mokco


quality posts: 1 Private Messages mokco

Bought two; one already has a horizontal crack the entire width of the panel. While the units still works - getting in touch with the company to address the issue under warranty has been impossible. The low current nature of these units are great to balance out a cold spot within my house and for use in maintaining temperature in my basement during the winter months. Don't consider these units as your primary heat source...@ 400 watts (think of 4 100 watt light bulbs) these are good for some supplemental heat.

tiga44


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tiga44

I used one of these in my old house. Used in the master bedroom - if you kept the door closed while this was on it would definitely take the chill out of the air. The problem I had was the wiring melted on the inside - luckily I was there when it happened. I put a replacement unit in and the same thing happened a few months later. That was it for me.

medscript


quality posts: 4 Private Messages medscript
bowlingb wrote:This is the correct formula for DC, but not for AC. There are additional factors for AC depending on whether it is single phase or three phase for instance. For single phase like most households in the US you have to apply a 0.8 power factor to the AC voltage to get the "equivalent" DC voltage for Ohm's law. This means using 88-96V for the calculation.



This reply and the original are the reason why I love the people on woot. Thank you good sir for sharing your knowledge!

Revert


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Revert
wickedgirl wrote:Anyone know what amperage they draw?



400W - 400/120VAC= 3.33A
This is assuming the consumption is 400W, and not output. (This is my assumption anyway.)

BlueFreakQ


quality posts: 0 Private Messages BlueFreakQ

I got one of these during their last sale here. When it finally arrived, it was broken in half! (Not separate pieces, just one break down the center, front and back.) Disturbingly, the box was pristine, not even a crease or a dent. This coupled with no response from the company causes me to warn you fine folks away from this product.

whyjack


quality posts: 0 Private Messages whyjack

We purchased a unit a couple of months ago... to put in my young sons room as we feared him messing with the older style radiant floor board heater.

REALLY REALLY BAD IDEA...

This unit has no thermostat and from what we could tell - there is no rhyme or reason to when it cycles up and down..

The pics show all this radiating heat from around the unit that would actually circulate around the room... well that doesn't happen unless you have a fan plugged in nearby to "assist" in air movement.

After having it plugged in one day - the face of the unit was about 200 degrees - and the wall behind it was also hot enough that we felt it unsafe in our 1900's farmhouse.

We ended up taking the unit off the wall - but due to a bad storm that struck our area - we turned it into a make shift space heater - installing to a plywood/metal stand and heating a space in our basement.... it became a running joke between my husband and I... man this thing puts off a lot of heat- as long as your no more than 3" away from it.

Save your money for a better solution.

bluemaple


quality posts: 66 Private Messages bluemaple

Woot would be boring without educations like this. Thanks all. Not that the difference between 3.5 and 4.2 amps in the real world of cheap made in Mexico circuit breakers, wire, and receptacles matters. But facts are facts.

@mm9135 made the most sense to me. The following page helped me understand it better:
http://www.bcae1.com/voltages.htm

wickedgirl wrote:Anyone know what amperage they draw?


bowlingb wrote:A = P / (V * Pf)
where Pf is a power factor for AC current and is 0.8 for single phase AC.
so 400W / (120V * 0.8) = 4.16A

So call it 4.2 Amps.


ciabelle wrote:So with 110-120VAC household current, we can use Ohms's law (watts/volts = amps) and come up with a result in the ballpark of 3.5 amps.


bowlingb wrote:This is the correct formula for DC, but not for AC. There are additional factors for AC depending on whether it is single phase or three phase for instance. For single phase like most households in the US you have to apply a 0.8 power factor to the AC voltage to get the "equivalent" DC voltage for Ohm's law. This means using 88-96V for the calculation.


mm9135 wrote:You are mixing up power factor with RMS. 120 volts is the RMS value of the USA line voltage. Actual peak voltage is 155. The RMS value (120) is the same as the DC potential and since it is resistive heat there is no power factor. 3.3 amps is more correct.

myfester


quality posts: 4 Private Messages myfester
lstaff wrote:Does anyone think this would be useful as a source of heat in a chicken coop?



I was thinking the same thing. But if it's not cool to the touch, then I'd skip on it. Don't want fried chickens.

anomious


quality posts: 0 Private Messages anomious

Only 400 watts...You have to be kidding. The majority of heaters are 1500 watts.

tedkaz


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tedkaz
bendandpeel wrote:That's a 22% discount. Besides, $12.95 is $12.95, enough for a nice lunch.



They are actually prime on Amazon, plus the one listed on Amazon are made in South Africa as opposed to these listed as made in China.

mabehr


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mabehr
jshagam wrote:Two questions:

1) Does it have a built-in shutoff timer?
2) Does it have a thermostat?

From all of the information I can find about it online, it looks like the answer to both questions is "no." So how does one control the temperature and, ideally, make it automatically shut off after a certain amount of time?



No shut off timer, no thermostat. It takes a few hours to warm up and cool down, so it stays on pretty much the whole day (though a standard security timer could turn it off at 8am and on again at 4pm). The argument is that it's so cheap to operate that you can easily afford to keep it on all the time.

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 545 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

tedkaz wrote:I have two of these already, but the ones I purchased say "Proudly Made in South Africa" on them, I see the info on these says Made in China. Can anyone verify where these where made? Would like another pair but I want to get exactly what I already have.

http://www.amazon.com/Econo-Heat-0603-E-Heater-White/dp/B005DKN20W#productDetails


I recall this discussion from previous sales. The first ones were made in South Africa, I believe. They've since moved production to China.



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gordonmeyer


quality posts: 2 Private Messages gordonmeyer

I've been running a pair of these for more than six years and I'm happy with them. I wrote up my experiences with them, and there is a long comment thread from others, here:

http://www.gordonmeyer.com/2006/10/convection_wall/comments/page/3/

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 545 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

bendandpeel wrote:That's a 22% discount. Besides, $12.95 is $12.95, enough for a nice lunch.


Or movie ticket! (Two movie tickets at my Cinemark theater.)



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bruce57


quality posts: 9 Private Messages bruce57
bendandpeel wrote:That's a 22% discount. Besides, $12.95 is $12.95, enough for a nice lunch.



Don't know where you learned your math skills, but you should refer to pcwolf's earlier post.

mabehr


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mabehr
whyjack wrote:We purchased a unit a couple of months ago... to put in my young sons room as we feared him messing with the older style radiant floor board heater.

REALLY REALLY BAD IDEA...

This unit has no thermostat and from what we could tell - there is no rhyme or reason to when it cycles up and down..

The pics show all this radiating heat from around the unit that would actually circulate around the room... well that doesn't happen unless you have a fan plugged in nearby to "assist" in air movement.

After having it plugged in one day - the face of the unit was about 200 degrees - and the wall behind it was also hot enough that we felt it unsafe in our 1900's farmhouse.

We ended up taking the unit off the wall - but due to a bad storm that struck our area - we turned it into a make shift space heater - installing to a plywood/metal stand and heating a space in our basement.... it became a running joke between my husband and I... man this thing puts off a lot of heat- as long as your no more than 3" away from it.

Save your money for a better solution.



It actually is pretty clever in that it actually creates its own air flow without the need of a fan. The backside is more porous than the front, meaning that the two inches between it and the wall get hotter than in front. This causes the air there to heat up pretty quickly, sending it zooming up. It then sucks cold air off the bottom of the floor. It's designed to heat the room, not the space in front of the unit. My gut feel is that it requires a pretty sealed room: I bet that if you had an air leak in the ceiling (not unlikely in a century old house), I think the hot air would just go straight out!

Installing it backwards actually turns it into a nice space heater though

bluemaple


quality posts: 66 Private Messages bluemaple
tedkaz wrote:They are actually prime on Amazon, plus the one listed on Amazon are made in South Africa as opposed to these listed as made in China.


@tedkaz, so they print (origin), but Amazon is notorious for inaccurate product details and/or obsolete product data that does not reflect the currently sold item.

badhabit12


quality posts: 14 Private Messages badhabit12
acanarelli wrote:I'm considering purchasing a few of these units for my home but need to have a few questions answered by some of you nice people who already own and use them. First of all, I have gas fired, hot water base board heat and wonder it this presents any problem with the possibility of using these units?

Next, should the heating units be fastened to an outside wall or an inside wall? In other words, is it best fastened to an outside wall where baseboard heating elements are already installed or to an inside wall between rooms?

Finally, will ceiling paddle fans assist or hinder the proper operation of these heating units? Thanks in advance for your help!




You need to increase your basic knowledge of how this and related products work before you can ask intelligent questions. I suggest going to GOOGLE and putting in something like:

HOW DOES THE "Econo-Heat" and similar heating SYSTEMS WORK?

Lots of pictures, diagrams and videos.

miahmouse


quality posts: 0 Private Messages miahmouse

Not that great with any sizeable room. After running for 8hrs it failed to raise the temp by even 1 degree in a 10x13 room...

bluemaple


quality posts: 66 Private Messages bluemaple

Or we could simply answer @acanarelli's questions:
1) No.
2) Depends on how well insulated your outside wall is since these radiate using the wall as a backer. Generally, baseboard or freestanding radiators are located along outside walls and near windows since that is the coldest place in a room. If you have good insulation, put it on the outside wall, but poor insulation, consider putting it on the inside wall with the benefit of radiating some heat into the next room.
3) Ceiling fans when reversed to blow up can distribute heat. But try it in your rooms to see if it makes a noticeable difference.

Keep in mind these are not Primary heat sources for winter climates.

They are intended as supplemental heaters in cooler rooms or to take the edge off cold in moderate climates.

acanarelli wrote:I'm considering purchasing a few of these units for my home but need to have a few questions answered by some of you nice people who already own and use them. First of all, I have gas fired, hot water base board heat and wonder it this presents any problem with the possibility of using these units?

Next, should the heating units be fastened to an outside wall or an inside wall? In other words, is it best fastened to an outside wall where baseboard heating elements are already installed or to an inside wall between rooms?

Finally, will ceiling paddle fans assist or hinder the proper operation of these heating units? Thanks in advance for your help!


badhabit12 wrote:You need to increase your basic knowledge of how this and related products work before you can ask intelligent questions. I suggest going to GOOGLE and putting in something like:

HOW DOES THE "Econo-Heat" and similar heating SYSTEMS WORK?

Lots of pictures, diagrams and videos.



Nikk


quality posts: 2 Private Messages Nikk

How would this work with heating a 2 car garage? Would this be powerful enough? Doesn't have to be extremely warm, more just checking to see if it would make it bearable to hang out in the garage on cold nights.

lonnie247


quality posts: 0 Private Messages lonnie247
wootaddict wrote:...this unit costs $76.98 on Amazon. A whole $12.95 (after tax) in savings--big whoop!



Yeah, Woot has just become Amazon light, without the Prime.

bluemaple


quality posts: 66 Private Messages bluemaple
wootaddict wrote:...this unit costs $76.98 on Amazon. A whole $12.95 (after tax) in savings--big whoop!
TCayer wrote:So go spend an extra $13 dumbass!


Or, @wootaddict, buy it on Woot and Paypal me the $12.95 - I've been eyeballing one of those fancy snow brushes over in Woot Tools & Garden for our cars.

RedMenace


quality posts: 1 Private Messages RedMenace

I bought this last time Woot had them for this price. Money well spent, it works well in a smaller room (10x10 is suggested max room size).

TIP: Make sure you do not try to force it to mount too tightly or it could crack due to expansion/contraction when it heats and cools off.

TCayer


quality posts: 9 Private Messages TCayer
awschroader wrote:Thats easy, put it on an interior wall. That way any heat that 'leaks' through the wall will help heat another room rather thn waste it.



The rely above was in response to use in a chicken coop. I doubt it has interior walls...

TCayer


quality posts: 9 Private Messages TCayer

"Efficiently warms a room of 120 square feet." That's not that great. Woot had the infra-red space heaters for around this same price. They heat 1500 square feet (at 1500 watts) and do it well. Plus they don't get hot to the touch, have temperature control and auto shut off. Except for the extra wattage, they address all the concerns listed here...

willnott


quality posts: 0 Private Messages willnott
bowlingb wrote:A = P / (V * Pf)
where Pf is a power factor for AC current and is 0.8 for single phase AC.
so 400W / (120V * 0.8) = 4.16A

So call it 4.2 Amps.



Hee Hee - the specs themselves say 3.3 A - so pf must be 1.0.... (no effective imaginary component to the heating element).

willnott


quality posts: 0 Private Messages willnott
TCayer wrote:"Efficiently warms a room of 120 square feet." That's not that great. Woot had the infra-red space heaters for around this same price. They heat 1500 square feet (at 1500 watts) and do it well. Plus they don't get hot to the touch, have temperature control and auto shut off. Except for the extra wattage, they address all the concerns listed here...



Not only that, but heat RISES naturally, and so will stratify at the ceiling, unless there is some source of air movement in the room. The concept of heat rising, & then "moving back down" to warm the room is incorrect.

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 545 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

Hey all, we saw a couple of you noting that you had trouble getting hold of the company for warranty assistance.

We just talked to them and here is how to contact them:


Phone: 888-252-5744 and simply follow the prompts.
Note that you won't always get a live person but leave a message.

Email via their site: http://econo-heat.com/us/contact-us/


The company has said they they are caught up on all calls and emails.

Hope that helps.



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yossisiegel


quality posts: 4 Private Messages yossisiegel

I have used both and determined that by using a $30 oil filled radiator, it works out to be a much lower cost option.

Most oil radiators have three settings, low, medium and high, along with a thermostat. The low setting runs at 750 watts. With the thermostat at 3 (out of 1-6), it keeps a 12x12 bedroom at a toasty 72 degrees, when it is in the 20's outside. Best of all, it "clicks" on for around 30 minutes per hour. So I am actually using less wattage than this item. Plus, I have the portability of a unit on wheels, I can place it in middle of the room for better heat disbursement, the control of a thermostat. And finally, it's only $30

jayducharme


quality posts: 2 Private Messages jayducharme
gordonmeyer wrote:I've been running a pair of these for more than six years and I'm happy with them.



Hi Gordon! I too have been running these for about six years -- the difference is that my entire home heats with these. Each room has one; bigger rooms (over 200 sq. ft.) have two. They've been running great. I also have a wood stove in our basement, so when the temperature drops into sub-freezing, I fire that up. Overall, our home stays at a comfortable 64-68 degrees, and the increase in our electric bill is far less than what we used to pay for oil heat.

I have the panels zoned with separate thermostats that trigger them only when needed.

One caution: make sure when you attach them to the wall, you give them a little "wiggle room." They slightly expand and contract, and if you tighten them too much, the panel will split.

drewd


quality posts: 4 Private Messages drewd
bowlingb wrote:A = P / (V * Pf)
where Pf is a power factor for AC current and is 0.8 for single phase AC.
so 400W / (120V * 0.8) = 4.16A

So call it 4.2 Amps.



I suspect that this is a resistive load, so the current and voltage will be in phase with each other, thus no power factor correction is necessary.

And not to be (more) critical, you can't just pick any old value for the power factor.

grr


quality posts: 0 Private Messages grr

Is this heater UL approved?

bigbreeze


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bigbreeze

These are remarkably similar to Avitec bird cage heaters, it seems. I've had one of those for the bird for a few years with no issues, and the bird likes being warm. These are a larger size but same principle.


catgrrl wrote:Econo-Heater Brain Dump

I have these in two of my bedrooms. Background: 50-year-old house, not that well insulated. Southwest Washington--we have winter here, but not like Minnesota.

My main heaters are huge, ancient electric baseboards, and they always roast me out of my bedroom. To run one of these panels 24/7 here cost me about $25/month. So when it's cold, I just keep this thing going in my bedroom most of the time, and it does a decent job of making the room comfortable. If we get an unusually cold spell I might turn on the baseboard, but ordinarily this panel does a good job. If you have huge rooms, you might need more than one of these.

My panels just have an on/off switch on the cord; I haven't bothered to figure out the thermostat thing. Depending on the weather, I'll shut it off for a few hours if it gets too warm.

The panel gets warm to the touch, but it won't burn you unless maybe you pass out drunk leaning up against it with no shirt on. All bets are off then.

I should mention that both my panels have cracks running through them. They still work fine, but anybody with a lick of sense would probably replace them. I suspect that this issue may be resolved with the newer panels, but I can't say for sure. I bought two more last time I saw them on Woot, but I haven't gotten around to replacing them yet.

Fun Fact: You can paint these w/acrylic house paint to match your walls, or expertly forge a Picasso masterpiece to impress your friends.



drluv


quality posts: 0 Private Messages drluv
wickedgirl wrote:Anyone know what amperage they draw?



Simple formula: Watts/volts = Amps

stique


quality posts: 0 Private Messages stique

Would this need to be plugged into a grounded outlet?

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 545 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

grr wrote:Is this heater UL approved?


From the specs:

UL Listed: Yes



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beloman


quality posts: 1 Private Messages beloman

Bought one of these on Amazon....a thermometer about 18" above the heater mounted on the wall reads 95-110 degrees F most of the time.
It heats well- not something you want to lean against or hold your hand to for more than a few seconds but certainly not likely to light anything up. It is used in an unheated entry way in my house and takes the edge off winter...your results will vary but my 8 x 10 space stays about the same temp as the rest of the house- taking the chill out of the air.

mm9135


quality posts: 1 Private Messages mm9135
drewd wrote:I suspect that this is a resistive load, so the current and voltage will be in phase with each other, thus no power factor correction is necessary.

And not to be (more) critical, you can't just pick any old value for the power factor.


You are correct drewd. Power factor is not a constant but rather a function of inductance, capacitance and frequency in an AC circuit.

btrob


quality posts: 0 Private Messages btrob
jshagam wrote:Two questions:

1) Does it have a built-in shutoff timer?
2) Does it have a thermostat?

From all of the information I can find about it online, it looks like the answer to both questions is "no." So how does one control the temperature and, ideally, make it automatically shut off after a certain amount of time?



Correct on both questions. We use a LUX programable thermostat that plugs into the wall to control our panel. You could also use a light timer just for timed operation.