hotrod4x5


quality posts: 4 Private Messages hotrod4x5

Why aren't the telling us the inches on these? Is the 3 quart 13x9?

maxmillertime


quality posts: 0 Private Messages maxmillertime

Actually this isn't exactly accurate about when the composition changed to soda lime.
World Kitchen did not change the product composition for Pyrex glass bakeware.
Pyrex glass bakeware has been made – first by Corning Incorporated and now by World Kitchen – using the same soda lime composition and heat-strengthening process for more than 60 years.
World Kitchen has always manufactured Pyrex glass bakeware in the U.S. and our packaging proudly displays the American flag and the “made in the USA” label.
World Kitchen, which purchased the Pyrex consumer products business from Corning Incorporated in 1998, is a U.S. company based in Rosemont, Illinois.
Read the rest at:
http://www.pyrexware.com/index.asp?pageId=30

sdc100 wrote:In 1998, Corning Glass sold their Pyrex division to World Kitchens in the US, and Newell Cookware in Europe. Newell continued using borosilicate glass while World Kitchen switched to cheaper soda-lime glass. You can detect soda-lime glass by its green-blue tinged edges. Borosilicate is completely colorless.

After many complaints of cracking from temperature changes, Consumer Reports determined that the original borosilicate formula was indeed more resistant to temeperature changes, i.e. from the oven to the cool counter. The American glass has exploded from such abrupt changes causing injuries. World Kitchen, however, claims that soda-lime is not only cheaper, but also more resistant to breakage when dropped.

Assuming that this is American Pyrex, it would be soda-lime.

Note the soda-lime greenish tinge in the left Pyrex cup made by World Kitchen in the US. The right cup uses Corning's original borosilicate.


sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
maxmillertime wrote:Actually this isn't exactly accurate about when the composition changed to soda lime.
World Kitchen did not change the product composition for Pyrex glass bakeware.
Pyrex glass bakeware has been made – first by Corning Incorporated and now by World Kitchen – using the same soda lime composition and heat-strengthening process for more than 60 years.
World Kitchen has always manufactured Pyrex glass bakeware in the U.S. and our packaging proudly displays the American flag and the “made in the USA” label.
World Kitchen, which purchased the Pyrex consumer products business from Corning Incorporated in 1998, is a U.S. company based in Rosemont, Illinois.
Read the rest at:
http://www.pyrexware.com/index.asp?pageId=30



This simply isn't true. While Corning may have made some Pyrex out of soda-lime prior to its sale to World Kitchens, it also used its original borosilica formula, even in the 1990's. As proof, I have Corning made Pyrex from that period which is borosilica. Since I also have World Kitchen Pyrex, I can see the difference. The characteristic green tinge is only in the World Kitchen ware. I've also seen European Pyrex as well as borosilicate glassware from other companies like Lock & Lock. Only World Kitchen as the soda-lime tint.

The point at which Corning stopped using borosilica has never been established. Even Corning has been vague about it. The fact that I have Corning-made borosilica Pyrex from the 1990s proves you wrong. They most certainly did not stop using borosilica 60 years ago.

AS for made-in-the-US, no one ever disputed where World Kitchen is located. The question is whether World Kitchen's soda-lime is better or the same as the original borosilicate glass. Consumer Reports and the experience of many longtime users say that the new glass is worse. Sorry, I am patriotic, but I also care about safety and convenience.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100

Those who want glassware made of borosilicate glass, but have no access to European Pyrex, can simply buy Lock & Lock's glass containers. Woot sells them all the time. As a Korean company, their suppliers are Asian, and apparently Asians still use borosilicate glass. I have not baked with my Lock & Lock glassware but they do say oven-safe. I actually prefer Lock & Lock's ceramic containers, which are lighter, more attractive and more heat-resistant than glass (especially American Pyrex's soda-lime glass). I also find them easier to clean. They're the containers I use daily, for microwaving as well as baking.

Lock & Lock Boroseal


Lock & Lock Ceramic containers

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
wooters!! wrote:I have one marked Microwaveable, Made in USA, Corning and shows no coloration tinge-
How often does a measuring cup go into the oven anyway? Do people commonly use it for cooking?



Some Pyrex measuring cups are large and wide enough to make an effective cooking container. The most common use is to melt and briefly cook ingredients, whether in a microwave, over boiling water or in an oven. BUt you can certainly mix a souffle in a wide Pyrex measuring cup and then bake it in the same container.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
Wiredog wrote:The liquid in the bottom helps with cleaning. If you don't the first juices/grease from the meat will bake on hard.



Interesting. I simply spray my cookware, whether glass or metal, with non-stick cooking spray before baking.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
maxmillertime wrote:Actually this isn't exactly accurate about when the composition changed to soda lime.
World Kitchen did not change the product composition for Pyrex glass bakeware.
Pyrex glass bakeware has been made – first by Corning Incorporated and now by World Kitchen – using the same soda lime composition and heat-strengthening process for more than 60 years.
World Kitchen has always manufactured Pyrex glass bakeware in the U.S. and our packaging proudly displays the American flag and the “made in the USA” label.
World Kitchen, which purchased the Pyrex consumer products business from Corning Incorporated in 1998, is a U.S. company based in Rosemont, Illinois.
Read the rest at:
http://www.pyrexware.com/index.asp?pageId=30



You're being dishonest, as is that World Kitchen webpage. It presents findings favorable to the company, but ignores facts that are not. For example, it correctly states that the he U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission found US Pyre safe to use. Yet it doesn't address the undeniable fact that the European borosilicate glass is more resistant to heat changes. When World Kitchen claims that soda-lime glass is more resistant to breakage, don't you think it should also mention the downsides? Indeed, we buy Pyrex for heat-resistance, not for impact-resistance. Even Pyrex's name means heat. So don't you think the webpage should admit that there really is a difference?

Most damning, the very Snopes article that World Kitchen claims support it actually says something else. The company insists that Corning and World Kitchen has used soda-lime glass for 60+ years. The ONLY support for that claim in the Snopes article is a statement from World Kitchen itself! And to a lesser extent, Anchor Hocking's claim that borosilica was phased out in the US by the 1980's. Note, however, that both Anchor and World Kitchen benefit from this claim so their statement isn't objective. What World's webpage ignores is an OFFICIAL STATEMENT FROM CORNING, who has nothing to gain or lose since they no longer own Pyrex.

From Snopes, which World Kitchen cites:

"Sarah Horvath, a Corning spokeswoman, says Corning made Pyrex out of both soda lime and borosilicate at several locations before selling the U.S. business to World Kitchen in 1998, but provided no more details. P. Bruce Adams, formerly an executive scientist at Corning, says that borosilicate was still being used to make Pyrex when he retired in 1987.



Both Corning's official spokesperson and a Corning scientist EXPLICITLY contradict World Kitchen's claim that Corning had switched to soda-lime 60+ years ago!!! The spokesperson even said that they were still using borosilicate at the point of sale in 1998. Why didn't World mention that on their website???

While World Kitchen may not have changed the formulation, and merely discontinued the use of borosilicate, the fact remains: World Kitchen's actions made a thermally-safer glass unavailable to Americans. And that's what this debate is about, isn't it?

For reference, here are the websites in question:

World Kitchen's Official Page on the Pyrex "myth"

The Snopes article World Kitchen claims as support. Yet, it clearly indicates that Corning was still using borosilicate when it sold Pyrex in 1998.

johnjshug


quality posts: 0 Private Messages johnjshug

Hey guys,

My first woot purchase. I just got my Pyrex 9 piece set and one of the containers is shattered. The FAQ says in cases of defective products to contact the manufacturer who can usually replace but since it was broken, should I try to go through woot? If anyone could give me some advice as to whom to contact, I would appreciate it.

ROGETRAY


quality posts: 158 Private Messages ROGETRAY

Staff

johnjshug wrote:Hey guys,

My first woot purchase. I just got my Pyrex 9 piece set and one of the containers is shattered. The FAQ says in cases of defective products to contact the manufacturer who can usually replace but since it was broken, should I try to go through woot? If anyone could give me some advice as to whom to contact, I would appreciate it.



Sorry for the late reply, I seemed to have missed your message during the day :/

Please email us at service@woot.com and we'll be glad to help you out with your order. Remember to include your username and order number so we can assist you in a timely manner

Sincerely,
Woot Staff