gak0090


quality posts: 78 Private Messages gak0090
ifonlyunu wrote:I understand that the CMR is 200/240; However what is the Hz rate?



The real refresh rate is 120Hz

This page best explains it http://www.rtings.com/info/what-is-the-refresh-rate

skip down to this part:
What is Samsung Clear Motion Rate?
The Clear Motion Rate (CMR) is a made-up number invented by Samsung to qualify how a TV can reduce the appearance of motion blur. The refresh rate alone is not a perfect representation of the motion blur, so they added on top of it the backlight and processor speed.


Samsung's Clear Motion Rate (CMR) into the real panel ...... The 200/240 difference is due to the electrical system used by the country (50Hz vs 60Hz).

yorrick


quality posts: 0 Private Messages yorrick

I have three 3D TVs, all Vizio brand. Two are 32" like this one. I'll share some of my observations which may be dated or just plain wrong.

I don't think 3D is just a gimmick. I think the current 3D movie fad may pass, but I think the 3D sports will soon take off. Regardless, as others have mentioned, the 3D option is going to be put on the best TVs for that brand's series, a fact which is pretty obvious when you compare options within each brand. That is the main reason we went with 3D and we have been happy with them all.

A lot of the specs being thrown around with TVs do not mean very much as there are often no standards by which they are measured. The frequency is one of these. 60 Hz is pretty much the threshold of what the human eye can determine, and even then it can not pick up much detail, only a flicker pattern if one exists. Most modern TVs do some type of interpolation for standard resolution, and it is the artifacts your eye may pick up at 60 Hz. 120Hz is more than enough to hide any artifacts. One of my TVs is 480 Hz and the other two are 60 Hz and I see no difference. The 480 Hz is actually 240 Hz for each phase of the 3D signal, so I suspect this TV is truely 120 Hz per phase, which is why they use the "Clear Motion Rate". Still quite sufficient.

This is not shown to be a "Smart" TV, but you are probably going to need to get a 3D BluRay player to go with this anyway, and they should have all the same apps you would get on a Smart TV.

I have been looking for another similar to this, so I am in for one. All the Samsungs I have seen in the stores seem to have a good picture and style.

sledneckrdnk


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sledneckrdnk
geo8rge wrote:Does anyone who owns a 3D tv regularly use that feature? Just wondering? I rarely watch TV at all these days, so putting on glasses seems like a burden. On the other hand I can see 3D being big with children.



I have a 3D TV and I LOVE it. You must get a Sony or a Samsung though. Only they use true active 3D which is the best quality. As for wearing glasses its no different then being outside and wearing sunglasses all day!

ashli143


quality posts: 4 Private Messages ashli143
yorrick wrote:I have three 3D TVs, all Vizio brand. Two are 32" like this one. I'll share some of my observations which may be dated or just plain wrong.

I don't think 3D is just a gimmick. I think the current 3D movie fad may pass, but I think the 3D sports will soon take off. Regardless, as others have mentioned, the 3D option is going to be put on the best TVs for that brand's series, a fact which is pretty obvious when you compare options within each brand. That is the main reason we went with 3D and we have been happy with them all.

A lot of the specs being thrown around with TVs do not mean very much as there are often no standards by which they are measured. The frequency is one of these. 60 Hz is pretty much the threshold of what the human eye can determine, and even then it can not pick up much detail, only a flicker pattern if one exists. Most modern TVs do some type of interpolation for standard resolution, and it is the artifacts your eye may pick up at 60 Hz. 120Hz is more than enough to hide any artifacts. One of my TVs is 480 Hz and the other two are 60 Hz and I see no difference. The 480 Hz is actually 240 Hz for each phase of the 3D signal, so I suspect this TV is truely 120 Hz per phase, which is why they use the "Clear Motion Rate". Still quite sufficient.

This is not shown to be a "Smart" TV, but you are probably going to need to get a 3D BluRay player to go with this anyway, and they should have all the same apps you would get on a Smart TV.

I have been looking for another similar to this, so I am in for one. All the Samsungs I have seen in the stores seem to have a good picture and style.



Aren't most Vizio's passive 3d? I prefer passive and while I was shopping around I mainly looked for LG and Vizio because they seemed to be the only ones that appreciate passive.

johnkwoot


quality posts: 0 Private Messages johnkwoot
geo8rge wrote:Does anyone who owns a 3D tv regularly use that feature? Just wondering? I rarely watch TV at all these days, so putting on glasses seems like a burden. On the other hand I can see 3D being big with children.



The glasses aren't a problem because there is so little 3D content available. 3D television programming is almost zero, Netflix doesn't rent 3D movies, and physical video stores -- do they still exist?

About the only time you'll get to enjoy a 3D movie is when you buy one. At that point, watching 3D becomes a special treat and putting on the glasses is part of the attraction.

In the long run, you'll have so few 3D occasions (depending on how often you buy) that wearing the glasses won't be such a nuisance.

gsmit114


quality posts: 0 Private Messages gsmit114
ThunderThighs wrote:Hey all. Was just chatting with a co-worker and learned something new about 3D TVs that I didn't know.

He said that 3DTVs have a better and brighter picture when compared to their non 3D counterparts. Because of this, they're considered well suited to brighter rooms and rooms with glare.



The reason I think the TVs need the extra picture brightness boost is the glasses dim what you see, and it can be quite noticeable:

"LC shutter glasses are shutting out light half of the time; moreover, they are slightly dark even when letting light through, because they are polarized. This gives an effect similar to watching TV with sunglasses on, which causes a darker picture to be perceived by the viewer. However, this effect can produce a higher perceived display contrast when paired with LCD displays because of the reduction in backlight bleed. Since the glasses also darken the background, contrast is enhanced when using a brighter image."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Active_shutter_3D_system

I love my ~600hz 2k10 Panny 3D plasma, but only really use the glasses for select sport events (verizon has espn 3D which somewhat loops the same 30-50 shows for months with occasional new broadcasts), for movies like avatar which still looks great, and a number of ps3 games: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_3D_PlayStation_3_games.

I am still a 3D proponent, but to each his/her own.

claynpotter


quality posts: 6 Private Messages claynpotter

I have old 720p Plasma 50 inch that's not SmartTV. I purchase LG wifi media player (which is 4x2x4 box) and coasted me onlyu $25 at local computer store.

It can play web provide movie, such as Netflex, youtube, etc., and can stream from DNLA enabled networkstorage device. Or if you have portable HD or usb thumbdrive, you can play it as well.

works with 3D contents.

Not bad for $25 to upgrade old TV as an SmartTV.

I bought extra so I can hook it up on my Computer monitor. I can watch movies or play mp3 without turning on the computer.




maldito wrote:No. This is not a "Smart" TV.

Also, no, it doesn't have a VGA input.However, with video cards being so cheap nowadays, it easy to get one that has HDMI output.



gsmit114


quality posts: 0 Private Messages gsmit114
claynpotter wrote:I can watch movies or play mp3 without turning on the computer.



I wish my computer worked without turning it on :/) I know what you mean though, it's always a hassle grabbing my wireless keyboard+mouse to do stuff on my HTPC. Interfaces! Interfaces! My Kingdom for better Interfaces!

xxtermin8rxxx


quality posts: 3 Private Messages xxtermin8rxxx
casey00001 wrote:If you don't care about 3D gimmick this TV is 10 dollars cheaper, two year warranty and ability to return.

http://www.costco.com/Samsung-32%22-Class-1080p-LED-HDTV-UN32EH5000F.product.11759662.html



The refresh rate is only 60Hz... better to find a TV w/ TruMotion (or similar-named) tech + 120Hz or more on an LED/LED-LCD TV.

Don't bother w/ plasmas as there is an increased chance w/ ghosting.

nanaejt


quality posts: 3 Private Messages nanaejt
yorrick wrote:I have three 3D TVs, all Vizio brand. Two are 32" like this one. I'll share some of my observations which may be dated or just plain wrong.

I don't think 3D is just a gimmick. I think the current 3D movie fad may pass, but I think the 3D sports will soon take off. Regardless, as others have mentioned, the 3D option is going to be put on the best TVs for that brand's series, a fact which is pretty obvious when you compare options within each brand. That is the main reason we went with 3D and we have been happy with them all.

A lot of the specs being thrown around with TVs do not mean very much as there are often no standards by which they are measured. The frequency is one of these. 60 Hz is pretty much the threshold of what the human eye can determine, and even then it can not pick up much detail, only a flicker pattern if one exists. Most modern TVs do some type of interpolation for standard resolution, and it is the artifacts your eye may pick up at 60 Hz. 120Hz is more than enough to hide any artifacts. One of my TVs is 480 Hz and the other two are 60 Hz and I see no difference. The 480 Hz is actually 240 Hz for each phase of the 3D signal, so I suspect this TV is truely 120 Hz per phase, which is why they use the "Clear Motion Rate". Still quite sufficient.

This is not shown to be a "Smart" TV, but you are probably going to need to get a 3D BluRay player to go with this anyway, and they should have all the same apps you would get on a Smart TV.

I have been looking for another similar to this, so I am in for one. All the Samsungs I have seen in the stores seem to have a good picture and style.



Very good information

claynpotter


quality posts: 6 Private Messages claynpotter

Watching over the air TV broadcasting is all 2d, so when I watch TV, I don't use 3D.

I only put on 3D glasses when I watch 3D movies and wearing a pair of glasses is no issue for me. I just like 3D movies better than 2D, and tries to find 3D bluray version of movies when there is one.

I also watch my movies in 3d on a big screen (3000 ansi lumen projector that I got from tech.woot). Also play Grand Turismo in 3D on 100 inch screen with Logitech G27 and customized cockpit makes awesome driving simulation - my wife won't let me buy manual transmission two seater. Instead I have to drive a mini van..... And this is only way I can get around.... sigh....
Now, if I can only also use G27 for xbox360 Forza, too.....



geo8rge wrote:Does anyone who owns a 3D tv regularly use that feature? Just wondering? I rarely watch TV at all these days, so putting on glasses seems like a burden. On the other hand I can see 3D being big with children.



gsmit114


quality posts: 0 Private Messages gsmit114
claynpotter wrote:Watching over the air TV broadcasting is all 2d, so when I watch TV, I don't use 3D.



My tv actually has a 2D-3D convert mode (Panasonic P50GT50), that actually allows you to watch anything in 3D, with varying levels of success, but watching the simpsons in 3D can be a little offputting, maybe I need to watch the "Homer 3D" episode in 3D. =P

It does a decent conversion for shots with perceivable depth, like in a sports arena/stadium, where it can break the image up into layers and display some parts as being closer, but the true 3D rendered content still comes out the best.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
wouwolve wrote:A TV on Woot?? I'm shocked!



If you get shocked by the TV, you should get it examined by a qualified tecnician. Or call Samsung or Woot to get it exchanged. Electricity is nothing to fool around with ... unless you're into cattle prods and all that sicko stuff.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
lichme wrote:Don't be shocked that its a TV. Be shocked that its a NEW tv. I love my samsung, nothing but good experiences with it.



Exactly. Not only is it new, but it's a top name brand -- and the model doesn't appear to have been discontinuned. Woot has had 3D TVs in the past but they were from questionable off brands.

zeta30


quality posts: 1 Private Messages zeta30
JRN9999 wrote:only two HDMI ports? No thank you. You really need three. One for your cable box, one for blu-ray/DVD player and one for your computer or XBox/PS 3. Even cheap Seiki TVs from Sears & Kmart have 3 HDMI ports. I'll pass on this one.



No you don't, you only need one HDMI to go to your Home Theater receiver, (which mine has 8). Then plug all your devices in to your receiver.

editorkid


quality posts: 92 Private Messages editorkid
geo8rge wrote:Does anyone who owns a 3D tv regularly use that feature? Just wondering? I rarely watch TV at all these days, so putting on glasses seems like a burden. On the other hand I can see 3D being big with children.


I watch 3D stuff sporadically. I actually have a Tivo wish list for 3D so I can see what's on. Unfortunately, most of it is for kids.

I've been wearing glasses since I was 6 so it isn't much of a burden.

editorkid


quality posts: 92 Private Messages editorkid
gak0090 wrote:Kind of confused by this offering. If you are going to buy a 3D TV (which personally I still think is gimmicky) would this not be more suited for like a home theater type environment in your house? Who would use a 32" TV for a home theater when the price of a 60" TV's start at like $800? If you just needed a 32" TV in like a living room or bedroom you don't need 3D and the clear motion rate thing at 240hz is really not going to give you that much advantage on a 32" screen.


House? I live in an apartment. A 32" TV barely fits into the space I have in my living room. And frankly I don't think there are enough good movies to justify giving more space to home theater even if I had the space...

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
luke975 wrote:ehh. 3d is a gimmick that will pass. $380 is a stretch for a 32 in my opinion.



It's not expensive when you consider that:

1) Samsung is TOP name brand
2) It has a very high refresh rate that results in a very smooth picture when it's not used for 3D. This matters for sports and video games. Many cheaper NAME BRAND HDTVs only use 60hz or 120hz.
3) It has Internet features, i.e. a web browser, YouTube, etc and you can add apps. [UPDATE: I MAY BE WRONG ABOUT THIS. SEE MY UPDATED POST, THE ONE WITH THE EMBEDDED VIDEO]
4) It has a media player built-in to play virtually every format (except RealVideo's RM/RMVB, which is ironic since Samsung is Korean and that format is big in Asia)
5) It's media hub that can play media off any computer hooked into your network
6) It's 1080p when many 32" HDTVs are only 720p
7) It's LED backlit when many cheaper 32" NAME BRAND HDTVs still use fluorescent tubes (most are d/c models being sold at discounted prices)

So even if you don't plan on using 3D, this seems like a good value at $379.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
luke975 wrote:ehh. 3d is a gimmick that will pass. $380 is a stretch for a 32 in my opinion.



FYI ... when talkies, widescreen, stereo sound, Dolby 5.1 and color TV were invented, many detractors also called them "gimmicks." In fact, television itself was considered a passing fad when it was invented. The major difference, of course, is that 3D TV requires the wearing of glasses, which is annoying. And that's unlikely to change in the next few decades. Parallax filters, like those used in 3D handheld games and 1970's 3D postcards, only work when your eyes are inches aways from the screen. Still, 3D is the only major improvement in the evolution of TV that I can see. Sound is already excellent and 1080p should should satisfy our eyes for another decade or more (unless TVs get much much larger which is unlikely unless our living rooms also grow).

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
starmanbackwards wrote:Dont get their blu ray!!! youll be sorry like i am.



I'm very happy with their Samsung 3D Blu-ray player I got from Woot. It all depends on your expectations. If you bought it for the apps, then you may be disappointed, Still the fact, that Samsung released firmware updates as recently as a few months ago means that they're actively improving it.

That said, as a MEDIA PLAYER, it's is TOP RATE -- and that's the reason I bought it. Not only does it play my media files very smoothly, including 1080p MKVs, but it's fantastic as a DVD and Blu-Ray player. A major complaint of Blu-Ray players is how long it takes to load the disc. The Samsung loads all my DVDs and Bly-Rays within seconds. And plays them without any problems.

In other words, consider why you bought the Blu-Ray player. Was it to play Blu-Rays -- or did you want it to be an Internet portal, mini-PC and gaming machine? if the latter, then yeah, look elsewhere.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
nappyho wrote:NO pc input



True, but you can easily get a $5 DVI-to-HDMI connector since the signals are electrically the same. In fact, I've seen connectors for as little as 99 cents on eBay. Pages 9-10 of the manual tells you how to connect a PC (use HDMI1, not HDMI2).

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
deeluxx wrote:"Enjoy a greater level of home entertainment realism than ever before. Thanks to a resolution twice as high as standard HDTVs..."

??? standard HDTV's are 1080p, this is 1080p. To be 'twice the resolution' it'd basically have to be a 4K tv, which it isn't, because no one makes them.



No, 1080p is not standard for 32" HDTVs. There are two reasons why 720p TVs are still made in that size.

1) Many experts say that you can't tell the difference between 720 and 1080 on such a small screen at a reasonable viewing distance. Since the resolution difference isn't discernible, many viewers may actually prefer the smoother progressive picture of 720p to interlaced 1080i.

2) 1080p is NOT used by any US broadcaster at this point. HD stations either broadcast in 1080i (i.e. CBS, NBC) or 720p (ABC). 1080p is only used by Blu-Ray players and video games.

So given that 720p screens are cheaper to make, it's still a standard among 32" HDTVs.

kirdape


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kirdape
casey00001 wrote:Majority of PC's already in the home do not have HDMI out so people care.



They can buy an adapter

gsmit114


quality posts: 0 Private Messages gsmit114
luke975 wrote:ehh. 3d is a gimmick that will pass. $380 is a stretch for a 32 in my opinion.



The previous poster stuff, but more importantly to me you also get 2 sets of glasses with the TV for $380. A few months ago I got a generic pair on ebay from some chinese seller that sent them to me in what looked like biohazard tape around two cookie trays for $21. My original pair I got in '11 with a 10% discount from panasonic for $145. You are getting two for free worth $36, so the tv is costing you less than $350. Most 3D TVs aren't sold with glasses. http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-SSG-4100GB-Active-Glasses-Models/dp/B007K9P7H0/ref=sr_1_3?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1362691666&sr=1-3&keywords=glasses+3d

raeglatem


quality posts: 0 Private Messages raeglatem
deeluxx wrote:"Enjoy a greater level of home entertainment realism than ever before. Thanks to a resolution twice as high as standard HDTVs..."

??? standard HDTV's are 1080p, this is 1080p. To be 'twice the resolution' it'd basically have to be a 4K tv, which it isn't, because no one makes them.



It's under the impression that standard TV's are actually running at 720p or 1080i and therefore technically half the resolution. =D

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
mikeeyram wrote:As a gamer, what's the response time?
As someone who like movies, what's the Contrast ratio?
VESA mount?

I don't know about other buyers, but I never buy a TV/monitor without that information...



Response time and contrast ratios are very subjective and measurement varies from company to company. And frankly, most humans probably can't tell the difference between 5ms and 6ms, and 1,000,000-to-1 and 3,000,000-to-1 [dynamic] contrast ratio. The only objective number in your request is the VESA measurements, and that's only important to people who want to mount the TV on a wall (or replace the stand).

According to p15 of the User Maual, the VESA measurements are 20x20. I don't know if the units are cm or inches. It uses 4 M6 screws.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
editorkid wrote:House? I live in an apartment. A 32" TV barely fits into the space I have in my living room. And frankly I don't think there are enough good movies to justify giving more space to home theater even if I had the space...



Agreed. Many experts say that 32" is fine if you sit around 5'-6' away. That's sounds about right for many NYC apartments.

raddeo


quality posts: 0 Private Messages raddeo

anyone notice in the specs that it does not appear to have an ATSC tuner? this TV appears to be meant for the Japan/S.America market...ISDB-T standard.

yorrick


quality posts: 0 Private Messages yorrick
ashli143 wrote:Aren't most Vizio's passive 3d? I prefer passive and while I was shopping around I mainly looked for LG and Vizio because they seemed to be the only ones that appreciate passive.



I think most of the newer Vizio's are passive. The 32" I have are Model E3D320VX which are passive. These are great TVs but they are harder to find at their original prices and have gone up in price. I do not think Vizio makes anything similar anymore. My 42" Vizio uses active glasses.

To answer the question of how often the 3D is used, I would say 5%. As streaming options become more available, this may go up. The nice thing about buying 3D movies is that they usually come with 3 or 4 discs: 3D BD, 2D BD, DVD and Digital copy. The kitchen TV has never been used for 3D and it is often the most used in our house. If you have been looking, there is a big glut in the market for 1080p in the 26" to 40" range. Most decent TVs in this range will have both 1080p and 3D options and will be closer to the retail price of this one. Anything comparable to this TV at this price will likely have tube lighting and only 60Hz.

russwjohns


quality posts: 16 Private Messages russwjohns
claynpotter wrote:I have old 720p Plasma 50 inch that's not SmartTV. I purchase LG wifi media player (which is 4x2x4 box) and coasted me onlyu $25 at local computer store.

It can play web provide movie, such as Netflex, youtube, etc., and can stream from DNLA enabled networkstorage device. Or if you have portable HD or usb thumbdrive, you can play it as well.

works with 3D contents.

Not bad for $25 to upgrade old TV as an SmartTV.

I bought extra so I can hook it up on my Computer monitor. I can watch movies or play mp3 without turning on the computer.



Would that be the LG Network Media Player, model SP520? Usually priced at double what your paid, so you likely got a sale price. Does it connect via HDMI?

mudman2007


quality posts: 2 Private Messages mudman2007
ThunderThighs wrote:Howdy folks. This is another new Samsung from the Latin American market. You'll have to be creative on your Interweb hunts.

I know you can do it.



The proper term is "grey market"
which means zero warranty.

domurat


quality posts: 2 Private Messages domurat

If that is an Ethernet/LAN port on the back below the component input, what is it for? Is this not a SmartTV with widgets?

yufool wrote:I really love my 40" version of this SmartTV. Apps, internet browsing and video games rock. There was one dead pixel though. Can't wait to have this in my bedroom

Can be used as a giant computer monitor since it supports 1920 x 1080 as long as you have HDMI.

2011 versions of samsung screens hold their own against 2013 models from other brands!



jmbunkin


quality posts: 28 Private Messages jmbunkin

Scanned the comments and did not see this question,does anyone know the cost of extra 3D glasses for this TV?

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
yorrick wrote:I don't think 3D is just a gimmick. I think the current 3D movie fad may pass, but I think the 3D sports will soon take off.



I agree. Since TV is losing viewership, mostly to video games and the Internet, they need something to bring viewers back in. 3D is the only innovation I can think of, using current technologies. Interestingly, 3D television has been discussed since the 1950's. An episode of the sitcom, The Honeymooners, had Ralph saying that he won't buy a TV until there is 3D. Sports is a natural for 3D technology since viewers strive for the you-are-there feeling. I beleive parts of World Cup Soccer aired in 3D, as was parts of the London Olympics. I watched the opening and closing ceremonies in 3D (using anaglyph glasses) and they were spectacular.

russwjohns


quality posts: 16 Private Messages russwjohns
sdc100 wrote:It's not expensive when you consider that:

3) It has Internet features, i.e. a web browser, YouTube, etc and you can add apps.
4) It has a media player built-in to play virtually every format
5) It's media hub that can play media off any computer hooked into your network
6) It's 1080p when many 32" HDTVs are only 720p

So even if you don't plan on using 3D, this seems like a good value at $379.



Smart TV features? Where does this info come from? Certainly not from the data Woot has listed here.

russwjohns


quality posts: 16 Private Messages russwjohns
sdc100 wrote:FYI ... The major difference, of course, is that 3D TV requires the wearing of glasses, which is annoying. And that's unlikely to change in the next few decades.



It is rumored that Toshiba has been developing a 3D panel that does not require glasses although the initial panels were small in size. This was a couple years ago, so unless that development was a bust, it won't be decades. ;^)

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
jmbunkin wrote:Scanned the comments and did not see this question,does anyone know the cost of extra 3D glasses for this TV?



I worry that they may not be readily available since this is a Latin American model. I don't know if any US model uses the same technnology. The glasses appear to be passive, and not the active glasses most 3D TVs use.

Actually, if you look closely, the lenses appear blue and yellow/amber. If so, then it's simply a variation of the anaglyphic red/cyan glasses in use since the 1950s. Blue/yellow has less of an effect on colors than red/cyan so movies appear much more natural, and you get fewer headaches. It's the same technology used in 3D converters like the $40 3D Video Wizard, which Woot has sold in the past. It allows you to watch 3D movies on normal 2D TVs.

If the glasses are simply anaglyphic blue/yellow, then you can probably just use glasses made for 3D converters like the 3D Video Wizard. For example, Amazon sells 2 pairs for $12.95.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
russwjohns wrote:It is rumored that Toshiba has been developing a 3D panel that does not require glasses although the initial panels were small in size. This was a couple years ago, so unless that development was a bust, it won't be decades. ;^)



Large 3D panels not requiring glasses have been shown at CES for years. From what I understand, they all have VERY narrow viewing angles. In other words, you have to view the image prety much straight on, in the middle. It's a variation of the parallaz grating used in the handheld Nintendo 3D game and those old 1970s 3D postcards. I know of no other way to prevent the right eye from seeing an image meant only for the left eye, and vice versa without using glasses. Whether you use colors (aka anaglyphic), polarized filters or active shutters, something has to be front of the eyes, and that requires glasses.

nappyho


quality posts: 2 Private Messages nappyho

if this is not a smart tv what is the network connector for? if i plug the tv network port on to my home network, will it show as a device on my network, and will movie directories on my network hard drive appear on the tv graphic?

jmbunkin


quality posts: 28 Private Messages jmbunkin
sdc100 wrote:I worry that they may not be readily available since this is a Latin American model. I don't know if any US model uses the same technnology. The glasses appear to be passive, and not the active glasses most 3D TVs use.

Actually, if you look closely, the lenses appear blue and yellow/amber. If so, then it's simply a variation of the anaglyphic red/cyan glasses in use since the 1950s. Blue/yellow has less of an effect on colors than red/cyan so movies appear much more natural, and you get fewer headaches. It's the same technology used in 3D converters like the $40 3D Video Wizard, which Woot has sold in the past. It allows you to watch 3D movies on normal 2D TVs.

If the glasses are simply anaglyphic blue/yellow, then you can probably just use glasses made for 3D converters like the 3D Video Wizard. For example, Amazon sells 2 pairs for $12.95.



Thanks but "SMEAGOL150" said this earlier
"Samsung E series TVs all use active 3d. The glasses coming with it are battery-powered and are not rechargeable. They use one CR2032 which in my experience gives about 35 hours of battery life."