WootBot


quality posts: 15 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Poll: Vinyl records are…
  • 16.9% - Literally the best quality sound format the world has ever invented, the end. 297
  • 18.6% - Always look cool and are fun to watch spinning. 328
  • 2.2% - Precious gems in which I’ve invested my life savings. Don’t play them! 39
  • 21.3% - Sort of outdated, but the music can be nice. 375
  • 14.1% - A relic of an ancient time. Or possibly for club DJs. 248
  • 27% - Only for hipsters. That’s right, I said it. 475
1762 votes

Well, how do you fare compared to the Zeitgeist? Chat up your fellow wooters and let us know how lame this poll was or what obvious choices we missed. For example: Was this poll a) STUPID, b) DUMB, c) POINTLESS or d) ALL OF THE ABOVE?

bogus


quality posts: 11 Private Messages bogus

Vinyl is nice if you've got a $2000 audio system (I don't) or want access to old stuff with sporadic availability (I sometimes do, especially since I only buy used music).

And, yeah, it looks a lot cooler than a CD or MP3 player. Moving parts, yo.

epicsatyr


quality posts: 0 Private Messages epicsatyr

Can't forget how far we have come. Kinda like that says "Those who don't learn from history are doomed to repeat it"......get rid of vinyl, and we have to suffer through the 60's again

fghtinrishnvrdie


quality posts: 1 Private Messages fghtinrishnvrdie

Anybody dissing on vinyl hasn't heard a Waylon record spinning.

I bought:
Logitech Bluetooth headphones
San Disk 512mb MP3 & WMA Player
Bellsouth 10 Mile FRS/GMRS 2 Way Radios
Nexxtech 7" 16:9 LCD Portable DVD Player
Jepson Winery Mendocino Mix

michaeldigital


quality posts: 0 Private Messages michaeldigital

If you have the right equipment vinyl sound is by far the best. Most people have never heard vinyl on the proper equipment, so they judge it from their $200 Sony system.

RWoodward


quality posts: 58 Private Messages RWoodward

As with analog television and rotary telephones, you can argue their superior aspects until you're blue in the face, but it's still a technology who's time has passed.

gravityisweak


quality posts: 27 Private Messages gravityisweak

Considering you can only listen to vinyl in the same location as your massive stereo setup and wherever the records are stored.

I still want to listen to music in my car, while i walk, while I bike, etc. I also don't want to pay for the same music multiple times. Which means I would have to find a way to rip vinyl into mp3 format.

On top of that, how many people notice the difference between a high quality mp3 and vinyl? If you do, its marginal at best.

All that being said, are people really trying to justify a small improvement in quality for a MASSIVELY less convenient listening experience?

If you like that sort of thing, to each his own. I'll stick with my mp3s.

danagin


quality posts: 0 Private Messages danagin

To me, in a digital age where I could give a crap less about CDs, and digital downloads give you nothing tangible. I like Vinyl records.
It gives me something to hold.
It gives me album art.
It gives me something that may one day be worth something more due to the limited availablity.
In other words it gives me a reason to buy an entire album from an artist that I want to support more than just buying a few singles from the albums online. A plastic CD jewel case is just not as appealing as a Vinyl slip and the sound is not based off of 1s and 0s. It's analog, there's just something a little more wholsome about that to me.
As others mentioned, not many people have the right equipment to fully appreciate the sound quality, myself included.
Do away with CDs, bring back Vinyl so fans have something more worth their money and give digital downloads for all tracks on the album with the vinyl. Then I will start buying albums again, rather than single songs.

richmondcontingent


quality posts: 0 Private Messages richmondcontingent
gravityisweak wrote:
On top of that, how many people notice the difference between a high quality mp3 and vinyl? If you do, its marginal at best.



Actually, I suspect that with a properly configured A/B test, even you could hear a significant difference in sound quality between an LP and an mp3 (yes, even one ripped at 320). Simply put, one is compressed and the other isn't. That means there's a lot more dynamic range (an absence of "sonic squashing", shall we say) in the LP version. In addition to allowing for the full frequency range to be reproduced, it should also sound more natural -- so you don't need "golden ears" to hear the difference.

I get your basic point -- I understand that the portability of mp3s makes them a lot more convenient. That's why I think they're fine for the car. But if I have the system to do it justice, I'll take the LP 10 out of 10 times, even if it means I have to find space to store that vinyl, because the difference in sound quality is exponentially greater than "marginal".

olcubmaster


quality posts: 30 Private Messages olcubmaster
richmondcontingent wrote:Actually, I suspect that with a properly configured A/B test, even you could hear a significant difference in sound quality between an LP and an mp3 (yes, even one ripped at 320). Simply put, one is compressed and the other isn't. That means there's a lot more dynamic range (an absence of "sonic squashing", shall we say) in the LP version. In addition to allowing for the full frequency range to be reproduced, it should also sound more natural -- so you don't need "golden ears" to hear the difference.

I get your basic point -- I understand that the portability of mp3s makes them a lot more convenient. That's why I think they're fine for the car. But if I have the system to do it justice, I'll take the LP 10 out of 10 times, even if it means I have to find space to store that vinyl, because the difference in sound quality is exponentially greater than "marginal".



You are correct in noting the difference in compression between mp3 & vinyl. However, even vinyl recordings are compressed.

There are mechanical limitations as to what the stylus can track.

Early vinyl was compressed to sound better on AM radio. Later that was loosened up as FM took over in popularity.

Direct to Disk and half speed remastered records later offered an improvement for home listening, but they were blown out of the water by the potential dynamic range of a digitally mastered CD.

It was during that transition from CD to MP3 that things got squished.

Sugar 'em up and send 'em home

dipdac


quality posts: 3 Private Messages dipdac
richmondcontingent wrote:Actually, I suspect that with a properly configured A/B test, even you could hear a significant difference in sound quality between an LP and an mp3 (yes, even one ripped at 320). Simply put, one is compressed and the other isn't. That means there's a lot more dynamic range (an absence of "sonic squashing", shall we say) in the LP version. In addition to allowing for the full frequency range to be reproduced, it should also sound more natural -- so you don't need "golden ears" to hear the difference.

I get your basic point -- I understand that the portability of mp3s makes them a lot more convenient. That's why I think they're fine for the car. But if I have the system to do it justice, I'll take the LP 10 out of 10 times, even if it means I have to find space to store that vinyl, because the difference in sound quality is exponentially greater than "marginal".



Well....

The sound isn't compressed *because it's an MP3, it's compressed because in this day and age we have what's been labeled the 'loudness war.'

Around the time people started listening to music in their cars, people noticed that the quiet parts are hard to hear over the engine and road noise and stuff like that, to eventually radio stations got savvy and put compressors on the music they played. That seems to be when it started. Eventually, studios started cutting albums that some compressed already (sometimes you can get a car version of the album separate from the original, but usually most people only get access to the car version).

At some point they figured out loudness = money and made recordings louder and louder. The goriest part of this phenomenon occurred in the early '00s, when a few big-name bands, like Metallica, for instance, put out a CD that was so loud it clipped every CD player it was put in. Yes, that happened.

Vinyl does have the distinction of being the least reactive medium for music. That means a vinyl record will last way longer than a cd or tape if stored properly. That's why the library of congress is putting everything it's got on vinyl, to preserve it.

All this info I learned in music school.

phd4life


quality posts: 0 Private Messages phd4life
gravityisweak wrote:Considering you can only listen to vinyl in the same location as your massive stereo setup and wherever the records are stored.

I still want to listen to music in my car, while i walk, while I bike, etc. I also don't want to pay for the same music multiple times. Which means I would have to find a way to rip vinyl into mp3 format.

On top of that, how many people notice the difference between a high quality mp3 and vinyl? If you do, its marginal at best.

All that being said, are people really trying to justify a small improvement in quality for a MASSIVELY less convenient listening experience?

If you like that sort of thing, to each his own. I'll stick with my mp3s.



If you have a USB turntable, you can put the records into MP3 format like I do, and the sound is much better than CDs, which lose some of the detail vinyl has due to the digitization of the sound.

G$

Slydon


quality posts: 18 Private Messages Slydon

Staff

danagin wrote:and the sound is not based off of 1s and 0s.



I'm a big fan of records and I prefer to buy vinyl but the truth is, if you're buying anything made this century, it's probably passed though 1's and 0's at some point in the chain.

Hi, I'm one of the writers. My powers are limited but I'll do what I can.

ekarlw


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ekarlw

Unfortunately there are now two generations who have never heard and thus don't know what truly good music reproduction is all about - when the world settled for convenience over quality a great treasure was lost.

The simple reality is:

Vinyl is an analog format and humans are analog. Digital is an 'altered' format where the low, high 'inaudible' ranges are omitted but in the analog world those are the frequencies you feel (hence why MP3's sound flat, lifeless and have no depth.

With that said digital being an imperfect format makes it ideal for imperfect listening conditions such as cars, jogging, etc.

They both have a place but only vinyl allows the total experience.

cander111


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cander111

Cool and all that. Analog sound from a record CAN be nirvana IF
1. The record was recorded and pressed well, which mass marketed music isn't
2. The first or second time played, as the vinyl wears out
3. The equipment is properly designed.
4. Hum, noise is controlled in the entire audio chain.

In other words, spend a LOT of money, buy VERY EXPENSIVE high end records, and you can enjoy for a brief time.

Suggestion- Buy a $50 class T amp, digital songs at a decent bit rate. Take the rest of your $1000 and buy a set of used Klipsch horn speakers. Or, and a decent bottle of Scotch.

cander111


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cander111


"Vinyl does have the distinction of being the least reactive medium for music. That means a vinyl record will last way longer than a cd or tape if stored properly. "

Unfortunately, a needle rides in the groove a the (relatively) soft vinyl record. It wears it out. Records sound good for the first few plays, then it is all downhill.

BTW, nearly all music is recorded with some for of expansion-compression regardless of media. You can buy very expensive all analog direct to vinyl recordings but they tend to be Jazz and generally obscure musicians.

dipdac


quality posts: 3 Private Messages dipdac
Slydon wrote:if you're buying anything made this century, it's probably passed though 1's and 0's at some point in the chain.



That's because digital recording techniques are so much easier and more efficient than tape and scissors.

echobase46


quality posts: 0 Private Messages echobase46
cander111 wrote:Unfortunately, a needle rides in the groove a the (relatively) soft vinyl record. It wears it out. Records sound good for the first few plays, then it is all downhill.



Maybe, but you've got to be awfully picky to truly notice any defect to the sound after just a few plays. I've got a great system, and love my record collection, and actually play them all the time… they still sound pretty awesome to me.

http://www.recordvision.com

tooter1952


quality posts: 2 Private Messages tooter1952

Things you can do with a record player: 1)Play it at different speeds. 2)Hold your finger on it and make it sound weird. 3)Put the tonearm on the other side of the record to make it play backwards. 4)Set the counterweight to 0 so it plays random bits as it skips around! 5)Put the cat on it until he gets dizzy. 6)Tell your brother his music sucks and use his LP as a Frisbee!

abitterwoman


quality posts: 27 Private Messages abitterwoman

I loved records. My favorite is one I have by Louis Jordan with "Don't Send Me Flowers When I'm in the Graveyard" and "Point of No Return on it." I just recently bought a record to mp3 converter because I couldn't find it online and it would be nice to have portability (even though I prefer it on the record player).

Dig it. (My apologies-The quality is not perfect because the record isn't in perfect condition.)


"Computers don't make errors. What they do, they do on purpose."

Slydon


quality posts: 18 Private Messages Slydon

Staff

abitterwoman wrote:I loved records. My favorite is one I have by Louis Jordan with "Don't Send Me Flowers When I'm in the Graveyard" and "Point of No Return" on it.



I liked that!

Hi, I'm one of the writers. My powers are limited but I'll do what I can.

abitterwoman


quality posts: 27 Private Messages abitterwoman
Slydon wrote:I liked that!



That's good to hear I kept wondering why no one had it available online, as I've always thought some people might enjoy it.

"Computers don't make errors. What they do, they do on purpose."

echobase46


quality posts: 0 Private Messages echobase46

Lots of great comments here!! Fun conversation

Please visit my site if you're looking for used and new vinyl records. We also have a blog about various albums...comments welcome

http://www.recordvision.com/