support "location numbers". It does not appear that Amazon will update their firmware to also support page numbers.

herrtodd


quality posts: 0 Private Messages herrtodd

For $20 more get yourself the add-supported third gen. The size is great, the free 3G web browser is handy in a pinch, and you get WiFi which then allows you to use Instapaper for free to save webpages for reading later.

I'm honestly surprised that woot's offering such a crappy deal -- especially when the product comes from the mothership.

LOGICALPSYCHO


quality posts: 5 Private Messages LOGICALPSYCHO
herrtodd wrote:For $20 more get yourself the add-supported third gen. The size is great, the free 3G web browser is handy in a pinch, and you get WiFi which then allows you to use Instapaper for free to save webpages for reading later.

I'm honestly surprised that woot's offering such a crappy deal -- especially when the product comes from the mothership.





Pretty sure the ad-supported kindle is not 3g.

jpscot3


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jpscot3

So I'm one of those people that always swore that I needed a physical book in my hands, the feel of paper, the smell of the pages, etc, etc... I gotta say, once you get about three pages in, you don't even realize that you're not looking at real pages.

What's even better for me is that you can change the size of the font. I read very quickly, so I make everything super-small fonted, and I don't have to turn pages as quickly. If you're old and blind-ish, you can make everything a large-print book.

Also, as a word of warning (I'm sure that all the other Kindle users will agree): People will constantly, and I mean CONSTANTLY, interrupt your reading to ask "Hey, is that one of those new eBook do-hickeys? How do you like it? How does it work? Does it have books on it?" Gets pretty annoying. I purchased a leather cover for mine that makes it look like a book, too, just so I could blend in with the masses.

eydaimon


quality posts: 0 Private Messages eydaimon
DocMphd wrote:Mostly size. Possibly a slightly sharper screen.



seriously? mostly size? Screen size is the same, but yes, device size is smaller for new gen.

"possibly" sharper screen?

Why try help someone and just feed them misinformation?

The screen is waaay better as far as contrast. Page turns are much faster. It's a new model with about a year of research put into it.

I owned both, and I would never spend $90 for the K2 when I could spend the extra $40 to get a K3. In fact, I'd rather get the ad-run K3 for $110 than the K2 adfree for $90.

In fact, this deal is so bad I'm going to stop monitoring woot again for deals.

sdc100


quality posts: 497 Private Messages sdc100
masshuum wrote:Apples and oranges my friend.

Many of us read quite a bit and a backlit screen causes too much eye-strain. The kindle completely avoids that. Sure, you need light but it's worth the trade off and BATTERY LIFE.

Comparing a tablet to a true e-reader (one that uses e-ink) is no comparison whatsoever because they're intended for two different things entirely.

I personally have both, a tablet and a kindle, and they share some of the same duties, but at the end of the day I do my reading on the Kindle and I never ask myself why.



You've basically discredited much of your post by claiming that only eInk devices are "true e-readers." Where, in the definition of eReaders, do you see that it must use eInk? Please give me a link. I've been reading eBooks for about a decade, both on a Sony Clie PDA and a Fujitsu full size Win XP tablet -- way before eInk was invented. We used formats like MOBI and just plain text (i,e. Project Guttenberg). In fact, several of my medical reference books were in my PDa, with glorious full color anatomical graphics and photos. Are you telling me that it wasn't "true" e-reading until eInk came out?

The bottom line is that personal preference and no one should be so arrogant as to say which technology makes for better e-reading. I too have both eInk and color LCD (the Entourage has both), as well as a full size Windows tablet. I have no real preference. For many non-fiction text, i.e. medical textbooks, and magazines, i.e. Scientific American, color is a must. Period.

I often use the eInk side only because it saves electricity and not because of eye fatigue. Here is a CNET article on the debate, with opinions from an opthalmologist. Indeed, experts say that eye fatigue is subjective. For many older readers who are used to paper, eInk might be preferable. But to the young generation, raised on computers and video games, LCD is not only fine but it's preferable. That's because their eyes and brain have grown accustomed to the high contrast of LCD (whose monitors are rated in contrast ratio) since infancy. For them, the poor contrast of e-Ink, which is less than that of most real paper, causes fatigue and attention deficit. One of the biggest challenges for today's teachers is to incorporate multimedia into the classroom because b/w text can't hold students' interest.

In other words, don't make sweeping generalizations about which technology is better -- or which is "real." It's a matter of preference, and frankly, until color eInk matures, color LCD is winning the marketplace, as judged by new devices.

jpscot3


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jpscot3

For the people who are looking at this as a possible text-book deal... I recently graduated with an English degree. I got tired of dropping $200-$300 a semester on paperback course materials, so I got one of these puppies... Most classic literature, you can get for free from Kindle's marketplace (which, with the 3G, can download within a minute. Handy. Especially when you forgot to download it before class, and you're about to get called on.) Or, if it's something that isn't on the free marketplace, hit up Project Gutenburg, plug your Kindle into your computer, and you can add it to your library that way. That goes for anything you can find on the internet in text form, or .pdf's, if your reader will allow you to copy and paste into a .txt format.

So for the cost of one semester's textbooks, you're into a new Kindle. (I've got the version Woot's selling now and I love it, but at that point, I'd be tempted to get the third edition + 3G.) Added bonus, when you're reading stuff for critical analysis, and you make underlines, it adds them to a "My Highlights" section. So you don't have to go hunting for a quote you found for a paper when you're writing at 3 a.m. and your paper's due in 5 hours. Also, if you have a large passage you need to quote and you don't want to type the whole thing out, you can plug it into your computer, go to the library, and copy and paste the section you need out of your highlights.

Ragnarok043


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Ragnarok043

seems like the general consensus is that if you want or need 3G then its a good deal, but it doesnt apply to me since i have 4G mobile hot spot on my phone. ive never held a kindle 2 but ive bought a kindle 3 as a gift before and i like the lightness, compact form factor and the D pad as oppose to the toggle stick. on the other hand the white kindle 2 looks so much better than the graphite kindle 3, but the darker borders are easier on the eyes. so would i be better off paying the additional $20 for the special offers kindle 3 instead.