REDLINEVUE


quality posts: 0 Private Messages REDLINEVUE
jearly0000 wrote:Believe it. I usually see this item for around $45. I have no doubt the MSRP is up around $60. You're underestimating how good Eneloop batteries are, and the sexiness of the sparkle wrappers. You could make money buying these and flipping them on ebay in a few weeks if you desired



I have a fair amount of enloop batteries and have NEVER paid over $30 for a set of them.... and $30 was the MOST I paid (including shipping) for my Disney enloops from Japan. You would be a Applejack to pay $60

nekojan


quality posts: 3 Private Messages nekojan

This would be an Ok deal for those with $5 Woot code and without Costco membership.

Now, where's my code when I actually want to buy something? :\

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
shamcy wrote:That exact pack of 10 AA Eneloop 1500 charges is $19.99 at Costco. Forget about this deal and the amazon one, get it from Costco and save.



It would help if you included a link. A search of Costco shows no results for "Eneloop." In fact, a search of "batteries" did not result in any rechargeable AA batteries.

And even if such a deal exists, Costco charges s/h on most items. That would make the supposed Costco deal pretty much in line with Amazon ($25 + Free s/h).

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
jdelvoie wrote:You omitted the charger.

However, this review at Fatwallet puts things into a different light.
http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/expired-deals/1245288/

These are the older eneloops, rated at 1500 cycles, rather than the newer ones that hold a longer charge and are rated at 1800 cycles.

They also raise questions to the quality of the charger.



1) It's crappy semi-smart/dumb charger. The biggest problem is that it forces you to charge in pairs (2 or 4). In reality, it is very unlikely that 2 batteries will have discharged identically. That means one battery will be more discharged than the other. Yet this charger will stop charging once the less-discharged battery reaches full capacity. That means the other battery may be undercharged. Better battery chargers will monitor and charge each battery individually.

2) I'm not sure what you mean by older batteries. These are 2nd generation, just like the ones on Amazon. Realistically, even the cheaper 1st generation Eneloops are good enough for most household applications. 2nd and 3rd generations are superior only in that they hold a charge longer, and have more charge cycles. For items you use frequently, i.e. remote controls, you don't need to hold a charge for more than a year.

llamabox


quality posts: 36 Private Messages llamabox
REDLINEVUE wrote:63% off 62.98... Please, SOMEONE/ANYONE tell me when these batteries were ever SIXTY-TWO dollars!!?!?!?

C'mon woot... cut the drama



...please stay off the internet

Make your own damn beer

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
kinkajou1015 wrote:I got this on the last time it was up on the site. I love these batteries, kinda want to get two more sets so I have 4 of each color, I used them in a digital camera that uses AAs this past weekend, I never got a notification from the camera that they were dying over 5 days. I suggest getting a different charger however as the one it will come with doesn't shut itself off when the batteries are fully charged.



Modern chargers are not supposed to shut down after the batteries reach full capacity. It should go into trickle mode, as this one does. That's because many rechargeable batteries starts self-discharging the moment it stops charging. In fact, an ordinary NiMH battery can lose about 20% of its energy the very first day -- without any use! Modern chargers prevent this by going into trickle mode. It feeds the batteries very low levels of electricity for maintenance. The same is true of your cellphone charger and virtually every other charger.

sappharad


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sappharad
sdc100 wrote:It would help if you included a link. A search of Costco shows no results for "Eneloop." In fact, a search of "batteries" did not result in any rechargeable AA batteries.

And even if such a deal exists, Costco charges s/h on most items. That would make the supposed Costco deal pretty much in line with Amazon ($25 + Free s/h).


Costco doesn't sell everything they have in-store on their website. Pies are a good example.
I've seen the 10 packs of Eneloop AA's at Costco for $19.99 each. I believe the AAA pack was the same price. Both include the 2 plastic battery cases, like one of the links here had.

I'm not sure if the price is still current, the last time I bought some from there was over a year ago, because I haven't needed more yet.

auctionsaver


quality posts: 19 Private Messages auctionsaver

I started getting these about 4 years ago. They are great batteries and are all still going strong. While they are more expensive at first, they probably have saved me money in the long run, but you end up needing more than just 8 or 16. I have them in everything now that takes an AA or AAA.

The best part though is not the savings. It is knowing that I have always have some batteries ready in the charger in case ones in a remote or device run out. It is a real hassle saver.

auctionsaver


quality posts: 19 Private Messages auctionsaver
sdc100 wrote:1) It's crappy semi-smart/dumb charger. The biggest problem is that it forces you to charge in pairs (2 or 4). In reality, it is very unlikely that 2 batteries will have discharged identically. That means one battery will be more discharged than the other. Yet this charger will stop charging once the less-discharged battery reaches full capacity. That means the other battery may be undercharged. Better battery chargers will monitor and charge each battery individually.

2) I'm not sure what you mean by older batteries. These are 2nd generation, just like the ones on Amazon. Realistically, even the cheaper 1st generation Eneloops are good enough for most household applications. 2nd and 3rd generations are superior only in that they hold a charge longer, and have more charge cycles. For items you use frequently, i.e. remote controls, you don't need to hold a charge for more than a year.



You do realize that because it charges in pairs that they will both end up fully charged, right? If you have taken college physics, you know this is how batteries work.

Secondly, I think 80% of the devices out there always take 2,4 6... batteries. It is rarely an odd number.

StanleyS


quality posts: 5 Private Messages StanleyS
sdc100 wrote:It would help if you included a link. A search of Costco shows no results for "Eneloop."


Hardly anything you can find in a Costco warehouse is available on their website and vice versa.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
compmikey wrote:The Amazon deal doesn't include a charger. I suppose it would be good to buy both if you use alot of AA rechargables.



For most people, the Amazon deal is better for several reasons:

1) Woot charges $5 s/h. Amazon's deal offers Free s/h. Ignoring taxes, that means Woot is charging $27.99 for 8 batteries and a crappy charger (see my previous post) while Amazon is charging $25 for 10 batteries.

2) Amazon has an easy refund policy, even on items sold by outside vendors. Woot is a closeout site, and as such, they expectedly have a less generous return policy. For example, Woot does not offer refunds or exchanges for Buyer's Remorse (nor should they).

3) However, the Woot offering is better for gifting, especially as a stocking stuffer. Not only does it include a [CRAPPY] charger so there's nothing more to buy, but the batteries come in a metallic rainbow. That makes it more festive for gifting, and especially great for certain events, i.e. Gay Pride.

beastiekeith


quality posts: 0 Private Messages beastiekeith

I have been using Eneloop batteries for about 2 years now for primarily for my off camera flash, but also for everything else. I have invested in about $100 on AA and AAA plus a good charger. My experience with these batteries has been great and I doubt anyone will actually realize the difference between the new and old version as the old version can be recharged 1500 times you'll be lucky if any technology is still using AA by the time you charge it the 1500th time. I do not own this charger, but would make sure of one thing before purchasing. Eneloop makes two types of chargers, one cheap one in which you must have either 2 or 4 batteries in the charger, otherwise it will not charge, and another which chargers each position separately so you can also charge 1 or 3 batteries at a time. I wouldn't waste my time with this deal if it is for their cheap charger. Even if it is for the better charger it is only slightly cheaper than on Amazon which for me would be negated by my Amazon Prime vs $5 shipping.

jorandax


quality posts: 2 Private Messages jorandax
sdc100 wrote:Modern chargers are not supposed to shut down after the batteries reach full capacity. It should go into trickle mode, as this one does. That's because many rechargeable batteries starts self-discharging the moment it stops charging. In fact, an ordinary NiMH battery can lose about 20% of its energy the very first day -- without any use! Modern chargers prevent this by going into trickle mode. It feeds the batteries very low levels of electricity for maintenance. The same is true of your cellphone charger and virtually every other charger.



Purchased this last month from woot.

This Sunpack charger comes in a blank cardboard box with instructions that say that the indicator light will activate when charging but will not deactivate when complete. It additionally states "do not overcharge," which (doesn't prove but) suggests the charger has the capability to do so since the instructions are for the charger and not for the batteries. Using another charger may be better for these batteries if you have one available.

These batteries are available in more current iterations, and at higher mAh, but this particular multicolor pack seems to be out of production, so if you want these really spiffy colors, this could be your last chance.

I've used these batteries in a Nikon SB-800 Speedlight with satisfaction.

traalfaz


quality posts: 1 Private Messages traalfaz
jdelvoie wrote:You omitted the charger.

They also raise questions to the quality of the charger.



It's not a good charger. There are only two charge circuits, batteries are charged in pairs. This is an immediate tip-off that this is a lousy charger. I wouldn't use it if given it unless I had no other choice.

A good charger has a separate circuit for each cell, and uses -dV charging (most do, this isn't expensive to do anymore). You can get GOOD chargers for < $10. So IMO this set is properly price-compared assuming that the charger is worth $0. Given that, this is not a good deal.

b1majka


quality posts: 1 Private Messages b1majka

I have completely converted to these batteries. They are as good or even better than the top name brands. We've been using them for 4 years now and we have not had one single issue. But buyer beware. There are fakes in the market. You can look on Amazon for full details on how to spot them. Also I have found much better deals there too. This battery is quite heavy. You may not be able to tell the difference between them and a regular battery. The charge time lasts as long as regular bateries too. Sense I have completely converted to these I have not ever run out of batteries. Highly reccommend them.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
auctionsaver wrote:You do realize that because it charges in pairs that they will both end up fully charged, right? If you have taken college physics, you know this is how batteries work.

Secondly, I think 80% of the devices out there always take 2,4 6... batteries. It is rarely an odd number.



WRONG.

1) Not only have I taken "college physics," I've taught it. My research is in neurophysiology and electrophysiology, and guess what, the physics of electricity is a major component. At a Masters and PhD level. You might want to avoid making inflammatory assumptions, and focus on the topic. If you disagree with my information, post a correction -- WITH FACTS AND AN ARGUMENT. Your uninformative post was helpful to no one, and would have gotten an F in my class.

2) Try reading my post and thinking things through before posting. If two batteries have not been identically discharged, one would OBVIOUSLY charge to full capacity faster than the other (given the same mA charge rate). And this charger automatically goes to trickle charge once ONE of the battery is fully charged to prevent overcharging. It does NOT send one battery to trickle charge and continues to charge the other at full rate. So if a person was to take the batteries out once the Full light comes on, the weaker battery would be undercharged. Simple. So what is it you don't understand?

If you had read my post carefully, you would have seen that I wrote "That means the other battery MAY be undercharged. Better battery chargers will monitor and charge each battery individually." Note the word "MAY." That would indeed be the case if someone was to remove the batteries immediately after the charger indicates full since in reality, only the less-discharged battery is full. At a trickle rate, it may take several more hours for the weaker battery to reach full.

Frankly, I'm surprised you didn't already know this since it is a well-known criticism of these chargers that charge in pairs. Do your research and think before you post.

3) You wrote "Secondly, I think 80% of the devices out there always take 2,4 6... batteries. It is rarely an odd number." So what? When did i claim that most chargers were smart or charged in odd numbers? You're arguing a point no one ever made. What I said was that it's better to use a charger that can charge individually. And they're not rare. The highly rated LaCrosse charger, for example, charges and monitors each battery individually. So does the MaHa. And several others I own. Look them up on Amazon and see what people who really know about batteries say. In fact, you may even see my comments.

Seriously ... calm down and think things through before you post. And lay off the assumptions and insults.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
sappharad wrote:Costco doesn't sell everything they have in-store on their website. Pies are a good example.
I've seen the 10 packs of Eneloop AA's at Costco for $19.99 each. I believe the AAA pack was the same price. Both include the 2 plastic battery cases, like one of the links here had.

I'm not sure if the price is still current, the last time I bought some from there was over a year ago, because I haven't needed more yet.



Well, then the original Costco claim is not very helpful since not all stores will have them in stock. In fact, not all of us have Costcos nearby. I live in lower Manhattan, NYC, and none are close by. A roundtrip by subway costs $5. The time, trouble and expense of having to drive/park makes the Woot and Amazon deal as good or even better than the Costco one.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
b1majka wrote:I have completely converted to these batteries. They are as good or even better than the top name brands.



In terms of Low Self-Discharge (LSD) NiMH batteries, Sanyo Eneloops is the "top name brand." They invented LSDs, and are currently the leader in terms of recharge cycles and discharge rate. While many companies have matched their first generation Eneloops, only Sanyo has batteries that meet their 3rd generation profile. And as far as I know, no one matches their 2nd generation batteries either.

That said, I still prefer regular quality alkalines for critical operation, i.e. smoke detectors, medical monitors, emergency flashlights that are used very seldomly, etc. Not only can modern alkalines hold a charge for 8-10 years, but their voltage is higher at 1.5V (as opposed to the 1.2V of NiMH batteries). That's 20% weaker and can make a difference in battery life as well as functioning, i.e. the brightness of a [unregulated] flashlight as well as the volume of an alarm. Indeed, some older equipment will not function at 1.2V, i.e. I have an Olympus recorder that needs a regular 1.5V battery. Better safe than sorry.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
REDLINEVUE wrote:I have a fair amount of enloop batteries and have NEVER paid over $30 for a set of them.... and $30 was the MOST I paid (including shipping) for my Disney enloops from Japan. You would be a Applejack to pay $60



It depends on what you mean by "a set," and the generation of the batteries. Is "a set" 4 batteries or 20 batteries? And while 1st Generation Eneloops are common and much imitated, 3rd Generations are very rare, especially in the US. Many eBay offerings are fake. So if you need the extra features of 3rd Generation Eneloops, $60 is not a "Applejackic" price to pay for a set of 15.

sashak7


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sashak7

I have had this charger for many years and it's great.It works with AA and AAA rechargeables. Certainly charges within 5 hours. I just got 2 packs of this sparkley kind last month from WOOT and am very glad I did.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
jorandax wrote:Purchased this last month from woot.

This Sunpack charger comes in a blank cardboard box with instructions that say that the indicator light will activate when charging but will not deactivate when complete. It additionally states "do not overcharge," which (doesn't prove but) suggests the charger has the capability to do so since the instructions are for the charger and not for the batteries. Using another charger may be better for these batteries if you have one available.

These batteries are available in more current iterations, and at higher mAh, but this particular multicolor pack seems to be out of production, so if you want these really spiffy colors, this could be your last chance.

I've used these batteries in a Nikon SB-800 Speedlight with satisfaction.



Yeah, I believe these metallic rainbow batteries were a Special Limited Edition so they're probably no longer manufactured. Another reason they're great for gifting.

If you use rechargeables with a flash, you might want to look into the new NiZn batteries. They are unique in that they have a 1.6V capacity, which is even higher than alkaline's 1.5V, and much higher than the 1.2V of NiMH/NiCd batteries. For flashes, that means a much quicker flash rate. Whether that's good or bad is debatable. Some claim that the faster flash rate can damage the flash. Other swear by the NiZn batteries. You can see the debate on Amazon. While I own NiZn batteries, I'm not a photographer so I can't comment. They cost about the same as ordinary NiMh batteries and unfortunately, have the same self-discharge profile as regular NiMH batteries. Please note that you'll need an NiZN charger since these cannot be charged in a regular NiMH charger.



Fountain3586


quality posts: 32 Private Messages Fountain3586
auctionsaver wrote:I started getting these about 4 years ago. They are great batteries and are all still going strong. While they are more expensive at first, they probably have saved me money in the long run, but you end up needing more than just 8 or 16. I have them in everything now that takes an AA or AAA.

The best part though is not the savings. It is knowing that I have always have some batteries ready in the charger in case ones in a remote or device run out. It is a real hassle saver.



I got Probation recently. Haha. Nice.

Favorite Woots: The First Years miSwivel Feeding Chair, Kiddy Sport’n Move Stroller, Sacs of Life Insulator 4 Reusable Shopping Bags, Daiwa Golf Bag, Energizer Light on Demand Twin Light Center, Ooma Telo ViIP Home Phone System, and a Stainless Steel Designer 6 Ounce Flask.

Ruzzell


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Ruzzell

I've used Eneloops in a Canon 580EX II external camera flash for the last 2 years. Would not use anything else. I can shoot an event and take 500+ photos on one charge. They also don't overheat. Regular non-recharge batteries will overheat (so hot you can't hold them) if used in a flash and shooting consecutive photos.

IAmCole


quality posts: 0 Private Messages IAmCole
ckeilah wrote:This is the charger you want for these:
http://www.amazon.com/Powerex-Maha-MH-C801D-Eight-Charger/dp/B000E5S648/

Also, note that the batteries on amazon and Costco, IIRC, are not the brony sparkle rainbow version.

BTW, NiMH batteries do not have "memory" like niCad do, so all this noise is just marketing blather. "Squirrel nut batteries also don't have the memory problem of some other, lesser, batteries," is about as meaningful. :-P

Note that NiMH and NiCad cells put out 1.2V, not the full 1.5V of an alkaline or lithium cell. There are a few items that will not function properly with that .3V lack. Most items won't care. Just be aware.

Finally, 1500 cycles has got to be a joke. Maybe if they are cycled PERFECTLY, like 75% down to 25% and back, in a perfect environment, with only a perfect rest period, in a continuous 24/7 test room. 500 charges is more like real world truth.

In my long sordid experience with batteries I get about 100 cycles before something goes awry and I have to replace the cell. If you spend a lot of time monitoring your batteries every week/month and NEVER let a cell drop below .8V or get above 130°F, the death knell for NiMHs, you might get closer to 1000 usable cycles. I'm skeptical of even 700, ie 2 years of daily cycling. O_o



I have a bunch of eneloops and have had issues with the stock charger that comes with it. I just ordered this charger based on your recommendation and the positive reviews on Amazon. Hopefully it solves all my woes :-). Thanks for the recommendation.

Note: despite my problems with the charger, I use these in my Xbox controllers and they work awesome. They seem to last forever.

fishymd


quality posts: 0 Private Messages fishymd
pupyluvr wrote:These would be perfect for Bronies... apparently that is a real thing and not just a Meme.



Hey, thats not the world according to Bronies, thats the world according to Republicans!

Bandrik


quality posts: 77 Private Messages Bandrik
pupyluvr wrote:These would be perfect for Bronies... apparently that is a real thing and not just a Meme.



Funny you should say that. I bought these exact batteries last time woot had them, figuring I could always use more eneloops, and I liked the colors.

The very day they arrive, I also received a "secret Santa gift exchange" package in the mail. Yup, it was ponies, trollololol.

Have to admit it though: it's rather uncanny how much they match up.






Oh, and that black one? That one goes to Nightmare Moon, of course.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
zonkerrob wrote:These may be a later generation with real improvements in shelf life and # of charge cycles. Be careful when comparing on these, the last time they were offered different gens threw a lot of people. To my memory, these are 2nd G, much better than 1st and just a little under latest.



Both these batteries on Woot and the ones on Amazon are 2nd Generation Eneloops, so they are internally identical. Only the packaging is different.

I was the one who raised the stink during the last Woot, and I still feel bad that ThunderThighs had to wake up the Web programmer to correct the mistake. What happened was that Woot had mistakenly listed 1000 recharge cycles for these batteries, leading to confusion as to whether they were 1st or 2nd Generation. 1st Gen Eneloops have 1000 cycles while 2nd Gen Eneloops have 1500 cycles (3rd Gen has 1800). They soon verified that these are2nd Gen and changed the description to say 1500 cycles. It was important enough to wake the Web guy because the price was awful for 1st Gen Eneloops but pretty good for 2nd Gen ones.

ingoldsby


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ingoldsby

I bought this last time it came up and I have to be honest, I'm a bit disappointed. The batteries themselves are 1900mAh compared to my La Crosse AA's that are 2600mAh, and the charger is quite honestly, crap. It doesn't even stop providing a charge to the batteries automatically, just keeps throwing juice at them until you remove them from the charger.

Bandrik


quality posts: 77 Private Messages Bandrik
REDLINEVUE wrote:You would be a Applejack to pay $60





For the purpose of posterity, the woot filter is currently changing "m o r o n" to "Applejack". Who at Woot is a brony...?

LaDiosa


quality posts: 0 Private Messages LaDiosa
Mustard wrote:Does anyone know if this charger would work on European voltages? I mean, I have the adapters, but wonder what throwing 220 instead of 110 into these batteries would do. Would a faster charge time be the only side effect or there the possibility for smoke and fire?



AuraCelia Almanzar-Colon

LaDiosa


quality posts: 0 Private Messages LaDiosa
LaDiosa wrote:



I would suggest a volt changer you can get one on ebay for a reasonable cost. Otherwise smoke and burned battery is a definite possibility.

While I'm not sure of either I wouldnt take a chance.

AuraCelia Almanzar-Colon

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
starmanbackwards wrote:do theses batteries SELF DISCHARGE when not being in use like the NIMH ?
thanks



No ... mostly. The whole point of Eneloops and other Low Self-Discharge (LSD) batteries is that they don't lose a charge in storage. That said, even the best LSD NiMH batteries don't match the best alkalines for shelf-life. Duracell, for example, claims that their batteries retain 80% of its capacity after 10 years. The best Eneloops, at 3rd Generation, claims to retain 70% after 5 years.

These are 2nd Generation, which means they will retain 85% after 1 year, 80% after 2 years and about 75% after 3 years. No data is available beyond that. That's a HUGE improvement over regular NiMH batteries which can lose 20% of its capacity the very FIRST DAY it leaves the charger. And most will be totally empty in less than a year, even without use.

So in answer to your question, they do self-discharge, but as such a low rate that it's meaningless for most applications. For example, if you use your remote control daily, you will like discharge the batteries from normal use before it self-discharges. In fact, even cheap 1st Generation Eneloops are fine for most applications (they retain about 80% of their capacity after 1 year). But because regular alkalines are still more stable, I would recommend them overany rechargeable NiMH batteries for critical applications like smoke detectors and medical monitoring. For smoke detectors, I'd say get a Lithium battery. They are very stable and last about 7-10 years WHILE RUNNING, and have a storage life way beyond that.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
ingoldsby wrote:I bought this last time it came up and I have to be honest, I'm a bit disappointed. The batteries themselves are 1900mAh compared to my La Crosse AA's that are 2600mAh, and the charger is quite honestly, crap. It doesn't even stop providing a charge to the batteries automatically, just keeps throwing juice at them until you remove them from the charger.



The LaCrosse AA batteries are not Low Self-Discharge (LSD). They are ordinary NiMH batteries that will be empty in a few months even without use. These Eneloops will retain a charge for years in storage. Ordinary AA NiMH batteries have capacities of 2500-3000 mAh. The highest capacity Eneloop, Pro XX-Powered, can hold up to 2500 mAh.

The higher capacity of your LaCrosse is only advantageous if you plan to use the batteries immediately, and fully, i.e. snapping photos on vacation or long video game sessions. If your device is stored for a month or two, these LSD batteries will soon have more energy despite the LaCrosse having started out with more energy.

And no, even this crap charger does NOT keep throwing energy into the batteries once one battery is full. Instead, it goes into a much lower energy trickle mode. That protects the batteries from overcharging and prevents self-discharge. Keep in mind that the included charger was made for ordinary NiMH batteries so self-discharge is a problem.

radi0j0hn


quality posts: 98 Private Messages radi0j0hn
starmanbackwards wrote:do theses batteries SELF DISCHARGE when not being in use like the NIMH ?
thanks



The the breakthrough advantage, they don't self-discharge nearly as much as NiMh. However, they are not (yet) quite as high capacity as NiMh.

acpress.com Not cute, but useful.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
BigRobi wrote:What's the diff betwenn akaline and NIMH batteries



I will compare alkalines to these Low Self-Discharge NiMh batteries, not ordinary NiMH batteries (which have a higher capacity but lower shelf life).

ALKALINE
Voltage = 1.5V
Rechargeability = generally no. You CAN charge them, but you risk leaking and the capacity falls fast.
Capacity = 1800-2600mAh
Shelf life = the new Duracells claim to retain 80% of its energy after 10 years
Cost = cheaper initially but more expensive over time

LSD NiMH
Voltage = 1.2V
Rechargeability = Yes. 1000-1800 cycles.
Capacity = 2000 mAh, although Eneloop Pro can go as high as 2500mAh.
Shelf life = it depends on the generation. The latest 3rd Generation Eneloops claim to retain 70% after 5 years. These 2nd Gen Eneloops sold by Woot, however, only guarantee 75% retention after 3 years.
Cost = more expensive initially, but cheaper over its lifetime

satyenshah


quality posts: 8 Private Messages satyenshah

Why won't woot ever sell a battery bundle with a more upscale charger? Everytime there's a battery deal everyone complains about battery-roasting chargers, and raves about more digitally enhanced chargers from La Crosse.

It makes no sense that day after day woot sells $87 bottles of fermented grape juice, $15 chocolate bars, and $20 tins of paprika, but but never a battery charger worth more than five bucks.

auctionsaver


quality posts: 19 Private Messages auctionsaver
sdc100 wrote:WRONG.

1) Not only have I taken "college physics," I've taught it. My research is in neurophysiology and electrophysiology, and guess what, the physics of electricity is a major component. At a Masters and PhD level. You might want to avoid making inflammatory assumptions, and focus on the topic. If you disagree with my information, post a correction -- WITH FACTS AND AN ARGUMENT. Your uninformative post was helpful to no one, and would have gotten an F in my class.

2) Try reading my post and thinking things through before posting. If two batteries have not been identically discharged, one would OBVIOUSLY charge to full capacity faster than the other (given the same mA charge rate). And this charger automatically goes to trickle charge once ONE of the battery is fully charged to prevent overcharging. It does NOT send one battery to trickle charge and continues to charge the other at full rate. So if a person was to take the batteries out once the Full light comes on, the weaker battery would be undercharged. Simple. So what is it you don't understand?

If you had read my post carefully, you would have seen that I wrote "That means the other battery MAY be undercharged. Better battery chargers will monitor and charge each battery individually." Note the word "MAY." That would indeed be the case if someone was to remove the batteries immediately after the charger indicates full since in reality, only the less-discharged battery is full. At a trickle rate, it may take several more hours for the weaker battery to reach full.

Frankly, I'm surprised you didn't already know this since it is a well-known criticism of these chargers that charge in pairs. Do your research and think before you post.

3) You wrote "Secondly, I think 80% of the devices out there always take 2,4 6... batteries. It is rarely an odd number." So what? When did i claim that most chargers were smart or charged in odd numbers? You're arguing a point no one ever made. What I said was that it's better to use a charger that can charge individually. And they're not rare. The highly rated LaCrosse charger, for example, charges and monitors each battery individually. So does the MaHa. And several others I own. Look them up on Amazon and see what people who really know about batteries say. In fact, you may even see my comments.

Seriously ... calm down and think things through before you post. And lay off the assumptions and insults.



You are overlooking that given time, they will equalize as they are connected in parrallel. I am not suggesting that when they first finish charging, that they will be equal, given enough time, they will equalize to their maximum capacity. PS: you aren't the only one with a graduate degree.

If you put two batteries in the charger and let them trickle, with enough time, they will equalize. The complaints come from folks who throw a single empty and a nearly full on in and then pop them at out as soon as the light goes constant. This is why my suggestion was to have extras in my previous post and let them trickle.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hfYJsQAhl0

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
ckeilah wrote:This is the charger you want for these:
http://www.amazon.com/Powerex-Maha-MH-C801D-Eight-Charger/dp/B000E5S648/

Also, note that the batteries on amazon and Costco, IIRC, are not the brony sparkle rainbow version.

BTW, NiMH batteries do not have "memory" like niCad do, so all this noise is just marketing blather. "Squirrel nut batteries also don't have the memory problem of some other, lesser, batteries," is about as meaningful. :-P

Note that NiMH and NiCad cells put out 1.2V, not the full 1.5V of an alkaline or lithium cell. There are a few items that will not function properly with that .3V lack. Most items won't care. Just be aware.

Finally, 1500 cycles has got to be a joke. Maybe if they are cycled PERFECTLY, like 75% down to 25% and back, in a perfect environment, with only a perfect rest period, in a continuous 24/7 test room. 500 charges is more like real world truth.

In my long sordid experience with batteries I get about 100 cycles before something goes awry and I have to replace the cell. If you spend a lot of time monitoring your batteries every week/month and NEVER let a cell drop below .8V or get above 130°F, the death knell for NiMHs, you might get closer to 1000 usable cycles. I'm skeptical of even 700, ie 2 years of daily cycling. O_o



A couple of thangs:

1) I prefer the LaCrosse over the Maha, especially since I got it on eBay for about $19. NLee has done some good comparisons of the two on Amazon.

2) The NiCd memory effect is apparently a myth too! It was based on some atypical aerospace batteries in a specialized situation. Apparently, most people mistake other negative effects as a memory effect. I believe Wikipedia has a good article on this. I remember reading some other good web articles too.

As a matter of fact, NiCd is preferred over other rechargeables for certain applications because of its discharge profile under a load. That's why many professional tools use NiCds over NiMH.

2) Please note that the true voltage of lithium cells is not 1.5V, even though it's usually listed as such for compatibility. It's actually more like 1.7V. I've confirmed this by measuring over 10 AA lithiums from various companies. See this.

3) Agreed about recharge cycles. I don't have any AA-battery device that I need to charge more than once every 2 weeks. Most are charged every few months. At that rate, even 1st generation Eneloops will last me about 10-50 years. In that time, I'll either die, lose the batteries, or a new energy technology will come along. That means the 1000 recharge cycles vs the 1800 cycles of 1st Gen vs. 3rd Gen is largely irrelevant for most people.

sdc100


quality posts: 507 Private Messages sdc100
satyenshah wrote:Why won't woot ever sell a battery bundle with a more upscale charger? Everytime there's a battery deal everyone complains about battery-roasting chargers, and raves about more digitally enhanced chargers from La Crosse.

It makes no sense that day after day woot sells $87 bottles of fermented grape juice, $15 chocolate bars, and $20 tins of paprika, but but never a battery charger worth more than five bucks.



Generally-speaking, Woot is a closeout site and will rarely offer current hotsellers like the LaCrosse or MaHa.

jaybird622


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jaybird622

Why isn't the shipping free?