bakerb316


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bakerb316

Bought some of these from a discount store a while ago. Expiration date in 2014 - 2015 range (if I remember correctly). Thought that some of them were dead because they "didn't work" in my kids toys. Checked them with a battery checker and they were actually reverse polarized (positive where the negative was supposed to be and vice verse)! Buyer beware!

Since 2008 w00t has taken me for $1127.75.

cengland0


quality posts: 11 Private Messages cengland0
chipmunkofdoom2 wrote:Math time:

100 AA batteries: $23 (shipped)
Cost per battery: $0.23

Quality battery charger (Lacrosse series, for example): $40 (Amazon Prime)
4x AA Rechargeables: $10 (give or take)

Let's say that you can get 100 charges out of a single battery. Many manufacturers say you can get 1000, but I often find that's BS. I don't know a true number but we'll low-ball to illustrate a point and say you'll only get 10% of that. So let's assume you'll get 100 charges per battery. So, you are getting 400 uses (ostensibly batteries) for $50. (You will get more, but again, just for demonstration..)

Cost per battery: $0.13.

I haven't bought batteries in almost 3 years. The next time I do, I'm sure the batteries I buy will last the same amount of time. Plus, since I already have my great Lacrosse charger, my cost per battery will be even lower now that I don't have that initial investment to subsidize. Rechargeable all the way.



Your math may be correct but you didn't account for a couple other factors:

1. Cost of electricity to charge the batteries.
2. Inconvenience factor to have to wait for the charge cycle to complete.
3. Regular batteries have been engineered to have a low-toxicity so they can be thrown away and put into the landfill. Rechargeable Nicads have cadmium, and NiMh are less toxic than Nicads, but it is still recommended that they be recycled instead of thrown away.
4. The shelf-life of a rechargeable is horrible. Put one in a clock that requires a AA battery and it will be dead in 30 days but an Alkaline will last about a year.
5. The voltage is only 1.2V (or 1.25) for rechargeable and 1.5 for regular. This voltage difference can cause some devices to not function -- especially when they require 8 of them to make 12 volts. For example, there are some 5W Walkie-Talkies that require 10 rechargeable or 8 Alkaline and then you insert dummy batteries to take up the rest of the space.
6. When you have several rechargeable batteries and some go bad, it's hard to tell if the battery needs charging or is dead and needs replacing. So after sorting through a bucket of Alkaline batteries, I can test them and if they are low in energy, I throw them away. If I test a rechargeable and it shows bad, do I throw it away or charge it -- I find myself charging up dead batteries only to find it's still not charged and I don't notice until the device doesn't work and I then get frustrated.

I'm sure there's more I could add but I've already typed enough for now.

cengland0


quality posts: 11 Private Messages cengland0
bakerb316 wrote:Bought some of these from a discount store a while ago. Expiration date in 2014 - 2015 range (if I remember correctly). Thought that some of them were dead because they "didn't work" in my kids toys. Checked them with a battery checker and they were actually reverse polarized (positive where the negative was supposed to be and vice verse)! Buyer beware!



The battery was probably reverse charged while it was in the toy. Since it discharged before the other batteries, it was reverse charged by the other batteries.

This is a common problem when batteries are not properly matched or when you put one battery in backwards.

When using multiple batteries they should have the same amount of charge. Otherwise one will go dead before the others and it can be reverse charged by the other battery (when connected in series).

Since these are not rechargeable batteries, you're lucky it didn't activate the safety vent leading to alkaline electrolyte leakage destroying the battery compartment.

xtreemsaver


quality posts: 2 Private Messages xtreemsaver

This doesnt seem like a very good deal.

0ldeag1e


quality posts: 0 Private Messages 0ldeag1e
cengland0 wrote:The issue about 6V lantern batteries containing 32 AA or 4 standards D-cells has been a hoax that was debunked by Snopes awhile ago. The lantern batteries do usually contain 4 individual cells wired in series but they are not of a standard size to be used by consumers.


http://www.snopes.com/photos/humor/batteryhack.asp



Just FYI, there are a variety of D-cell adaptors for 6-volt lantern battery-packs at Amazon - Rayovac makes 'em as does Lumilite (see http://www.amazon.com/Lumilite-4850-Krypton-Rubberized-Position/dp/B004S7YESK/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1352300108&sr=8-5&keywords=6v+d+cells) I think Coleman does too.

moschino25


quality posts: 0 Private Messages moschino25

Got these last time and they dont last as long as normal batteries but cant complain about the price.

vschweitzer


quality posts: 1 Private Messages vschweitzer

Hurricane Relief efforts in NY/NJ desperate for batteries as so many still living without power. Maybe WOOT could offer free shipping on donations or increase the max we can purchase - would like to send 3 packs to multiple org's.

stryper2000


quality posts: 28 Private Messages stryper2000
radi0j0hn wrote:You beat me to it! These are just cheap Chinese cells with a former big name branded on them. Dollar stores have them all the time with other former well-known names such as Sunbeam, etc.



also aren't most dollar store brand batteries of the "Heavy Duty" Variety, I know the one's at Dollar tree are usually those kind

The Craphound of Woot

Antagonist of Sellbuyer92 , I sniped his Basket Of Checkers

x38

CuzzinMerl


quality posts: 24 Private Messages CuzzinMerl
aotheoverlord wrote:What if I want 100 pack of AA and AAA?

(I have too many kids...)



I was in the check-out line at a grocery store when the lady asked me if I would like to make a donation to Children's Hospital. I told her, "Sure, I think I have a couple kids I could do without. When can I drop them off?"

MyronWooley


quality posts: 0 Private Messages MyronWooley

I bought a 100-pack of the very same batteries at Fry's Electronics. They are the worst batteries I have ever purchased. Some were DOA, the ones that did work died quickly, and because they have a propensity for leaking, I now have two ruined X-Box 360 wireless controllers and a custom, solid cherry office cabinet top with an electrolyte burn that goes through the finish and into the wood. About $750 to repair, with no recourse.

geo8rge


quality posts: 33 Private Messages geo8rge
pkphilip wrote:Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.

Why buy disposable batteries when you can get some decent rechargeable for a bit more?



As an experiment I tried them in a smoke detector and the detector did not detect the battery running low. I only discovered this by testing the smoke detector.


(Overall signature size was getting large. Recommended signature size is 5k.)

tpsully1


quality posts: 4 Private Messages tpsully1

How do these compare price/quality with Kirkland batteries?

Kimrod


quality posts: 2 Private Messages Kimrod

I bought a bunch of the AA and AAA on the last go-around and these batteries are terrible. They just suck.

For use in remotes at best; but even that was disappointing. I'll stick to the dollar store brands.

Kimrod


quality posts: 2 Private Messages Kimrod

Myron said, "I bought a 100-pack of the very same batteries at Fry's Electronics. They are the worst batteries I have ever purchased. Some were DOA, the ones that did work died quickly, and because they have a propensity for leaking, I now have two ruined X-Box 360 wireless controllers and a custom, solid cherry office cabinet top with an electrolyte burn that goes through the finish and into the wood. About $750 to repair, with no recourse."

I agree Myron, they totally suck and will never buy batteries on Woot again. Some deal. Bleah!

bradtheproducer


quality posts: 8 Private Messages bradtheproducer

The last time I bought a huge cheap pack of AA batteries from Woot, they all lasted a total of about 20 minutes in my Xbox controller before giving out.

inkycatz


quality posts: 105 Private Messages inkycatz
bradtheproducer wrote:The last time I bought a huge cheap pack of AA batteries from Woot, they all lasted a total of about 20 minutes in my Xbox controller before giving out.



I hope you contacted support@woot.com at the time!

I'm just hanging out, really.

whtthfgg


quality posts: 1 Private Messages whtthfgg

These typically go on a very good sale during black friday at various stores such as Farm and Fleet of Menards. They have been very good batteries, I buy them every year on BF

carlcampbelljr


quality posts: 1 Private Messages carlcampbelljr
glubash wrote:Much worse deal here:

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Duracell-Duracell-Duracell-Duracell-Alkaline-Batteries-9-Volt-Alkaline-Duracellbattery-243-Mn1604Bkd-9-volt-alkaline-duracellbattery/21068444



But your comparing the cheap Chineese Alkalines that were made who knows when for a premium USA made battery.


gak0090


quality posts: 78 Private Messages gak0090
cengland0 wrote:Your math may be correct but you didn't account for a couple other factors:

1. Cost of electricity to charge the batteries.
2. Inconvenience factor to have to wait for the charge cycle to complete.
3. Regular batteries have been engineered to have a low-toxicity so they can be thrown away and put into the landfill. Rechargeable Nicads have cadmium, and NiMh are less toxic than Nicads, but it is still recommended that they be recycled instead of thrown away.
4. The shelf-life of a rechargeable is horrible. Put one in a clock that requires a AA battery and it will be dead in 30 days but an Alkaline will last about a year.
5. The voltage is only 1.2V (or 1.25) for rechargeable and 1.5 for regular. This voltage difference can cause some devices to not function -- especially when they require 8 of them to make 12 volts. For example, there are some 5W Walkie-Talkies that require 10 rechargeable or 8 Alkaline and then you insert dummy batteries to take up the rest of the space.
6. When you have several rechargeable batteries and some go bad, it's hard to tell if the battery needs charging or is dead and needs replacing. So after sorting through a bucket of Alkaline batteries, I can test them and if they are low in energy, I throw them away. If I test a rechargeable and it shows bad, do I throw it away or charge it -- I find myself charging up dead batteries only to find it's still not charged and I don't notice until the device doesn't work and I then get frustrated.

I'm sure there's more I could add but I've already typed enough for now.




You brought up a lot of great points about not using rechargeables- the only one you left out , is that it is a major pain in the:



Yeah - I get it, I'm not green...but until rechargeables can recharge themselves without any intervention from me- they are no go.

spenv137


quality posts: 0 Private Messages spenv137
nvgeologist wrote:You predicted a Romney landslide, didn't you?



You made me spit my drink out!
LOL

chipmunkofdoom2


quality posts: 0 Private Messages chipmunkofdoom2
cengland0 wrote:Your math may be correct but you didn't account for a couple other factors:

1. Cost of electricity to charge the batteries.
2. Inconvenience factor to have to wait for the charge cycle to complete.
3. Regular batteries have been engineered to have a low-toxicity so they can be thrown away and put into the landfill. Rechargeable Nicads have cadmium, and NiMh are less toxic than Nicads, but it is still recommended that they be recycled instead of thrown away.
4. The shelf-life of a rechargeable is horrible. Put one in a clock that requires a AA battery and it will be dead in 30 days but an Alkaline will last about a year.
5. The voltage is only 1.2V (or 1.25) for rechargeable and 1.5 for regular. This voltage difference can cause some devices to not function -- especially when they require 8 of them to make 12 volts. For example, there are some 5W Walkie-Talkies that require 10 rechargeable or 8 Alkaline and then you insert dummy batteries to take up the rest of the space.
6. When you have several rechargeable batteries and some go bad, it's hard to tell if the battery needs charging or is dead and needs replacing. So after sorting through a bucket of Alkaline batteries, I can test them and if they are low in energy, I throw them away. If I test a rechargeable and it shows bad, do I throw it away or charge it -- I find myself charging up dead batteries only to find it's still not charged and I don't notice until the device doesn't work and I then get frustrated.

I'm sure there's more I could add but I've already typed enough for now.



1. Wattage = Voltage x Amps.. so a rechargeable AA battery at 1.25v and 2000mAh would take 2.5W to charge (we'll round off to 3 for inefficiency). I don't know how much you pay for a kWh, but for me that's less than a drop in the bucket.
2. Buy quality, low self-discharge batteries and have extras on hand?
3. Okay.. after 3 years you can go to your local municipality to recycle? Plus, if you get 100 charges out of a rechargeable, you will have thrown away 100 regular batteries for that one rechargeable you have to recycle. Doesn't seem like even close to being even. Most rechargeable are NiMh now BTW.
4. See number two. Not sure what batteries you're using, but my AAs are almost all Sony CycleEnergys. After sitting in a drawer charged for what I would estimate a few months, I can pull them out and have normal use out of them.
5. Sorry, I shouldn't have said that rechargeable will work perfectly, just as well as regular batteries, with absolutely no caveats whatsoever. Oh wait, I didn't? I haven't had one application out of dozens that rechargeable didn't function just fine in.
6. See #2. If a rechargeable gets to the point where it's no good anymore, a smart charger (like the $40 Lacrosse model on Amazon) will tell you. Most of the time, if the battery won't hold a charge, the charger won't charge it.

It's fine if you don't like rechargeable batteries or are too lazy to pop them in a charger and keep spares around.. you're right, they're not suitable for every single application imaginable. Probably only 98% of products will work the exact same with rechargeable as they will with regular batteries. You are welcome to your own opinion, and I don't expect to convince you to buy rechargeable batteries, but a lot of your points as to why regular batteries are better seem to be misconceptions about how rechargeable work, or misconceptions based on inferior chargers or batteries. A quality charger with quality rechargeable will give you hundreds of cycles of use that in almost all cases will be comparable to standard batteries, and will be cheaper to boot.

Johnnys13


quality posts: 2 Private Messages Johnnys13

2018....can't wait till then.

Ringo4422


quality posts: 22 Private Messages Ringo4422

The 100 AA cell deal isn't bad, but it isn't a great deal for alkalines either.

Vizio 32” 720p LCD HDTV (2 of them), Seagate 750GB SATA/300 7200RPM Hard Drive, SiliconDust HDHomeRun Dual Digital HDTV Tuner, Kodak Theater HD Player, Acer Aspire One 10.1” Netbook, Philips Prestigo 8-Device Universal Remote, Asus Eee PC 900 Netbook with 1.6GHz Atom Processor, Philips Upconverting DVD Player with DivX and HDMI, Ashley Rock Axe Full Size Rockband and Guitar Hero Controller for PS2 and PS3, Philips Icon 5 Device Universal Remote, and a bunch of other carp.

PocketBrain


quality posts: 46 Private Messages PocketBrain
cengland0 wrote:The issue about 6V lantern batteries containing 32 AA or 4 standards D-cells has been a hoax that was debunked by Snopes awhile ago. The lantern batteries do usually contain 4 individual cells wired in series but they are not of a standard size to be used by consumers.


http://www.snopes.com/photos/humor/batteryhack.asp



Your snopes link shows the AA "hack" not the actually existant D-cells (or F cells) in the 6V lantern battery. Yes, I thought this video was funny when I first saw it, also the one where they showed over 1500 AA batteries coming out of a car battery. But D cells inside a 6V lantern battery is a known thing and real, so no need to go and correct the Wikipedia article on lantern batteries. This practice is a practical way of meeting the relatively small demand for 6V lantern cells without having to retool for the F cell size.

There's actually a disturbing number of YouTube videos of people cutting open lantern batteries to be disappointed by the D cells or F cells they found inside. Lots of them.

jobimoon


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jobimoon
brgh7dc wrote:I bought these a few months back and they came in the recloseable container.

They work great in the Wii-remotes. My kids go through batteries on those at an amazing pace.



Yes, they come in a recloseable container. I use these all the time.

ohlfahrt


quality posts: 2 Private Messages ohlfahrt

I won't buy another cheapo battery from any source; the Fujis I bought from Woot a while back are useable only in such low demand applications as mice and remotes.

FWIW, I did need quality AAs a couple of weeks ago. Went to Home Depot and got a top name brand in bulk at competitively fair price. And, I feel comfortable installing them in the emergency flashlights that I keep in the family cars.

fubart


quality posts: 1 Private Messages fubart

These batteries, which I have purchased before, are 100% crap. Even in my wireless mouse, they last about 4-5 days, tops. Crap. Free would be too expensive. C'mon, Woot, you can do better than this.

miken927


quality posts: 122 Private Messages miken927

(wrong brand, I know, but I can't resist...)


Knock it off, I dare you!


------------------
I Bet on Sky

dshoener


quality posts: 1 Private Messages dshoener

Wow, wish I had known that a few years ago...went on a trip out of the country and bought a few packs of the cheap ones at the dollar store for backup. Tried them all, none worked, Never even occurred to me they might have poles reversed.

bakerb316 wrote:Bought some of these from a discount store a while ago. Expiration date in 2014 - 2015 range (if I remember correctly). Thought that some of them were dead because they "didn't work" in my kids toys. Checked them with a battery checker and they were actually reverse polarized (positive where the negative was supposed to be and vice verse)! Buyer beware!



linningguo


quality posts: 0 Private Messages linningguo
jelliebaby wrote:I bought these on another woot sale. The pkg states they are
1.5 volts. Doesn't list the amp-hour rating on the pkg.



The typical mAh for AA alkaline is 2600mAh to 3000mAh.

linningguo


quality posts: 0 Private Messages linningguo
dshoener wrote:Wow, wish I had known that a few years ago...went on a trip out of the country and bought a few packs of the cheap ones at the dollar store for backup. Tried them all, none worked, Never even occurred to me they might have poles reversed.



I agree, most of dollar store batteries are not good because it's heavy duty, you will think "Heavy duty" is good one, not at all, it's much less performance than "Alkaline", more importantly, the "Heavy duty" don't work at digital camera or wii remote at all. Make sure to pick Alkaline.

whatsupchuck


quality posts: 0 Private Messages whatsupchuck

I have purchased these very batteries at a certain big box electronics store in the past, in large quantity. Never again. I'm in full agreement with those who say that these are cheap, low performing batteries. The Kodak batteries that Woot offered some time ago, OTOH, are working out well.

jobimoon


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jobimoon
fubart wrote:These batteries, which I have purchased before, are 100% crap. Even in my wireless mouse, they last about 4-5 days, tops. Crap. Free would be too expensive. C'mon, Woot, you can do better than this.



I bought these before. Check your mouse. I had my battery in my wireless mouse for at least 4 months and still going.

linningguo


quality posts: 0 Private Messages linningguo
dshoener wrote:Wow, wish I had known that a few years ago...went on a trip out of the country and bought a few packs of the cheap ones at the dollar store for backup. Tried them all, none worked, Never even occurred to me they might have poles reversed.



Pick fresh batteries! The "alkaline battery" should last long time, Duracell battery are "10 years" shelf life now, which means expired "2022", I won't buy expiration under "2018" alkaline batteries. But "Heavy duty battery" have much shorter shelf life, normally 3 years, anyway, not smart buy for "Heavy duty"


linningguo


quality posts: 0 Private Messages linningguo
bakerb316 wrote:Bought some of these from a discount store a while ago. Expiration date in 2014 - 2015 range (if I remember correctly). Thought that some of them were dead because they "didn't work" in my kids toys. Checked them with a battery checker and they were actually reverse polarized (positive where the negative was supposed to be and vice verse)! Buyer beware!



That's strange! Battery can't be reverse polarized, the top with cap is all way positive and bottom is negative, except 9V, have both positive and negative on top, never saw batteries like what you describe

aquaholik8


quality posts: 0 Private Messages aquaholik8

I agree, the last time I ordered 3 sets of batteries for my xbox, computer mouse and keyboard and they don't last long at all. I wish they did because it is a good deal for the amount of batteries that you receive.

zolof


quality posts: 0 Private Messages zolof

i tried to order batteies the last time . six months now and no batteries!! what up wit dat?

ROGETRAY


quality posts: 158 Private Messages ROGETRAY

Staff

zolof wrote:i tried to order batteies the last time . six months now and no batteries!! what up wit dat?



Have you reached us at support@woot.com? We can help resolve the issue if you haven't received your order yet.

Sincerely,
Woot Staff

D300


quality posts: 1 Private Messages D300

The Sanyo Eneloop batteries are great you can buy 8 to 12 of them for the cost of this deal//7 to 17$, I have some that are 5 years old, I use them in my Nikon SB 800s and this is a demanding job for them. Search Thomas + Sanyo Eneloop batteries, you will not regret it and you will do the environment a favor.

tonyzany23


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tonyzany23

Well, Amazon has three ratings on these AC Delco batteries that are 5 out of 5 stars and one review that gives them 3.5 stars! The description on these say they will last in storage till 2018! I've read about these brand on many websites that give them high praise for the price! As for any dollar store batteries I've ever boughten are usually old stock! Also it would be nice if people would give a review based on the brand offered, the battery size, and keep there social comments for Facebook!