WootBot


quality posts: 15 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Welcome to another in our occasional series of debates about the least significant issues of our time. Today Jason Toon and Matthew Norman debate whether escalators should always be walked, and whether it's permissible to confront those who block the way...

What's Your Hurry? by Jason Toon

It's a type that anyone who's ever worked in a high-rise office will recognize: the hustling go-getter who's just gotta get to the top of that escalator three seconds before everybody else. This antisocial stair-climber doesn't live in a world of autonomous human beings. To him, other people are merely obstacles between him and his transcendently important destination. Ken Lay and Ivan Boesky would approve.

And woe betide the ignoramuses who offend her sense of self-importance by, you know, standing there minding their own business. "One side, slowpoke! I've got vital work to do! Those expense reports aren't gonna file themselves!"

There's nothing wrong with walking up an escalator per se. I do it myself sometimes. When the escalator is empty, or when everyone is occupying the correct side (standers to the right), there's no harm in trotting up a few steps. The time-saving benefit is a total illusion, of course - I'm sure these hustlers squander more time every day vacillating over the choice between venti or grande. But as long as they're not getting on anybody's nerves, no big whoop.

What really makes me want to clip their Achilles tendons is when they have the gall to tap someone's shoulder, or squeeze around them, or ask them to get out of the way. It's obviously, again, not about the delay. By the time the rider has figured out what this pushy, self-important jerk is so worked up about, both walker and rider have usually reached the top of the escalator anyway. So what's the point? It's the principle!

And that principle is: the walker wants you to know that she's superior to slothful, inconsiderate, insignificant you. She understands how this works and she's got important things to do so you should be thanking her for educating you about your faults.

Most people understand that you stand on the right and walk on the left. The rule is so ubiquitously followed that the rare violators are clearly just unfamiliar with this milieu. They haven't had occasion to ride escalators in office buildings much and they probably won't be doing it a lot in the future. Whether you say anything to them or not, chances are they're never going to block your path on this escalator ever again, so "educating" them about it is a pointless instance of social friction.

Unless the point is to spike your morning coffee with a jolt of smug superiority.

Anyway, what's wrong with taking a brief breather after hiking to the building from your bus stop? Here in Seattle, nobody lacks opportunities to walk up inclines. Showing up at work sweaty and disheveled may be your idea of fun, but forgive the rest of us for not sharing your bizarre masochistic fetish.

Escalators were invented for a reason, and I, for one, take the side of scientific advancement. Insisting that escalators must always be walked is a denial of rationality, humanism, and the entire Enlightenment tradition. I doubt any of these neo-cavemen forego modern dentistry or plumbing. But when it comes to escalators, evidently humans must supplicate themselves before the tyranny of altitude.

I'm happy to report that I myself have never been asked to step aside by an aggressive escalator climber. Because if I had, it's possible I'd be writing this from a jail cell. This escalator's a public place, and that dude's got as much right to my space as I have to barge into his stall in the restroom. But on second thought, maybe I would let him pass - after all, it would get that uptight ninny out of my company a few seconds sooner. And apparently a few seconds makes all the difference.

Get Out Of The Way by Matthew Norman

Jason, you're astonishingly obtuse.

First, what kind of person, in this age of epidemic obesity, wastes synaptic firings defending flabby, slothful slobs' right to stand still on moving stairways? A little walking up stairs would be just the thing for this once-great-in-the-sense-of-being-excellent, now-great-in-the-sense-of-being-physically-large nation. Escalator standers are what's wrong with America.

But let's set aside the problem of our gross national fitness. (And I do mean gross.) Let's just say that, for some perverse reason, your vision for the future of America is that we should all adopt the Huttese ideal of beauty, and regard our bodies as nothing more than support systems for the thumbs we need to play Nintendo.

Even then, I think we can all agree that it is, in fact, a longstanding convention of escalator etiquette that the right-hand side is for standers (e.g. the elderly, the handicapped, and persons carrying oversized loads of any kind, be they luggage or body mass) and the left-hand side is for normal escalator use. That is, walking. All we're really arguing about is how to deal with people too oblivious or too selfish to know about it or care to heed it.

Apparently, you regard it as somehow rude for decent citizens to interrupt these idiots' ignorant reveries by tapping them on the shoulder and asserting our right to freely pass.

Dude. DUDE.

When someone has to tell you you're blocking the way -- on an escalator, in traffic, or at the front of the line at a deli where you've somehow arrived before giving any thought to what you might order -- that person's not being rude. He's letting you know that YOU are. And he's doing you a favor.

Offering that kind of negative feedback is not only acceptable; it's ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL to enforce the social customs by which civilization is governed.

If no one's gonna give me a hard time about it, why don't I cut in line at the bank? Or take cell phone calls at the movies? Or double-dip in community hummus? Or -- yeah, that's right -- block the walking lane by standing still on an escalator?

Flouting the unwritten prohibitions on such behavior betrays a deeply selfish attitude -- an attitude that one's personal convenience trumps any consideration of the needs of others. This is the mindset of irredeemable narcissists. It is the attitude of sociopaths. It is the attitude of children. It is imperative that we call out these cretins wherever we see them, and condition them to understand that the rules apply to everyone.

For the future of human society, and also because COME ON, SOME OF US HAVE PLACES TO GO, left-side escalator loiterers simply MUST be confronted.

Photos (top to bottom):
Eeyore on the Escalator by Flickr user Annie Mole
Kiss by Flickr user pedrosimoes7
Parliament Station Escalator by Flickr user AdamSelwood
Used under a Creative Commons license

crapface


quality posts: 3 Private Messages crapface

The worst is the people standing on the airport moving sidewalks when you're about to miss a flight. Brian Regan articulates my sentiments quite well.

eeraser


quality posts: 0 Private Messages eeraser

Jason, look at an escalator for what it is, an accelerator ramp! It is not designed to give you a slow vertical ride, but rather give you a shorter staircase to climb. Unless you are 80 years old, or one of those mothers that thinks it's OK to take a double-wide stroller filled with 3 kids on an accelerating staircase, then ride away. If you want to go slow, then take the elevator and enjoy those crazy teenagers breaking wind in a confined space just because they can.

Jason Toon


quality posts: 19 Private Messages Jason Toon
eeraser wrote:Jason, look at an escalator for what it is, an accelerator ramp! It is not designed to give you a slow vertical ride, but rather give you a shorter staircase to climb.



Says who? I think that's the minority opinion. In the time I spent on Flickr looking for escalator photos, I found exactly three that showed anyone in motion compared to 20+ of people just riding.

And before anyone blames obese, slothful Americans, most of them (including all three I used in this post, which are from England, Portugal, and Australia) were from other countries.

Again, I don't think there's anything wrong with walking up the escalator. But let's not pretend it's a social norm on the level with not talking on the phone at the movies.

kaplanfx


quality posts: 2 Private Messages kaplanfx
eeraser wrote:Jason, look at an escalator for what it is, an accelerator ramp! It is not designed to give you a slow vertical ride, but rather give you a shorter staircase to climb. Unless you are 80 years old, or one of those mothers that thinks it's OK to take a double-wide stroller filled with 3 kids on an accelerating staircase, then ride away. If you want to go slow, then take the elevator and enjoy those crazy teenagers breaking wind in a confined space just because they can.



This is EXACTLY correct. The office building is a bad example. Try riding a commuter train every day and getting off in an underground station with a long narrow escalator (only 1 wide) and a single set of stairs that can accommodate 1 set of folks going up and one set of folks going down. This is what I deal with every morning. The escalator isn't designed to move people faster, it's designed to move MORE people in a SHORTER time when, for instance, they all get off the train at the same time. Instead someone always walks extremely slow up the one set of stairs, and someone sits on the escalator, and the line backs up 50 yards while everyone trying to get to work stands around and waits for a spot on either the escalator or stairs.

pooflady


quality posts: 20 Private Messages pooflady

If you want to walk up steps, why not take the stairway? I think most buildings have them.



When I was a kid I wanted to be older, this CRAP is NOT what I expected.

sutefani


quality posts: 8 Private Messages sutefani

as a native floridian, i never understood the point kaplanfx makes until my first trip to new york city. now i get it, but it's a lost cause here in florida, where everyone stands around on escalators while staring at their smart phones.

kaplanfx wrote:This is EXACTLY correct. The office building is a bad example. Try riding a commuter train every day and getting off in an underground station with a long narrow escalator (only 1 wide) and a single set of stairs that can accommodate 1 set of folks going up and one set of folks going down. This is what I deal with every morning. The escalator isn't designed to move people faster, it's designed to move MORE people in a SHORTER time when, for instance, they all get off the train at the same time. Instead someone always walks extremely slow up the one set of stairs, and someone sits on the escalator, and the line backs up 50 yards while everyone trying to get to work stands around and waits for a spot on either the escalator or stairs.



Azuaron


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Azuaron

I'm typically a stander (my knees aren't in the best condition, and walking up too many stairs can become painful), but I will still explain why Jason is obviously wrong, and why it is absolutely insane of him to try and argue otherwise:

Jason acknowledges there is a "correct" side and a "wrong" side of the escalator to stand on. Since there is a "correct" side and a "wrong" side for standing, people standing on the "wrong" side are, by definition, WROOOOOONNNNG. By his own admission. Wrong. They are wrong.

If standing about on the walker side of the escalator was an acceptable societal action, it wouldn't be the walker side, would it? The walker side and stander side distinction would not have arisen.

Arguing that standers can lounge on the walker side is like arguing for the parking of cars in intersections. "What? You self-important losers have to go somewhere? Leave me alone, I'm parked here! Stop being so selfish with your time."

Jason Toon


quality posts: 19 Private Messages Jason Toon
Azuaron wrote:...Jason acknowledges there is a "correct" side and a "wrong" side of the escalator to stand on. Since there is a "correct" side and a "wrong" side for standing, people standing on the "wrong" side are, by definition, WROOOOOONNNNG. By his own admission. Wrong. They are wrong...

Arguing that standers can lounge on the walker side is like arguing for the parking of cars in intersections. "What? You self-important losers have to go somewhere? Leave me alone, I'm parked here! Stop being so selfish with your time."



You're right, I don't dispute that there's a right and wrong side. My argument boils down to "It's not that big a deal."

In our building, you have to take escalators up a few floors to reach the elevators. I can't count the number of times some dude has walked past me on the escalator (which, again, I have no problem with) who then winds up in the same elevator with me.

Parking in the middle of an intersection prevents anyone from driving through the intersection. The right analogy would be to someone blocking the entrance to the escalator, which is clearly obnoxious.

Standing on an escalator just delays everyone's arrival by a handful of seconds - not enough to possibly make a difference to when anyone reaches their destination. And hence, in my opinion, nothing that's worth getting worked up about.

(And believe me, I'm good at getting worked up about petty annoyances.)

Jason Toon


quality posts: 19 Private Messages Jason Toon
kaplanfx wrote:This is EXACTLY correct. The office building is a bad example. Try riding a commuter train every day and getting off in an underground station with a long narrow escalator (only 1 wide) and a single set of stairs that can accommodate 1 set of folks going up and one set of folks going down. This is what I deal with every morning. The escalator isn't designed to move people faster, it's designed to move MORE people in a SHORTER time when, for instance, they all get off the train at the same time. Instead someone always walks extremely slow up the one set of stairs, and someone sits on the escalator, and the line backs up 50 yards while everyone trying to get to work stands around and waits for a spot on either the escalator or stairs.



It sounds like the issue there is bad design. Some people are always going to walk slower than others. If one stander or slow walker causes a logjam that bad, the problem is not with that person.

Azuaron


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Azuaron
Jason Toon wrote:...in my opinion, nothing that's worth getting worked up about.

(And believe me, I'm good at getting worked up about petty annoyances.)



Should I ever have the opportunity, I will be sure to:

1. Use the urinal right next to the one you're using

2. Talk on my cell phone, loudly, at the table next to yours in a restaurant

3. Speak--at great length--about just how adorable my two little kittens are (and they are really, REALLY adorable. Really, I swear, like, omigod), even interrupting whatever nonsense you're saying to talk about them

4. Check my text messages in the seat in front of yours at the movies, holding my phone above my head to ensure I can continue watching the movie (and shine that light right into your face). What? I'm not making any noise, it's cool.

5. Have a conversation in a hallway that you have to walk down. We'll be sure to stand close enough to each other that you're going to feel really awkward walking between us, but close enough to the walls that you can't slip behind either of us. Then, after you've gotten passed us, we'll complain about the inconsiderate jerk who interrupted our conversation.

And any other petty social contracts I can think of breaking that are, really, "nothing that's worth getting worked up about." Such as cutting in front of you in every line you stand in.

You can claim escalator/stair backups are the fault of the design, which may be a contributor, but that's still not an excuse for one person to hold up everyone else. The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the one, my dear sir. Especially the laziness/infirmity of the one.

Basically, following social contracts isn't about what you, personally, think. They're about what society thinks. You don't get to pick and choose, "I'll take a side of 'silent cell phones in the theater,' but could you hold the 'standing on the correct side of the escalator'?" That just makes you an egocentric who people curse under their breath.

Finally, how hard is it to stand on the correct side? How inconvenienced are you by following the social contract? Oh, what was that? I didn't quite hear you. Not at all? Then what possible downside is there by following it? You help other people? You facilitate walking traffic? Are you that much of a Grinch that this little act of kindness would cause your heart to grow too big and burst, killing you?

I am suddenly reminded of a Dennis Leary song: "I drive really slow/In the ultra-fast lane/While people, behind me, are going insane/I'm an a******, yes an a******, what an a******!".

(Side note: you take an escalator to get to an elevator? Talk about bad design...)

lulipuli


quality posts: 1 Private Messages lulipuli

If your legs work, use them. Period.

For the record, I always use the stairs instead of an escalator when available.

luminaseeker


quality posts: 4 Private Messages luminaseeker

If the point of the first half of this post is that walking up an escalator only saves you a few seconds, then nothing more need be said. A few seconds multiplied by a couple hundred thousand commuters in a day is quite a significant time savings. And one person standing in the "walk up" lane is going to compound that time penalty across quite a few people. And by legitimizing people standing on the left, even more people will be delayed.

I mean, isn't it pretty clear by now that traffic jams are caused by just a few people slowing down on a highway causing a ripple effect that inconveniences people miles further back?

ActorTom


quality posts: 2 Private Messages ActorTom

Escalators are for riding, not climbing. It is ok to pass on a moving walkway.

Here's what the manufacturer (Otis) says:
When riding escalators and moving walkways, follow these guidelines.
• On escalators, stand in the center of the step and face forward.
• On moving walkways, stationary passengers should stay to the right and let those walking pass on the left.
• Keep feet away from the sides.
• Keep a steady grip on the handrail.
• Don’t rest your handbag or parcels on the handrail.
• Pay attention to the moving walkway—don’t be distracted by your surroundings.
• Don’t lean against or over the sides.
• Don’t run.
• Never sit on the escalator step or moving walk.
• Parents, make sure children ride in a proper manner.

Note the first instruction STAND IN THE CENTER OF THE STEP and face forward. (emphasis added)



matthew


quality posts: 20 Private Messages matthew

"What's the rush" is one of those things people who aren't in a hurry ask people who are, as if the flight I'm about to miss is actually just an opportunity to reflect on how I've got my priorities all messed up.

stingray69


quality posts: 4 Private Messages stingray69

Next time debate which is the proper direction to install a roll of toilet paper. Should the paper roll off from the top or the bottom?

ActorTom


quality posts: 2 Private Messages ActorTom
matthew wrote:"What's the rush" is one of those things people who aren't in a hurry ask people who are, as if the flight I'm about to miss is actually just an opportunity to reflect on how I've got my priorities all messed up.



Try leaving a little earlier and not booking your connecting flights unrealistically close-together....

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 584 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

ActorTom wrote:Try leaving a little earlier and not booking your connecting flights unrealistically close-together....

And scheduling flights to avoid snow storms that exceed weather predictions?



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pohatu771


quality posts: 2 Private Messages pohatu771

I agree with the idea that the right side is for standing, and the left for walking. I've never considered what to do on a single-width escalator, however... I rarely come across those.

Several years ago, I was in Toronto with my then-girlfriend's father. We're from a rural town outside a small city, where "escalator etiquette" isn't followed as it is in larger cities, so I warned him - the left is for walking. If you stand there, you'll get pushed out of the way.

Puffing out his chest, he proclaimed "no one will push me," only to be pushed on our very next escalator.

It remains one of the best moments of my life.

katygirl


quality posts: 2 Private Messages katygirl

I agree with Jason - it's just not that big of a deal. I understand if people are occasionally running late for work or for a flight, but it gets annoying when those who travel in a perpetual frenzy expect all others to make concessions for their rush. Overall, patience is far too rare.

ActorTom


quality posts: 2 Private Messages ActorTom
ThunderThighs wrote:And scheduling flights to avoid snow storms that exceed weather predictions?



...and go naked to shorten TSA screenings.

bluejuh


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bluejuh

As far as I'm concerned: Escalators are for walking up, not standing on. If you want to change floors without using your legs: That's what elevators are for.

dtristano


quality posts: 3 Private Messages dtristano
Jason Toon wrote:You're right, I don't dispute that there's a right and wrong side. My argument boils down to "It's not that big a deal."



No, I'm sorry, it *is* a big deal. Matthew had it correct: If someone has to tell you you're in the way, then you're being rude. This applies to way more than just escalators -- too often folks are in their own little worlds and fail to offer the tiniest bit of effort that would make things move more smoothly for everyone, whether in traffic, on sidewalks, in check out lines, or escalators.

trycorp


quality posts: 0 Private Messages trycorp

In Japan everyone knows that if they are going to stand still, step off to the right side and let others get by. People often have places to go with time constraints. Especially at airports and train stations.

Taking up the whole walk way or standing still on the wrong side of the escalator is rude, and they should be informed they are violating important etiquette. Not etiquette for etiquette's sake, but etiquette that can cost people around them significant amounts of time and money.

Jason Toon


quality posts: 19 Private Messages Jason Toon
trycorp wrote:Taking up the whole walk way or standing still on the wrong side of the escalator is rude, and they should be informed they are violating important etiquette.



You should let Otis, the manufacturer of the escalators, know that they're advising people incorrectly on how to use their product.

Jason Toon


quality posts: 19 Private Messages Jason Toon
matthew wrote:"What's the rush" is one of those things people who aren't in a hurry ask people who are, as if the flight I'm about to miss is actually just an opportunity to reflect on how I've got my priorities all messed up.



You catch flights in our office building? What, is there a helipad on the roof?

Jason Toon


quality posts: 19 Private Messages Jason Toon
Azuaron wrote:The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the one, my dear sir. Especially the laziness/infirmity of the one.



In other words, the elderly, disabled, and obese should be locked away (or maybe euthanized, that's more efficient) so they don't delay us in reaching our cubicles. What importance are their lives compared to the "needs of the many", no matter how petty those "needs" might be? "Infirmity" is no excuse for interfering with the efficient operation of society!

Have I accurately summed up your argument there?

Azuaron wrote:Finally, how hard is it to stand on the correct side? How inconvenienced are you by following the social contract?



As I keep saying, I DO follow it. The question here is what to do about people who don't. You apparently come down on the side of imprisonment and euthanasia, which strikes me as a little extreme.

dontwantaname


quality posts: 13 Private Messages dontwantaname

Volunteer Moderator

crapface wrote:The worst is the people standing on the airport moving sidewalks when you're about to miss a flight. Brian Regan articulates my sentiments quite well.




The moving sidewalks are to make the walk faster.
They are suppose to be walked on.

The escalator is so you don't have to climb the stairs!
If it is wide enough, the standers should be on the right and all you guys in a hurry can be on the left.
That way everyone is happy.

WE LURV YOU TOO! Dork!!!
No greater love is lost than that not shared.

bsmith1


quality posts: 104 Private Messages bsmith1

I think is funny to see people waiting in line to use the escalator at an airport or convention center when the stairs (right next to it) are nearly desolate. People don't seem to realize that the stairs are actually faster if you're somewhat sprightly.

The moving sidewalks at airports are wide enough to stand aside and let those in a hurry go past you if you don't want to walk. Some people become disoriented walking on something that's moving, so I understand if they choose to stand. I like to walk on the moving sidewalks because I feel like I'm super-fast! (I tried to clock the speed with GPS app once, but no reliable signal indoors)

Escalators are another issue altogether. They aren't very wide and most people find it easier to stand than to walk up/down 'em. I don't think I ever walk up or down them except for a few steps when getting on or off. (running start kind of approach to deal with the momentum change)

In summary, I support a walking lane and a standing lane on the moving sidewalks, but not on escalators. What if elevators consisted of a moving climbing rope that you could just hold onto or climb up/down? Would you wait for the rope to move or would you start climbing to save yourself a second or two? It's just not worth the extra effort and the inconvenience to others.

EDIT: Additionally, walking on escalators is only for people with poor time management skills. ;)

tgentry


quality posts: 111 Private Messages tgentry

Staff

What I want to know is why people are freaking out when I use the escalators as a proxy treadmill. I'm getting fit here people. I'm part of the solution.

matthew


quality posts: 20 Private Messages matthew
Jason Toon wrote:You catch flights in our office building?



Our office building is one of those places where there aren't stairs alongside the escalator for people who prefer to spend less than fifteen minutes ascending one flight. (That's only one flaw on a long list of ways in which the building is poorly designed.)

I don't catch flights where we work, but I do often have pressing business here that has me in kind of a hurry -- and if I were you I'd be a little less eager to advertise that you don't! Who knows when the boss might read one of these threads?!

matthew


quality posts: 20 Private Messages matthew
bsmith1 wrote:What if elevators consisted of a moving climbing rope that you could just hold onto or climb up/down? Would you wait for the rope to move or would you start climbing to save yourself a second or two?



The better analogy is: What if you had the choice of taking the stairs instead of the elevator? In many cases where they do have that choice, people prefer the manual option.

bsmith1


quality posts: 104 Private Messages bsmith1
matthew wrote:...for people who prefer to spend less than fifteen minutes ascending one flight...



15 minutes?! Is that for the elevator or escalator? In searching for the longest escalator, which takes only like 3 minutes to ride, I found this...
That made me grin...

If your escalator takes 15 minutes, you should have a repair man come take a look. You sure you're not trying to go up the down?

raebee


quality posts: 21 Private Messages raebee

I'm personally mad it's not socially acceptable to run all the time. I hate walking it's a waste of time. Yes I'm that person you see that's power walking everywhere. People think it's crazy but I miss the days when I was younger and people didn't give a second glance to people me running from place to place. I mean yeah it only saves 30 seconds or so on a short jaunt but when covering long distances you can gain valuable time plus it's good for the cardio. I used to run to all my classes on campus and I was in much better shape, I also could leave a good 5 minutes later than everyone and that time adds up. Maybe I'm crazy maybe I'm efficient. All I know is that the left side is for walking when possible. Some people just like to be in motion all the time, for me the faster the better, who are you to judge. I don't judge people for standing around, I'm sure they have their reasons.


Where do you find a Roomba? At the Innba!

bsmith1


quality posts: 104 Private Messages bsmith1
raebee wrote:I'm personally mad it's not socially acceptable to run all the time...



Back in college, we had quite a few international students from Asia. They were always running around campus (even indoors), so I reckon that's socially acceptable in those parts. Us U.S.A.-ian students, meanwhile, just slugged along with our giant backpacks stuffed full of crap that we probably didn't need.
I always thought, "You know, it'd be nice to jog to my car to save some time", but I guess I was too worried how others would perceive a dude jogging in street clothes. Reflecting on that example, I can see your point.

bloatedsack


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bloatedsack

mmhmm, welcome to TCC.

wisesage


quality posts: 3 Private Messages wisesage

The point that everyone is missing (or ignoring) is the way that moving quickly makes you feel. We all seem to agree that it doesn't really get you where you are going any quicker (unless you are the last one on the elevator that you would have missed if you hadn't hustled), so clearly these people who feel the need to hurry up and wait must be getting something from their efforts. I propose that most of them (not you, obviously) are doing it for their mental health. Take, for instance, that guy in the blue sweater. If he didn't rush up the escalator he would loose that little extra boost of oxytocin and would fall back into the grips of a terminal heroin addiction and would probably commit suicide. That lady in the gray cardigan? She would loose the ability to cope with that creepy guy from accounting who always hits on her, and she would then go on a psychotic shooting rampage using all the training she had learned from her father who suffered from massive PTSD and survivors guilt.

So you see, it's not that it's the right thing to do, or that you might save 15 seconds, it's survival.

sometimes i like to put on the cape and scream like a monkey.

ajmartinez51


quality posts: 2 Private Messages ajmartinez51

I don't know about all this right/wrong side, but when I get a chance to walk up an escalator, I will. I like the feeling of walking faster up an incline. Makes me feel less like a lumbering dolt.

dontwantaname


quality posts: 13 Private Messages dontwantaname

Volunteer Moderator

raebee wrote:I'm personally mad it's not socially acceptable to run all the time. I hate walking it's a waste of time. Yes I'm that person you see that's power walking everywhere. People think it's crazy but I miss the days when I was younger and people didn't give a second glance to people me running from place to place. I mean yeah it only saves 30 seconds or so on a short jaunt but when covering long distances you can gain valuable time plus it's good for the cardio. I used to run to all my classes on campus and I was in much better shape, I also could leave a good 5 minutes later than everyone and that time adds up. Maybe I'm crazy maybe I'm efficient. All I know is that the left side is for walking when possible. Some people just like to be in motion all the time, for me the faster the better, who are you to judge. I don't judge people for standing around, I'm sure they have their reasons.



Move to Manhattan. Walking there is fast.

WE LURV YOU TOO! Dork!!!
No greater love is lost than that not shared.

ActorTom


quality posts: 2 Private Messages ActorTom

Another safety point against using escalators as stairs, is that they are not designed as, and do not meet the building code for stairs. See this State of Oregon Building Codes Division Safety Memo

Stairways must be at least 44" wide, but escalators can be as narrow as 40". Stair steps cannot rise more than 7", whereas the escalator steps rise a minimum of 8" and a maximum of 8.5". Stairways are required to have a landing every 12', there is no such requirement for escalators.