pumpkee


quality posts: 0 Private Messages pumpkee

A word of advice-DON'T ever eat/drink anything hot from a plastic container!, When heated,plastic gives off very bad xenoestrogen chemicals. Trust me,stainless steel inside would be a much safer bet,and these apparently are plastic.

smoo93


quality posts: 0 Private Messages smoo93

I think I suffered an aneurism from laughing so hard at that picture caption...

rlansford


quality posts: 1 Private Messages rlansford

Definitely the best coffee mug I've found. Super excited to find this deal!

lasallecoholic


quality posts: 0 Private Messages lasallecoholic

im really banking on this thing not leaking. my car still stinks like hot toddy from my last "non-leaking" travel mug

bootawoot


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bootawoot
pkphilip wrote:I have been using Contigo AutoSeal mugs, 2 for $20 in Costco, stainless steel outside and inside, just the top is plastic. Mine has been dropped, dented, paints came off.. and it is still leaked proof, good in the car and in my backpack.

Most important thing is.. keep drinks hot/warm for hours.

Their new models comes with rubber foot, so that paints will not get scratched off.

Maxim magazine did a tests on all these mugs:
http://www.maxim.com/amg/STUFF/Articles/Don't+Spill+the+Beans!Here

http://www.contigo.ie/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Maxim-March-2011-West-Loop-test-vs-others1.pdf and Here



I have been using the Contigo mugs from Costco for a few years and they do seal very tight. The only problem I have with them is the pull tab on top breaks off. The thin metal pin that holds it on rusts and breaks. Could be from putting it in the dishwasher.

I'm in for a pair of 2-pks. It gets frustrating trying to find one that doesn't leak.

john3v30


quality posts: 0 Private Messages john3v30

Don't know how well this keeps drinks hot/cold, but my favorite mug by far is the insulated mug from Kleen Kanteen. No handle, but it's kept drinks cold for an ungodly amount of time in 90+ deg car. I literally still had ice after 6+ hrs in a hot car in the summer. It handles hot drinks well too. Cool to touch piping hot for hours. Unbelievable. It is considerably more $ though.

http://www.kleankanteen.com/products/insulated/klean-kanteen-insulated-20oz.php

wootangie


quality posts: 0 Private Messages wootangie

In for 2. I mean, 4...

sheaitisnotso


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sheaitisnotso
brianbloom wrote:It's a fair bit more costly than these Stanleys, but I've been quite happy with my Nissan Leak-proof Travel Mug 14oz (search amazon or elsewhere for JMQ400). Never leaked a drop and been using several years now. About only complaint has been keeping the threads clean - can be a little stiff to open now after all these years, especially if contents have cooled and created a vacuum. But no regrets...



YES! I've been using the Nissan Thermos Mug JMH402 for a good 5 years now and it is still the best. Meanwhile my Wife needs a new mug every year as those dumb plastic Starbucks ones don't hold up very well. And the Nissan is stainless inside as opposed to the plastic.

SharpEagle


quality posts: 0 Private Messages SharpEagle
scharton wrote:Plastic inner liner. No thanks.



I was thinking it would be a good deal and then I spotted the plastic inside.. I coal to drink plastic coffee. ruins the taste.. yech..

grenade01


quality posts: 6 Private Messages grenade01

I have one of these. Plastic tastes like plastic and they are not travel mugs they are thermos's's's. There's nowhere to drink from just a screw off lid.

squirrel52


quality posts: 1 Private Messages squirrel52

I'm worried that these won't fit in my cupholders. Does anyone know the size of the base?

mgarns


quality posts: 1 Private Messages mgarns

I once drove away with this coffee cup on the roof of my truck. It fell off and hit the concrete HARD. There was a scrape on the stainless but it didn't break or leak!

RandyMillerIII


quality posts: 3 Private Messages RandyMillerIII

Almost didn't see that comma in the caption. I was just about to throw some peons on the George Foreman.

therealjrn


quality posts: 51 Private Messages therealjrn
grenade01 wrote:I have one of these. Plastic tastes like plastic and they are not travel mugs they are thermos's's's. There's nowhere to drink from just a screw off lid.



Not to be quarrelsome, but what you have is a different mug from these--hence the "An easy-open drink-thru lid turns left for drinking and right to close" in the description--the pictures posted make this quite clear.

Happy 10th Woot!

therealjrn


quality posts: 51 Private Messages therealjrn
squirrel52 wrote:I'm worried that these won't fit in my cupholders. Does anyone know the size of the base?



These cups are so awesome they will fit every cup-holder of everybody not reading the several times this question has been answered in the thread above. I've done the same though--it is easier to just ask the question than read through the posts.

Happy 10th Woot!

highnote


quality posts: 2 Private Messages highnote

Hello - I am from STANLEY and wanted to help answer some questions:

The base diameter is 2.75 in, same as the top. It is 3.5inches from the base to the bottom of the handle. The mug is 7 3/4 in tall. the diameter at the widest point including the handle is 4.5inches. Auto cupholders vary greatly, and there is not an industry standard in diameter or height clearance. We develop our travel mugs to fit in 80% plus of the cupholders.

The liner and lid are Polypropylene, which is an inert plastic. This is the same plastic used in Tupperware, soda bottle lids, yogurt containers, etc.

As far as heat retention, most double wall mugs are built for about 45minutes to 1 hour. In general, the longest consumer commute time is in the NY area and is 45 minutes. This mug is designed to keep coffee at a drinkable temperature based upon that as a benchmark.

highnote


quality posts: 2 Private Messages highnote
Maniac11919 wrote:"Leak-Proof Travel Mug???"

1. Leak proof? I should hope that a MUG would be LEAK PROOF...

2. I hope these aren't refurbs...

3. Where can I find the non-leak-proof version?





Most travel mugs on the market are not leak proof and many that are marketed as "leak proof" are not. This is a production overun based upon color and packaging.

shepardcchs


quality posts: 1 Private Messages shepardcchs

Best mug I've ever had. They are leak proof, and won't The Star Wars Holiday Special (1978) when you drive off with them on the top of your car (just dent it up a little). They fit my cup holders just fine and keep hot liquids warm for a moderate amount of time. I paid $9 at the big box store, which surprisingly doesn't have too many big boxes. This is a great deal. THANK YOU WOOT!!!

highnote


quality posts: 2 Private Messages highnote
pumpkee wrote:A word of advice-DON'T ever eat/drink anything hot from a plastic container!, When heated,plastic gives off very bad xenoestrogen chemicals. Trust me,stainless steel inside would be a much safer bet,and these apparently are plastic.



Not all plastics do that. this plastic, Polypropylene is an inert material and is BPA free. Not all plastics contain BPA. This material and mug are all FDA tested and approved.

QuickTurtle


quality posts: 0 Private Messages QuickTurtle

I used to work for the company that manufactures Stanley products and know all of the product designers / engineers personally. Trust me - all Stanley products are high quality and over-engineered for functionality and durability.

On multiple instances I observed consumers bringing damaged (read: abused) products to their headquarters in Seattle, WA, only to have the product replaced without question and free of charge. With this product at this price point, you won't regret the purchase.

daisyterp


quality posts: 0 Private Messages daisyterp

Even BPA free plastic makes me nervous. BPA free doesn't not mean it's totally safe from leaching chemicals- especially when used for hot beverages.
We have 3 totally stainless travel mugs, always looking for another 1 or 2 though since they get left in the car, dishwasher, etc. Sad that this isn't totally stainless.



Pupator


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Pupator
daisyterp wrote:Even BPA free plastic makes me nervous. BPA free doesn't not mean it's totally safe from leaching chemicals- especially when used for hot beverages.
We have 3 totally stainless travel mugs, always looking for another 1 or 2 though since they get left in the car, dishwasher, etc. Sad that this isn't totally stainless.



Source?

buffaloed


quality posts: 28 Private Messages buffaloed
Scooley01 wrote:quote: Roostalee scharton wrote:Plastic inner liner. No thanks.


Yeah, I made that mistake once. Plasticky coffee isn't so great.


Actually, my big issue with this is coffee-y plastic. It starts to smell after a while and no amount of cleaning will make it stop smelling. It's a cheap deal, but I'm passing this time.

(Not sure why the Quote BBCode isn't working for me...)



Martha Stewart tip of the day: pick up some denture cleaning tablets at the dollar store, fill it with water, and toss a couple in. You can also put the entire lid in a tupperware type container and use the same method.

worldwidewebfeet


quality posts: 33 Private Messages worldwidewebfeet

Wowie, drink proof and and leak through.

Everything wanted in a travel mug!

jigeersgreen2


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jigeersgreen2

In for six more. Great stocking stuffer deal. Thanks Uncle Woot.

mommatoclaire


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mommatoclaire

Yeah that sucks! I was ready to pull the trigger until I saw the plastic inside. I need a fully stainless steel travel mug. I prefer no chemical additives to my coffee.

yuqimao


quality posts: 3 Private Messages yuqimao

Since we now know these mugs are made from Polypropylene, I have been reading the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for this chemical here: Polypropylene MSDS

But let me summarize it for you for what you might like to know.

The melting point is 174 degrees C, which is about 345 degrees F. And it has a flash point around 300 deg C (572 deg F). If you heat it past its melting temperature, I am sure you won't be able to use it as a mug anymore. It would likely begin to melt before you reach that temperature, but in any case, it is very unlikely for anyone to actually push the mug to its flash point, which is the temperature at which it may spontaneous combust. This will degrade the material and make it potentially toxic.

But since our water boils at 100 deg C (212 deg F), with slight variations based on the ion contents of the water and elevation at which you are boiling water, it is unlikely that your beverage can reach this temperature. There are a couple of scenarios that I can think of where this might happen, ie, if you boil your coffee in a pressure cooker, but that just sounds silly.

Conclusion based on the melting point of the plastics: it shouldn't be a concern based on immediate temperature effects.

Even though the MSDS lists that it has no known chronic health adverse effects and that most skin contact is negligible in terms of health risks, I wouldn't want to be drinking hot things out of a plastic mug everyday. I migrated to stainless steel/ceramic/Pyrex for my materials of choice for hot-beverage vehicles.

Under the health risk category, there is an item listed for fine dust of this material and it may cause eye irritation and that you ought to avoid inhaling it. So if you purchased some of these, make sure that you wash them really good before using it, in case there are any fine particles left over from the manufacturing processes.

I have to point out that if the product undergoes thermal degradation, its byproducts will be simple hydrocarbon chemicals such as methane and ethane, propane, etc, but the list also includes carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide Acute exposure to these chemicals may give you symptoms including headache, nausea, irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract.

I do not know what temperature that the material may begin to degrade, but I will just say that I am done with drinking out of plastic for my hot drinks...

mommatoclaire


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mommatoclaire
Pupator wrote:Source?



Try www.Mercola.com

1wally1


quality posts: 1 Private Messages 1wally1
bkd69 wrote:YES! Now I can play Edward Coffeehands!



that is so funny....made my whole day.

reservoird


quality posts: 4 Private Messages reservoird
highnote wrote:In general, the longest consumer commute time is in the NY area and is 45 minutes.



BWAAAAAAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!

uthro


quality posts: 0 Private Messages uthro

We have these mugs, they are rugged and do a great job. One thing to consider though,... they fit the cupholders in my Camry but they dont fit the ones in my wife's Impala so make sure your cupholders have the room for them.

reservoird


quality posts: 4 Private Messages reservoird
aball30 wrote:Outside sticker says "Built for Life" but at the bottom it says "5 year warranty". If I purchase this, will I have 5 years or less to live?



aball30 FTW!

reservoird


quality posts: 4 Private Messages reservoird
michoutdoors wrote:WAS a good name when they were built here. Made in the Good Ol' Chicom Republic these days. No thanks, Woot.



It appears my i-whatchamacallit was made in the "Good Ol' Chicom Republic." Works pretty well.

[For the record, my computer informed me that "i-whachamcallit" is not a word, but "i-whatchamacallit" is.]

starbux4me


quality posts: 0 Private Messages starbux4me

is it made in USA?

TBIRDLVR


quality posts: 2 Private Messages TBIRDLVR
daisyterp wrote:Even BPA free plastic makes me nervous. BPA free doesn't not mean it's totally safe from leaching chemicals- especially when used for hot beverages.
We have 3 totally stainless travel mugs, always looking for another 1 or 2 though since they get left in the car, dishwasher, etc. Sad that this isn't totally stainless.



Wrong.

cryfordawn


quality posts: 1 Private Messages cryfordawn
mommatoclaire wrote:Try www.Mercola.com



How about a source that isn't trying to sell you their "healthier" (quotes because after a scan of this page he has absolutely NO evidence to back up any claims about his products, just some vague references to supposed health risks and scare tactics) and more expensive alternatives?

Ninkumpoop


quality posts: 27 Private Messages Ninkumpoop

Yes, be scared, be very scared of polypropylene.

And don't forget to be scared of the radioactive heavy metals in your stainless steel mug and the lead paint on your ceramic/glass mugs. I almost forgot the metallic dust from the metal finishing and the bone ash in the white coffee mug.

I guess my point is that you need to take a look at all options before discounting one option as the worst, especially on the basis of a very generic MSDS.

yuqimao wrote:Since we now know these mugs are made from Polypropylene, I have been reading the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for this chemical here: Polypropylene MSDS

But let me summarize it for you for what you might like to know.

The melting point is 174 degrees C, which is about 345 degrees F. And it has a flash point around 300 deg C (572 deg F). If you heat it past its melting temperature, I am sure you won't be able to use it as a mug anymore. It would likely begin to melt before you reach that temperature, but in any case, it is very unlikely for anyone to actually push the mug to its flash point, which is the temperature at which it may spontaneous combust. This will degrade the material and make it potentially toxic.

But since our water boils at 100 deg C (212 deg F), with slight variations based on the ion contents of the water and elevation at which you are boiling water, it is unlikely that your beverage can reach this temperature. There are a couple of scenarios that I can think of where this might happen, ie, if you boil your coffee in a pressure cooker, but that just sounds silly.

Conclusion based on the melting point of the plastics: it shouldn't be a concern based on immediate temperature effects.

Even though the MSDS lists that it has no known chronic health adverse effects and that most skin contact is negligible in terms of health risks, I wouldn't want to be drinking hot things out of a plastic mug everyday. I migrated to stainless steel/ceramic/Pyrex for my materials of choice for hot-beverage vehicles.

Under the health risk category, there is an item listed for fine dust of this material and it may cause eye irritation and that you ought to avoid inhaling it. So if you purchased some of these, make sure that you wash them really good before using it, in case there are any fine particles left over from the manufacturing processes.

I have to point out that if the product undergoes thermal degradation, its byproducts will be simple hydrocarbon chemicals such as methane and ethane, propane, etc, but the list also includes carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide Acute exposure to these chemicals may give you symptoms including headache, nausea, irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract.

I do not know what temperature that the material may begin to degrade, but I will just say that I am done with drinking out of plastic for my hot drinks...



twootwoot


quality posts: 0 Private Messages twootwoot

Alright! Now I can drive to work and have a clean-non-coffee stained shirt! Promotion, here I come.

dnpapad


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dnpapad

Put the stainless steel on the inside and the plastic on the outside.

bfaller


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bfaller

Anyone know if this or any part of it is made in China?