WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Currie Technologies: Hybrid Electric Wheels

Biking is HARD. It takes energy. Sure, you could produce that energy with your muscles and calories and all that crap, but that just sounds like an awful lot of work. And to Currie Technologies. Currie's so against it, they built you a bike that runs on electricity. Name yours "Greased Lightning," and we take it back. No refunds.

mqstout


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mqstout

http://www.dmv.state.pa.us/registration/scooters.shtml

Sadly they don't appear to be able to be legal to use in the public in Pennsylvania.

inkycatz


quality posts: 105 Private Messages inkycatz

They do however, look fun. Anyone tried these?

I'm just hanging out, really.

shawnmfrench


quality posts: 0 Private Messages shawnmfrench
mqstout wrote:http://www.dmv.state.pa.us/registration/scooters.shtml

Sadly they don't appear to be able to be legal to use in the public in Pennsylvania.



Not so sure about that. This appears to be a "'Motorized pedalcycle.' A motor-driven cycle equipped with operable pedals, a motor rated no more than 1.5 brake horsepower, a cylinder capacity not exceeding 50 cubic centimeters, an automatic transmission, and a maximum design speed of no more than 25 miles per hour or an electric motor-driven cycle equipped with operable pedals and an automatic transmission powered by an electric battery or battery pack-powered electric motor with a maximum design speed of no more than 25 miles per hour." according to the code linked in the article. Oddly enough, there is no definition of "Motor Scooter."

mrtuba9


quality posts: 1 Private Messages mrtuba9

Though I don't own one, and have never ridden one, I'd suggest a helmet (unlike the rider in the photo)! Thinking of the terrain I'd ride it on (urban sidewalks & back roads), the undulating concrete and asphalt at 10-15mph seems like it might hurt when one of those little wheels gets caught in a crack or pothole.

60 woots, 102 items, 34x1, 7x2, 18x3 (3x3 ßÕÇ-now retired), 9 unique shirt.woot, 1 sellout.woot <--OUTDATED (except the martini ;')

woden501


quality posts: 0 Private Messages woden501

I researched this a few years ago, and found they were really not worth the trouble here in Ohio. In Ohio if they have pedals or the ability to attach pedals while remaining under certain speed and BHP capability limits they are legal to drive on the roads with a speed limit under 35mph as long as they are registered and insured. I think that was the jist of what I found out.

Now that's assuming that your local police force will even care about it. Technically bicycles aren't supposed to be used on pedestrian sidewalks at all around here, but you don't exactly see the cops pulling over every person riding their bike on the sidewalk.

cdubbya


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cdubbya

I've had the 500 model for about 2 months. Got it used for 200 which was a good deal. This one has more power, and goes further... itching... I could give the other to the wife... thinking...
It's legal here in california +
It's half off, I love half off +
It's almost 300 bucks -
It's more fun than a juicer!

Jixiar


quality posts: 4 Private Messages Jixiar

Regarding the EZ-TRZ Trailz Diamond Frame...caveat emptor!

The reviews on Amazon all seem to say "You get what you pay for", in a sliding scale of "It was cheap, but I'm happy for the price I paid," to "I'd never buy this again!"

LOTS of maintenance issues, warranty issues, broken parts, batteries not fully charging. Even when someone loves it, they still talk about the poor build quality and lack of battery life.

http://www.amazon.com/Currie-Technologies-Trailz-Electric-Bicycle/dp/B004QHG17O

gusvonpooch


quality posts: 24 Private Messages gusvonpooch

I saw the e-750 at Costco marked down to $219 last Friday. They were $269 so $50 off.Can't justify the cost but would love to try one for a few days.

tesla33


quality posts: 57 Private Messages tesla33
shawnmfrench wrote:Not so sure about that. This appears to be a "'Motorized pedalcycle.' A motor-driven cycle equipped with operable pedals, a motor rated no more than 1.5 brake horsepower, a cylinder capacity not exceeding 50 cubic centimeters, an automatic transmission, and a maximum design speed of no more than 25 miles per hour or an electric motor-driven cycle equipped with operable pedals and an automatic transmission powered by an electric battery or battery pack-powered electric motor with a maximum design speed of no more than 25 miles per hour." according to the code linked in the article. Oddly enough, there is no definition of "Motor Scooter."



Most states allow E-bikes, and the Trailz bikes are fine there. They comply with federal guidelines for E-bikes, although those guidelines can be overridden by states. New York (and now, I hear, Connecticut) doesn't allow them at all, although you can often still get away with riding them responsibly in many locales.

tesla33


quality posts: 57 Private Messages tesla33
Jixiar wrote:Regarding the EZ-TRZ Trailz Diamond Frame...caveat emptor!

The reviews on Amazon all seem to say "You get what you pay for", in a sliding scale of "It was cheap, but I'm happy for the price I paid," to "I'd never buy this again!"

LOTS of maintenance issues, warranty issues, broken parts, batteries not fully charging. Even when someone loves it, they still talk about the poor build quality and lack of battery life.

http://www.amazon.com/Currie-Technologies-Trailz-Electric-Bicycle/dp/B004QHG17O



I bought a diamond frame EZIP Trailz from Woot the last time they had them, for $350. It arrived undamaged, 9 weeks old, with a perfect battery pack that has performed great even in the 45 degree temps I've been riding it in. (You have to know how to treat SLA battery packs - they fail under abuse.) The only issue it had was the front brake was assembled with one incorrect washer; removing that and readjusting the brake more or less solved that. The front wheel is also slightly out of true, but I got a spoke wrench and will be fixing that myself. It hasn't stopped me from riding. Think of these bikes as old but proven tech, with build quality that is high for the price, but average on an objective scale. The bike has lots of power, works well, and I'd recommend it to anyone weighing less than 210lbs - they tend to snap rear spokes when fully loaded and/or ridden through potholes. Check out the earlier woot for lots of comments from me. Keep in mind, though, that there will always be some bikes that arrive damaged and/or defective. I just shipped back a $1400 Prodeco bike that was both damaged *and* had too-stiff forks. This bike is a great buy if your expectations are reasonable.

quizman125


quality posts: 4 Private Messages quizman125

Looks fun but at only 200 cycles on the battery, might only last a year or two. My work commute is about 6 miles (pretty close really) but at 12 miles per day, charging every other day basically this would last well under a year before needing a new battery.

Bezalel


quality posts: 9 Private Messages Bezalel

450 watts should propel a bicycle much faster than 15+ MPH.

tesla33


quality posts: 57 Private Messages tesla33
quizman125 wrote:Looks fun but at only 200 cycles on the battery, might only last a year or two. My work commute is about 6 miles (pretty close really) but at 12 miles per day, charging every other day basically this would last well under a year before needing a new battery.



The less you use of the full charge each cycle, the more cycles you get. If you can recharge right after each use (recharging the pack at work) you'd be looking at closer to 300-350 cycles. If not and you pedal with the motor, it should still be about 250-300 cycles. 200 cycles is the estimate for what you get if you use 80-90% of the charge each time you ride. There are also two lithium packs available, one much lighter 6.4AH pack that duplicates the range of the OEM SLA pack for about $350, giving you 3X as many cycles, and a 9.6AH pack that doubles the range for about $550 (I'll be watching for that one on sale after Xmas) and lasts about a thousand cycles.

tesla33


quality posts: 57 Private Messages tesla33
Bezalel wrote:450 watts should propel a bicycle much faster than 15+ MPH.



You're thinking that the drive runs through the derailleur. It doesn't: the ratio is fixed because it uses its own two sprockets and chain on the other side of the rear wheel. This is why the top speed is always the same under power. There is a mod that raises the drive gearing by one tooth and brings the speed up to 20MPH. You can also, if you pedal hard enough, get to 20MPH using your own power, although the ratios would have you pedaling very fast to do it*. The bikes is design to give you a lot of power and a reasonable top speed, rather than too little torque and a top speed that most riders don't need.

* Speaking of ratios: 1st is nice and low for starting off and to let you ride the bike home if you lose assist (although remember that it's a heavy bike, so any uphill riding without assist will be a real workout). 2nd is a bit too much of a jump up for comfort if not using the motor, but the other ratios are fairly close together and work well.

tesla33


quality posts: 57 Private Messages tesla33

Here's a link to the previous discussion, so I don't have to re-answer everything.

http://sport.woot.com/forums/viewpost.aspx?postid=5234951

hersheymanager


quality posts: 0 Private Messages hersheymanager

We're in Pa. and we have 2 of the Trailz bikes that we ride on sidewalks, bike trails, and 2 lane-roadways where sidewalks & trails doesn't exist... with no problem. For a 4-lane highway we see no bikes as that's likely illegal. We pedal -and- use the motor to assist going up hills and ride for hours before the battery depletes.

tesla33


quality posts: 57 Private Messages tesla33

One last note that applies to both the EZIP bikes and the scooters. The manuals tell you to "condition" the battery pack by running it through three "complete" discharge/recharge cycles. This is bunk, and is probably why the packs aren't rated for more cycles. The packs will condition themselves in normal use, and should *never* be discharged completely. They should also never be discharged more than is needed, never more than 90% (and even that is too much) and should always be recharged *immediately after use*. Follow these guidelines (and keep in mind that I've gotten ten years' use out of SLA batteries) and they should, if not defective, be good for 300 to as many as 500 charge cycles. The less you drain the pack per trip, the more cycles you will get from it.

terminatorgir


quality posts: 9 Private Messages terminatorgir

I think Hot Rod uses one of these right?

ghostofdavid


quality posts: 11 Private Messages ghostofdavid

I want to try before I would buy. This is the kind of bike that can help me keep my blood sugar up and continue the onslaught of diabetes to my body. Thanks, e-bikes! :D

Suck it, Trebek.

zandernow


quality posts: 0 Private Messages zandernow
mqstout wrote:http://www.dmv.state.pa.us/registration/scooters.shtml

Sadly they don't appear to be able to be legal to use in the public in Pennsylvania.



In most states there is a speed limit threshold to be considered a scooter which these would not violate.

zandernow


quality posts: 0 Private Messages zandernow

I recommend one of these for $400:

http://www.electric-bike-kit.com/hill-topper.aspx

tesla33


quality posts: 57 Private Messages tesla33
ghostofdavid wrote:I want to try before I would buy. This is the kind of bike that can help me keep my blood sugar up and continue the onslaught of diabetes to my body. Thanks, e-bikes! :D



I bought mine specifically to get my blood glucose down, and it works. It makes pedaling enjoyable, and I even spend about 1/3 of the time riding with no motor assist (down grades and on level ground). If you buy the bike as a cheap scooter and never pedal, it's unlikely that any exercise regime will help you.

asueper1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages asueper1
tesla33 wrote:This has no pedals at all.



No pedals? Where will I put my feet? I guess I'll just have to use those rotating platforms connected to the rear wheel by a chain.

tesla33


quality posts: 57 Private Messages tesla33
asueper1 wrote:No pedals? Where will I put my feet? I guess I'll just have to use those rotating platforms connected to the rear wheel by a chain.



I clicked on a link from the pedal-less scooters and got sent to this forum. I thus thought the question was about the standup scooters, and replied incorrectly. I have corrected that post now. Thanks for pointing it out.

zeta30


quality posts: 1 Private Messages zeta30

The battery pack is a Sealed Lead Acid, (SLA), pack which is not the best chemistry for an electric bike. There after market Li Ion packs which are lighter and aren't as susceptible to cold weather as SLA packs.

If you want a very durable battery then Li Ion Phosphate is the way to go like the A123 packs, (but they are getting harder to find) and you will probably need to make your own pack.

tesla33


quality posts: 57 Private Messages tesla33
zeta30 wrote:The battery pack is a Sealed Lead Acid, (SLA), pack which is not the best chemistry for an electric bike. There after market Li Ion packs which are lighter and aren't as susceptible to cold weather as SLA packs.

If you want a very durable battery then Li Ion Phosphate is the way to go like the A123 packs, (but they are getting harder to find) and you will probably need to make your own pack.



As I mentioned earlier, Currie actually makes (or at least sells) two different lithium packs that use the same housing and are a slip-in replacement. The SLA packs are problematic if you are heavy, if you need to use the maximum range regularly, or if you aren't that diligent about recharging things. It should be noted, though, that because they have a BMS (battery management system) the lithium packs actually have to be recharged more often when not in use than the SLA packs, which have no parasitic drain when off the bike. So as long as you get a good SLA pack, lithium isn't automatically a necessary upgrade. And if you get a defective one, Currie will replace it. Most people who love the bikes wait for the SLA pack to die, then replace it with a lithium pack.

guraqt12


quality posts: 1 Private Messages guraqt12

We have two bicycles with motors on them from Currie, the motor is in the center of the front wheel. It is virtually silent, We can get up to 28 mph on flat ground with no wind. If this bike setup is NOT WITH A RUBBER PIECE TURNING THE TIRE BY FRICTION, I would suggest buying two, one for her and one for him, and two sets of batteries each, HOWEVER, YOU deck the halls THE KIND THAT RUNS ON FRICTION AGAINST YOUR TIRE. YOU'LL BE REPLACING TIRES WAY TOO OFTEN! Remember, the more battery, the further you'll go without having to recharge. Check out the cost of 12 volt batteries that run 3 together for a total of 36 volts on each side. That would be a sweet ride for quite a few hours, and even longer if you pedal along the way. Go 30 miles, and don't worry if you're tired, use the battery power to rest when you need to. Use the battery power and pedal power when climbing hills.

guraqt12


quality posts: 1 Private Messages guraqt12

YES, THIS IS THE EXACT MOTOR WE PURCHASED ABOUT 9 YEARS AGO, FOR $325.00 EACH. THEY USE 3 SMALL 12 VOLT BATTERIES FOR A TOTAL OF 36 VOLTS WHICH FIT INTO ONE CASE ON TOP OF THE BACK BIKE BRACKET. WE LOVE OUR ELECTRIC BIKES, WE GET EXERCISE AND REST WHEN NEEDED. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS, BUT THE ONE ON SALE, I'M NOT SURE ABOUT BECAUSE YOU CANNOT TELL IF THE POWER IS BY A RUBBER KNOB TURNING THE WHEEL VIA FRICTION ON THE SIDE OF THE TIRE. IF THAT'S HOW IT'S POWERED, YOU DON'T WANT IT....BUT I CANNOT SEE IF THE MOTOR IS INSIDE THE SPOKES, OR EXTERNAL WITH THE BATTERY MAKING FRICTION ON THE TIRE.....YOU DON'T WANT TO PREMATURELY WEAR OUT YOUR TIRES.....JUST SAYIN XOXOXO, I WAS RESPONDING TO A PREVIOUS LINK THAT MENTIONED THIS SITE. http://www.electric-bike-kit.com/hill-topper.aspx

guraqt12


quality posts: 1 Private Messages guraqt12
mqstout wrote:http://www.dmv.state.pa.us/registration/scooters.shtml

Sadly they don't appear to be able to be legal to use in the public in Pennsylvania.



GAS motors are not allowed, however, electric are. Call your local non emergency number and inquire. You will be pleasantly surprised. In fact, these are even allowed in forest preserves, GAS POWERED BIKES ARE NOT.

guraqt12


quality posts: 1 Private Messages guraqt12
asueper1 wrote:No pedals? Where will I put my feet? I guess I'll just have to use those rotating platforms connected to the rear wheel by a chain.



There are pedals, you can pedal and actually get some exercise, if you choose to, or you can be fat and lazy and only use the electric power. It's all in your control.

tesla33


quality posts: 57 Private Messages tesla33
guraqt12 wrote:We have two bicycles with motors on them from Currie, the motor is in the center of the front wheel. It is virtually silent, We can get up to 28 mph on flat ground with no wind. If this bike setup is NOT WITH A RUBBER PIECE TURNING THE TIRE BY FRICTION, I would suggest buying two, one for her and one for him, and two sets of batteries each, HOWEVER, YOU deck the halls THE KIND THAT RUNS ON FRICTION AGAINST YOUR TIRE. YOU'LL BE REPLACING TIRES WAY TOO OFTEN! Remember, the more battery, the further you'll go without having to recharge. Check out the cost of 12 volt batteries that run 3 together for a total of 36 volts on each side. That would be a sweet ride for quite a few hours, and even longer if you pedal along the way. Go 30 miles, and don't worry if you're tired, use the battery power to rest when you need to. Use the battery power and pedal power when climbing hills.



These bikes are chain drive, not friction. And you can't 'over-volt' them to 36 volts without replacing the controller and throttle. It used to be possible on older models, but not this series. The only way to go faster (and with less acceleration) is by changing the motor sprocket to a slightly larger one.

Also, the bikes you have use hub motors, which are completely different from the direct drive, brushed motors on these bikes. Hub motors are quiet, but lack torque.

tesla33


quality posts: 57 Private Messages tesla33
guraqt12 wrote:YES, THIS IS THE EXACT MOTOR WE PURCHASED ABOUT 9 YEARS AGO, FOR $325.00 EACH. THEY USE 3 SMALL 12 VOLT BATTERIES FOR A TOTAL OF 36 VOLTS WHICH FIT INTO ONE CASE ON TOP OF THE BACK BIKE BRACKET. WE LOVE OUR ELECTRIC BIKES, WE GET EXERCISE AND REST WHEN NEEDED. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS, BUT THE ONE ON SALE, I'M NOT SURE ABOUT BECAUSE YOU CANNOT TELL IF THE POWER IS BY A RUBBER KNOB TURNING THE WHEEL VIA FRICTION ON THE SIDE OF THE TIRE. IF THAT'S HOW IT'S POWERED, YOU DON'T WANT IT....BUT I CANNOT SEE IF THE MOTOR IS INSIDE THE SPOKES, OR EXTERNAL WITH THE BATTERY MAKING FRICTION ON THE TIRE.....YOU DON'T WANT TO PREMATURELY WEAR OUT YOUR TIRES.....JUST SAYIN XOXOXO, I WAS RESPONDING TO A PREVIOUS LINK THAT MENTIONED THIS SITE. http://www.electric-bike-kit.com/hill-topper.aspx



This is a newer version of the older ( and louder) Currie motor. It will run on 36 volts only if you replace the controller and throttle. It uses a chain drive. Friction drives have gone the way of the Dodo bird.

You may also want to look into disabling your Caps Lock.