tonyzany23


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tonyzany23

Maybe the slang word dat tells the whole story on your review!

ROGETRAY wrote:Have you reached us at support@woot.com? We can help resolve the issue if you haven't received your order yet.

Sincerely,
Woot Staff



chknchkr


quality posts: 4 Private Messages chknchkr

ChinaMart has Rayovac batteries two boxes of 48 AA or AAA for a total qty 96 for $23 with free shipping. Can get AA and AA, AAA and AAA or AA and AAA. I know that these work and price is not bad. Here's the link
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Rayovac-AA-or-AAA-Battery-Value-Bundle-2-Pack-of-48-count-with-optional-add-ons/21910230#rr

niter1dah


quality posts: 1 Private Messages niter1dah

These batteries don't seem to last very long but they're cheaaaap. Zerg rush all your AA needs!

Current damage total....

InFrom


quality posts: 32 Private Messages InFrom
vschweitzer wrote:Hurricane Relief efforts in NY/NJ desperate for batteries as so many still living without power. Maybe WOOT could offer free shipping on donations or increase the max we can purchase - would like to send 3 packs to multiple org's.



I bought 3 100-packs for just that reason -- my office has been actively collecting & delivering supplies to hard-hit neighborhoods, and coincidentally, just today a call went out for everyone to bring in packages of batteries to donate. This is an item we're hearing is desperately needed. This deal is going to save me and my colleagues a lot of individual trips to the store. Wish I could have bought more.

Don't forget that if Amazon charges sales tax in your state (as it does for shipments to NY), coupon code "taxsucks" gets you free Woot shipping if your purchase is at least $40.

After reading the comments, I hope they don't turn out to be lemons -- people from those neighborhoods are dealing with enough frustration already.

martinbogo


quality posts: 2 Private Messages martinbogo
whatsupchuck wrote:I have purchased these very batteries at a certain big box electronics store in the past, in large quantity. Never again. I'm in full agreement with those who say that these are cheap, low performing batteries. The Kodak batteries that Woot offered some time ago, OTOH, are working out well.



You know, you can call Fry's ... Fry's. It's not like you're going to hurt their feelings or anything.

That said, I *also* have purchased these batteries there, in the 50 pack. They always have about 2500mAh in them, and that's good enough for most of the devices and toys I have use of AA batteries for.

ACDelco batteries also come with a warranty people. If you get a bad batch, for any reason, they don't even ask you to ship the old batteries back. They just ship you a new set.. because it's not worth the postage for them to have you send the originals back.

CooperDude


quality posts: 10 Private Messages CooperDude
tpsully1 wrote:How do these compare price/quality with Kirkland batteries?



My wife used to work for Duracell and a fairly well known "secret" is that Kirkland batteries are simply Duracells with a different "jacket" on them. Duracell did this to keep Eveready from ever selling in Costco. Lots of other items are identical to the brand name for the same reason. ie. Ultra laundry detergent = Tide.

NewYork


quality posts: 1 Private Messages NewYork
cengland0 wrote:Your math may be correct but you didn't account for a couple other factors:

1. Cost of electricity to charge the batteries.
2. Inconvenience factor to have to wait for the charge cycle to complete.
3. Regular batteries have been engineered to have a low-toxicity so they can be thrown away and put into the landfill. Rechargeable Nicads have cadmium, and NiMh are less toxic than Nicads, but it is still recommended that they be recycled instead of thrown away.
4. The shelf-life of a rechargeable is horrible. Put one in a clock that requires a AA battery and it will be dead in 30 days but an Alkaline will last about a year.
5. The voltage is only 1.2V (or 1.25) for rechargeable and 1.5 for regular. This voltage difference can cause some devices to not function -- especially when they require 8 of them to make 12 volts. For example, there are some 5W Walkie-Talkies that require 10 rechargeable or 8 Alkaline and then you insert dummy batteries to take up the rest of the space.
6. When you have several rechargeable batteries and some go bad, it's hard to tell if the battery needs charging or is dead and needs replacing. So after sorting through a bucket of Alkaline batteries, I can test them and if they are low in energy, I throw them away. If I test a rechargeable and it shows bad, do I throw it away or charge it -- I find myself charging up dead batteries only to find it's still not charged and I don't notice until the device doesn't work and I then get frustrated.

I'm sure there's more I could add but I've already typed enough for now.



The iGo rechargeable alkalines produce a full 1.5 volts. I've been using them in my wireless mouse (Apple "Magic Mouse"), where they need to be swapped out every two weeks. They've paid for themselves several times over.

Available on Amazon, and occasioally they make an appearace on wOOt.

New York NY

lll0228


quality posts: 34 Private Messages lll0228
cengland0 wrote:Your math may be correct but you didn't account for a couple other factors:

1. Cost of electricity to charge the batteries.
2. Inconvenience factor to have to wait for the charge cycle to complete.
3. Regular batteries have been engineered to have a low-toxicity so they can be thrown away and put into the landfill. Rechargeable Nicads have cadmium, and NiMh are less toxic than Nicads, but it is still recommended that they be recycled instead of thrown away.
4. The shelf-life of a rechargeable is horrible. Put one in a clock that requires a AA battery and it will be dead in 30 days but an Alkaline will last about a year.
5. The voltage is only 1.2V (or 1.25) for rechargeable and 1.5 for regular. This voltage difference can cause some devices to not function -- especially when they require 8 of them to make 12 volts. For example, there are some 5W Walkie-Talkies that require 10 rechargeable or 8 Alkaline and then you insert dummy batteries to take up the rest of the space.
6. When you have several rechargeable batteries and some go bad, it's hard to tell if the battery needs charging or is dead and needs replacing. So after sorting through a bucket of Alkaline batteries, I can test them and if they are low in energy, I throw them away. If I test a rechargeable and it shows bad, do I throw it away or charge it -- I find myself charging up dead batteries only to find it's still not charged and I don't notice until the device doesn't work and I then get frustrated.

I'm sure there's more I could add but I've already typed enough for now.



Electrical Engineering faculty hat on.

Now, let me correct a few things. My doctorate was actually in energy storage, batteries specifically. And I would be specifically talking about the latest generation of NiMh batteries (like the Sanyo Eneloop).

1) The cost for charging a battery in terms of electricity is negligible, even over the lifetime of the batteries. In pennies.

2) Eneloops can be charged at high C (high capacity-current) with little to no degradation. Charging time can be as little as 30 minutes to reach over 80% of its capacity. Full charge can be as little as 2 hours. That's also negligible.

3) Low toxicity, in high quantity, becomes high toxicity. Alkaline batteries' chemistry is not very toxic any more, but it's also VERY stable and the half life is very long. Cumulative toxicity can become significant. When NiCad or NiMh are recycled, the materials are REUSED and do not leak into the environment in any form. And on top of that, there is a lot of waste with single-use batteries (packaging and the packaging of the battery cells itself). Those also go into landfill. Overall, I did some calculations, that Eneloops far surpass ANY single use batteries in environmental impact by over 100x.

4) The shelf-life for Eneloops is not horrible at all. And the time-dependent degradation is very low. After 3 years, 80+% of the capacity is left, AND the overall capacity has hardly diminished. The sitting, usable shelf-life for Eneloops is well over 5 years.

5) As for voltage, for low drain devices, your argument is very true. But most high drain applications would have a lot of ohmic drop for the alkaline batteries due to higher internal resistance. Eneloops' internal resistance is about 1/20th of an alkaline battery during high drain, making them to have identical terminal voltages. The only applications (low drain) that I would still recommend alkaline use would be something like a smoke detector, a clock etc. Those are low drain applications. Any toy with motors, any lighting, any communications related applications, rechargeables win by a very large margins. No contest in terms of cost and longevity.

6) If one invests ONCE is a La Crosse or any other slightly more advanced battery chargers (less than $50), all of them can detect "bad" or "unrecoverable" batteries. It takes less than 5 seconds to run that test.

In short, I highly recommend Eneloops (as of this moment in time). It is the most economical energy storage choice for consumer, it is the most green, it is also the most reliable and performs far better than alkaline in high drains applications. With a thorough calculation on cost and benefits, there is absolutely no contest. And Eneloops have been tested, by multiple independent institutes, that they can be recharged over 1000 times, and still retains 85%+ of its initial manufacturing capacity.

I hope this is helpful to many Wooters.

linningguo


quality posts: 0 Private Messages linningguo

This is strange thing! All batteries have top cap as positive and bottom as negative, except 9V and 6V, have both positive and negative in the top side. never see any batteries like you described.

jobimoon


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jobimoon
MyronWooley wrote:I bought a 100-pack of the very same batteries at Fry's Electronics. They are the worst batteries I have ever purchased. Some were DOA, the ones that did work died quickly, and because they have a propensity for leaking, I now have two ruined X-Box 360 wireless controllers and a custom, solid cherry office cabinet top with an electrolyte burn that goes through the finish and into the wood. About $750 to repair, with no recourse.



WOW! Most companies that I ever had an issue with made good if there was a product defect. Of course, you have to provide a legitimate reason there was no misuse on your part. I know my kids caused battery leakage trying to charge Alkaline batteries in their Wii charger. My fault cause the chargables were not holding up. Alkalines Not good on a charger a few days; had to buy two new Wii remotes. Oh well! Lesson Learned. Sorry for your loss.

amp23


quality posts: 0 Private Messages amp23

These were must needed after hurricane Sandy.

Amaury Piantini

lsrains99


quality posts: 1 Private Messages lsrains99

Hi, Could you please tell me how to access ACDelco for alkaline warranty assistance? I tried the primary company site, which seems to be all about car batteries. They said they could not help, I fussed, so they referred me to 800# (for auto-parts!) which does not answer. Purchased this brand elsewhere 6 months ago, for backup, that are already leaking. Woot took care of recent leaks. Thanks Woot! (We have Eneloops too of course.) Many thanks!

inkycatz


quality posts: 105 Private Messages inkycatz
lsrains99 wrote:Hi, Could you please tell me how to access ACDelco for alkaline warranty assistance? I tried the primary company site, which seems to be all about car batteries. They said they could not help, I fussed, so they referred me to 800# (for auto-parts!) which does not answer. Purchased this brand elsewhere 6 months ago, for backup, that are already leaking. Woot took care of recent leaks. Thanks Woot! (We have Eneloops too of course.) Many thanks!


Hey there!
Please feel free to contact support@woot.com for extra help here if you purchased any leaky batteries from us.

ps. That said, we're investigating to see what we can dig up in terms of AC Delco contact info for you.

I'm just hanging out, really.