WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Toro 1800 Power Curve Snow Blower

Speed to First Woot:
2m 39.006s
First Sucker:
jedgington
Last Wooter to Woot:
bmak57
Last Purchase:
a year ago
Order Pace (rank):
Bottom 42% of Woot.com Woots
Top 27% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Top 8% of Woot.com Woots
Top 4% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

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  • 7% second woot
  • 31% < 10 woots
  • 20% < 25 woots
  • 25% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 13% joined today
  • 0% one week old
  • 0% one month old
  • 9% one year old
  • 77% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 97% bought 1
  • 2% bought 2
  • 0% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

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Quality Posts


wootalyzer


quality posts: 1 Private Messages wootalyzer

Wootalyzer's Pricing Post! - The price of today's woot item is saved here for future reference
------------------------------------------------------------
Toro 1800 Power Curve Snow Blower
$129.99 + $5 Standard Shipping
Condition: New

*DISCLAIMER* Wootalyzer! is in no way affiliated with Woot!, and this post may not always be here!

lichme


quality posts: 2693 Private Messages lichme

4 Star review average over on Human Resources

baybei


quality posts: 49 Private Messages baybei

Well, where was this during Nemo? I could have used this on my driveway, especially since the plow left a 5 foot high, 2 foot wide pile in front of my driveway!

GURABoy


quality posts: 10 Private Messages GURABoy

I've seen a lot of snow blowers over the years, but always gas-powered. Anyone have any experience with electric? Decent price, but I have to say I'm skeptical, like I am of electric chainsaws...

gooseygoose


quality posts: 9 Private Messages gooseygoose

Its crazy there is actually places that get enough snow to blow around. Tell me oh people who actually get a winter, where do you blow the snow to?

conanthelibrarian


quality posts: 3165 Private Messages conanthelibrarian

4.6 out of 5.0 over at snowblowersdirect.com

http://www.snowblowersdirect.com/Toro-38381-Snow-Thrower/p2349.html

dviglino


quality posts: 10 Private Messages dviglino
gooseygoose wrote:Its crazy there is actually places that get enough snow to blow around. Tell me oh people who actually get a winter, where do you blow the snow to?



...anywhere that is not on the walkways or driveway.

I saw this and thought: YES! Finally! But then saw it was electric. Guess it could work right outside the garage, but I'd need a LONG extension cord for the driveway... and then I'm worried about electric outages.

Still. Pretty good price...

bluetide


quality posts: 2 Private Messages bluetide

I am looking for a snow blower for quite a while now, gas-powered ones, but they are three times this price. Any suggestions why someone would opt for electric for gas beside the price point? Is it better to spend some more money now to get convenience of having a gas-powered one for the years to come? Any suggestions/comments? Thanks.

edit: one more point, I live in the Midwest/Chicago

chrismcclure


quality posts: 1 Private Messages chrismcclure
gooseygoose wrote:Its crazy there is actually places that get enough snow to blow around. Tell me oh people who actually get a winter, where do you blow the snow to?



off the sidewalk and out of your driveway into your yard

SalsaShark42


quality posts: 9 Private Messages SalsaShark42

Yeah, good luck with this, unless you live in Texas.

It's electric and has no torque, which makes it completely ineffective at handling "wet" snow.

It's also single stage, which means if you get anything more than, say, four inches of snow, this thing will clog.

jpsyche


quality posts: 6 Private Messages jpsyche
GURABoy wrote:I've seen a lot of snow blowers over the years, but always gas-powered. Anyone have any experience with electric? Decent price, but I have to say I'm skeptical, like I am of electric chainsaws...



I've had mine for nine years, and it's pretty great. This model has the one improvement mine lacks - the directional chute locks now, mine tends to throw the snow too low if the snowfall is too wet or sparse. Otherwise, it's abfab. You'll be glad you got this next season when it fires right up without have to go back to the shop for a tuneup. It easily handles snowfall up to about 6-7 inches, but it's light enough to pick up by the handle and do two passes if needed. I usually just stay ahead of the snowfall by doing a pass once it's close to six inches, because it's just not a big deal to do so. If you haven't had electric before, you'll want to make sure you have a power cord that's long enough and flexible in cold weather.

Fountain3586


quality posts: 32 Private Messages Fountain3586

It was a very cold, very snowy and very very windy day. University classes were cancelled (which almost never happens) and I was on a rampage. Early that afternoon I had visited a computer lab at the school and shortly after walking outside into the snow, I dropped my cell phone. I didn't realize it until I got to the car. Then a part of me remembered hearing something weird when I had first got outside. I figured it must have been my phone, so I went back. There was 8-12 inches of snow on the ground in some spots and two students were using snow blowers to clean the sidewalks. I searched and searched and then all of a sudden I hear a "what the heck" come from one of those students. The snow blower made a funny noise and my cell phone went flying through the air at exponential speeds. Slamming back into a snow bank, my phone laid there wet, cold, and barely scratched. How did this happen? Why is there not more damage I wondered? Of course I wanted to be able to call my parents and tell them before my phone died that I would not be going home that weekend because the weather was too bad. I couldn't see the number I was dialing and the phone had no picture at all, but it dialed and my mother answered. She said, "Hell"... (and what I figured was supposed to be HELLO) and the phone was dead. I figured, "Hell", what a great description of what my phone just went through...

The end. I have many many more cellular phone stories... many of which are with that same phone.

Favorite Woots: The First Years miSwivel Feeding Chair, Kiddy Sport’n Move Stroller, Sacs of Life Insulator 4 Reusable Shopping Bags, Daiwa Golf Bag, Energizer Light on Demand Twin Light Center, Ooma Telo ViIP Home Phone System, and a Stainless Steel Designer 6 Ounce Flask.

chrismcclure


quality posts: 1 Private Messages chrismcclure
SalsaShark42 wrote:Yeah, good luck with this, unless you live in Texas.

It's electric and has no torque, which makes it completely ineffective at handling "wet" snow.

It's also single stage, which means if you get anything more than, say, four inches of snow, this thing will clog.



Also note the puny little sissy wheels...it's likely you'll have to shovel a spot to start so you can get it going. Definetely not for places like South Dakota. $120 is nice, but just not useful up here

neonneon


quality posts: 1 Private Messages neonneon

Bought this exact model on Amazon two weeks ago, and used it 6 hours ago on a fair amount of wet, sloppy snow. I concur with the reviews on Amazon... it handles snow like a champ.

Again, if you're thinking about getting this, DO read the Amazon reviews. You need to get an appropriate gauge extension cord, which will run another $40-60 for a soft winterized one. The damn cord DOES get in the way, which is the only limitation to this snowblower as far as I can tell.

acanarelli


quality posts: 208 Private Messages acanarelli
GURABoy wrote:I've seen a lot of snow blowers over the years, but always gas-powered. Anyone have any experience with electric? Decent price, but I have to say I'm skeptical, like I am of electric chainsaws...



There are a few things you need not worry about with electric equipment over gas: Electric starts EASY. No need to drain fuel at end of season. Very light weight. No fire hazard keeping fuel in garage. Far less expensive than the gas alternative. Easy to store, hangs up on garage wall. No need for repair charges every 3 to 4 years.

Btw, I own a small Toro electric which my wife bought me about 25 years ago. I still have it and I still use it.

pupyluvr


quality posts: 48 Private Messages pupyluvr

In for 3!

tiler100


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tiler100

Yeah. I need a snow blower. It's Denton, Tx. Can I get a leaf blower, please?!?

Good luck, everyone. Woot sells good stuff, just ignores their own hood once-in-a-while. We, down here, forgive them tho.

LEM-


quality posts: 147 Private Messages LEM-
GURABoy wrote:I've seen a lot of snow blowers over the years, but always gas-powered. Anyone have any experience with electric? Decent price, but I have to say I'm skeptical, like I am of electric chainsaws...



All depends on what you need to clean. Here's the breakdown.

There are two types of snow blowers out there: one stage and two stage.

The two stage blowers are the most robust - they use slow moving but powerful augers to pick up snow, also breaking down the dense snow and eating through the snow packed by a plow. They push the snow into high speed impeller which throws it up the chute and out of your way. Oh, and they also are usually self-propelled too. That's the kind you probably see most often. They require a lot of power, much more than a standard household 15 or 20 amp wiring can deliver. So they are always gas powered (as far as I know).

The single stage blowers use high speed auger/impeller combination that both picks up the snow and throws it up the chute. Those come in both gas and electric versions. The gas versions have a bit more kick to them, though can't match two stage machines, because the augers need to spin at high speed (and therefore less power to them), making it harder to work on ice and heavily packed snow. With some luck you may be able to go through lightly packed snow that a plow left behind.

The electric models have even less power. They are great for fresh snow that isn't packed, and practically helpless against the piles of snow a plow would leave by your driveway (especially the morning after).

So all in all - if you live where there's lots of snow, two stage is the way to go. If you want to do a job similar to that shown on the last picture (that is just move well less than a foot of fresh snow off your driveway and sidewalks) this guy may do the work. If you are up to anything bigger - consider gas.

P.S. I own an electric chainsaw and it's doing the work just fine... But my snow blower is a gas powered two stage kind.

thumperchick


quality posts: 234 Private Messages thumperchick
gooseygoose wrote:Its crazy there is actually places that get enough snow to blow around. Tell me oh people who actually get a winter, where do you blow the snow to?



Usually the yard... Or at that kid who eggs people's houses...



This wouldn't be feasible here. Our walkway is 100 ft in the front. Imagine keeping track of all that cord? We'll keep to our gas powered, gets the job done, no dealing with an expensive cord that only really gets used with the snowblower.

jpsyche


quality posts: 6 Private Messages jpsyche
SalsaShark42 wrote:Yeah, good luck with this, unless you live in Texas.

It's electric and has no torque, which makes it completely ineffective at handling "wet" snow.

It's also single stage, which means if you get anything more than, say, four inches of snow, this thing will clog.



Not true, not true and not true.

L2


quality posts: 2 Private Messages L2

meh.

kind of a mickey mouse type of snowblower, single stage is weak, shoveling small amounts of snow is good for you and easier than using a machine..

if you live where i do and get the amount of snow we get,[minnesota] then you know that only gas powered will help you in the really heavy minnesota winters.

this thing will not move any kind of real amount of snow, that i couldnt do better by hand with a shovel...

Perception Management.

jpsyche


quality posts: 6 Private Messages jpsyche
chrismcclure wrote:Also note the puny little sissy wheels...it's likely you'll have to shovel a spot to start so you can get it going. Definetely not for places like South Dakota. $120 is nice, but just not useful up here



I'm in Northern Illinois, not much farther south than you, and we get lake effect snow on top of the normal snowfall. Now, this year has been pretty light, but we got 22 inches during snowmaggedon, and I (middle-aged woman) had no problem keeping up. It snowed for twenty eight hours, and went out there twice. No problems pushing it at all; the stuff at the foot of the driveway was harder than the rest, but my neighbors struggled with their gas powered models as well, and one whose gas machine never turned over ended up asking to borrow mine when I finished so he could get his car out of his driveway.

tapps


quality posts: 8 Private Messages tapps

protip: don't run over the power cord with the blower.

agentdiscount


quality posts: 1 Private Messages agentdiscount

I have had the older model for 3 winters in Minnesota. It's so lightweight you can easily get through snow banks and deep snow. I actually finish faster than my neighbors with their fancy 2 stage gas snowblowers. Get a long power cord that is winterized (won't be stiff in cold weather and you'll be fine). The chute direction control rod comes off occasionally (on my older model) so maybe build quality isn't great but I swear by the utility of this tool.

Yzzim


quality posts: 4 Private Messages Yzzim

Obviously you've never used one of these. I'm also in Minnesota and my father owns one of these as well as a bigger two stage blower. I'd say he uses this electric blower 75% of the time for those measly snowfalls of less than 4 inches or so. It works great for him.

I've got a gas powered single stage blower and use it much more than my larger two stage.

Not everyone needs a 12hp 28" two stage blower.

L2 wrote:meh.

kind of a mickey mouse type of snowblower, single stage is weak, shoveling small amounts of snow is good for you and easier than using a machine..

if you live where i do and get the amount of snow we get,[minnesota] then you know that only gas powered will help you in the really heavy minnesota winters.

this thing will not move any kind of real amount of snow, that i couldnt do better by hand with a shovel...



khunjeff


quality posts: 20 Private Messages khunjeff

I would be in for one if Woot would send this to an APO address! Right now I use an electric leaf blower to clear powdery snow off my walk in Korea, or a shovel if the snow is too wet...both are slow and somewhat difficult. Would love to buy this puppy

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 548 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

khunjeff wrote:I would be in for one if Woot would send this to an APO address! Right now I use an electric leaf blower to clear powdery snow off my walk in Korea, or a shovel if the snow is too wet...both are slow and somewhat difficult. Would love to buy this puppy

Sorry.



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rocknrollohio


quality posts: 2 Private Messages rocknrollohio

Even though electric snow blowers are not near as good as the gas powered models, this Toro 1800 power curve is consumer reports present top rated electric snow blower

Jay481985


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Jay481985
bluetide wrote:I am looking for a snow blower for quite a while now, gas-powered ones, but they are three times this price. Any suggestions why someone would opt for electric for gas beside the price point? Is it better to spend some more money now to get convenience of having a gas-powered one for the years to come? Any suggestions/comments? Thanks.

edit: one more point, I live in the Midwest/Chicago



My neighbor has a honda gas powered snowblower, that is about the same size. The thing is that remember electric produces the same torque regardless of rpm, while the gas powered one loses torque (hp doesn't matter in snow blowers) when it starts to bog down. So in heavier snow drifts my neighbor's 700 dollar honda bogs and stalls while I have a greenworks that while bogs does not stall.

Jay481985


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Jay481985
SalsaShark42 wrote:Yeah, good luck with this, unless you live in Texas.

It's electric and has no torque, which makes it completely ineffective at handling "wet" snow.

It's also single stage, which means if you get anything more than, say, four inches of snow, this thing will clog.



Actually electric motors produce torque regardless of rpm. It handles wet snow better than my neighbor's Honda snow blower of similar size. I can throw snow plowed dirty snow 4 feet even though its the consistency of a slushie.

Also my greenworks handled 13 inches of snow from nemo just fine.

phlypp


quality posts: 7 Private Messages phlypp

A little more repetition. Bought one for my ladyfriend about 7 years ago in VA. Works quite well in the right conditions, meaning about 6" in lightweight snow with no problem, about 4" in heavy, wet snow with some slogging/clogging. When we're going to have more than 6" (e.g., snowmageddon), she'll do multiple passes, i.e., she'll do a run at the first 6", then another run at the next 6", etc. Will not do icy snow such as that left by a street plow, plan on shoveling that. She's in her 60's and wouldn't be able to handle a gas powered blower but has no problem with this electric model, it can be carried with one hand easily. At the time I bought it, it was the most powerful electric model available and that still seems to be the case.

Be Here Now!

kuma99


quality posts: 9 Private Messages kuma99

electricity + wet = yikes.

This bad-boy pulls 15 amps. That means you ned a real outlet. 3-prong and preferably gfci.

Longer cord ups the amperage requirement

50 foot needs 12 ga cord.

100 feet needs 10 ga cord.

150 feet needs gas blower.

longer the cord, more it draws. Same with wetter snow- it will pull a higher amperage.

Be safe.

cupofworms


quality posts: 2 Private Messages cupofworms

Good luck to anyone who buys this unit.

First off this is a snow thrower, not a snow blower. There is a difference.

I hope you only use it for light, fluffy snow on a sidewalk or back deck. Maybe a light snow on a normal size driveway. And that packed in snow that the plows push to the end of your driveway? You'll burn the motor out trying.

Also, have fun dragging a cord around. I hope it doesn't fall out every 30 seconds for you.

And this entire machine is plastic, its almost a toy.

If you want a REAL snow-blower you should be prepared to spend at least $400-500 on the low end. For $130 you get what you pay for. Cross your fingers.

avante296


quality posts: 1 Private Messages avante296

Alternative: On Amazon there is a similar toy for 20% less with similarly good reviews.
http://www.amazon.com/Snow-Joe-SJ620-13-5-Amp-Electric/dp/B0040X4VBC

I do not have knowledge of either, just noted price dif. and spec similarity.)

hushpuppy20


quality posts: 2 Private Messages hushpuppy20

I'm 32 but I have asthma so this little thrower helps out a lot!

I had the problem with the cord coming unplugged on me, getting wet in the snow, and then I'd be afraid to plug it back in. It might not be the safest thing to do but I've started duct taping the cord to the connector.

With these types of throwers the cord is the most annoying part. Just keep it to your left or right, make sure it unwinds right and get a good color like red that will be visible above the snow.

With a little practice you'll be fine. Don't try it out for the first time with all your neighbors out shoveling and watching/judging you if possible!

bottomfeeder57


quality posts: 3 Private Messages bottomfeeder57

Thera are a lot of good comments posted about the Toro 38381 18-Inch 15 Amp Electric 1800 Power Curve Snow Blower. See the post by Lem for a very good discussion of the different types of snow blowers. This model was the higest rated electric snow blower by Consumer Reports, but it was still not recommended. They judged it poor at snow removal speed, poor at plow pile removal and fair at throwing distance.

For 15 amp device home depot recommends:
Max cord length Gauge
50 ft 14
100 ft 12
150 ft 10
kuma99 sensibly recommends next thickest gauge for each length. You need a cord rated to stay flexible in cold weather and a gfci cord or outlet makes sense in snow and salt.

Two good links to info on required guage by amperage and lnegth of cord:
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/catalog/servlet/ContentView?pn=Extension_Cords_Reels&storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053
http://home.mchsi.com/~gweidner/extension-cords.pdf

nj_diver


quality posts: 0 Private Messages nj_diver
GURABoy wrote:I've seen a lot of snow blowers over the years, but always gas-powered. Anyone have any experience with electric? Decent price, but I have to say I'm skeptical, like I am of electric chainsaws...


========================
Just used a Greenworks electric snow thrower after Nemo dumped about a half a foot on my driveway. It was the first use of it and I also was skeptical but
it did an excellent job.

azzzy


quality posts: 0 Private Messages azzzy

I too live in Chicago (Buffalo Grove). I have one of these. Sorry to be a buzzkill but it's a piece of crap. We bought this back in 2010 just in time for the storm in January of 2011 when we had 2 feet of snow. It was very frustrating. The main problem is that it's not self propelled and you have to push it while simultaneously squeezing the bar that turns on the auger. After the couple of hours that it took me to clear my driveway my hands were all cramped up and my forearms were sore for the next few days. The electric cord constantly gets in the way. And of course it's very weak. Works OK on under 6" of powdery snow but anything over that or wet snow... forget it. Especially wet snow - what a nightmare. This thing doesn't throw wet snow, it drools it. The only advantage this electric blower has it's that it's light and small enough to be put in the laundry room sink for the snow to melt. In every other aspect it's horrible. Finally after 2 very frustrating winters this year we bought a 2-stage gas blower. Of course we didn't have snow for the first 2 months of winter but the last couple of weeks the 2-stage blower got a workout, including wet snow. What a difference. The conclusion - it's a great idea but the implementation is subpar. It's probably better than a shovel but nowhere near as good as a self-propelled gas blower.

bluetide wrote:I am looking for a snow blower for quite a while now, gas-powered ones, but they are three times this price. Any suggestions why someone would opt for electric for gas beside the price point? Is it better to spend some more money now to get convenience of having a gas-powered one for the years to come? Any suggestions/comments? Thanks.

edit: one more point, I live in the Midwest/Chicago



dtscooter59


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dtscooter59

Does anyone know how the blades are constructed? I had the smaller version of this for about 3 hours during Nemo and the plastic holders of the tire material blades broke off while plowing about 3 inches of snow. These blades look better but I can't tell if they are metal or plastic.