WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Singer Sewing Machine and Serger

Speed to First Woot:
14m 34.550s
First Sucker:
EZZeke
Last Wooter to Woot:
twistie801
Last Purchase:
a year ago
Order Pace (rank):
Bottom 27% of Woot.com Woots
Top 47% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Top 30% of Woot.com Woots
Top 25% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

  • 15% first woot
  • 7% second woot
  • 35% < 10 woots
  • 21% < 25 woots
  • 21% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 13% joined today
  • 1% one week old
  • 2% one month old
  • 12% one year old
  • 72% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 99% bought 1
  • 1% bought 2
  • 0% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

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8%
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Woots by State

zero wooters wootinglots of wooters wooting



Quality Posts


wootalyzer


quality posts: 1 Private Messages wootalyzer

Wootalyzer's Pricing Post! - The price of today's woot item is saved here for future reference
------------------------------------------------------------
Singer Sewing Machine and Serger
$399.99 + $5 Standard Shipping
Condition: New

*DISCLAIMER* Wootalyzer! is in no way affiliated with Woot!, and this post may not always be here!

lichme


quality posts: 2607 Private Messages lichme

lstaff


quality posts: 199 Private Messages lstaff

A previous model sold here. and, if i remember correctly, on other sales people really kept saying to wait for the one with the serger.

pgoldberg


quality posts: 4 Private Messages pgoldberg

I bought my wife the serger from home.woot for $150 back in aught-12, and she has used it non-stop. It's a great little machine for doing everything from quick work to complex costumes. She complained about never being able to use other sewing machines because they are too complicated, but she has been able to break this one down, thread, unthread, and rethread without a problem.

aerotim13


quality posts: 0 Private Messages aerotim13

Singer's quality is not what it once was. We bought an expensive Singer quilter a couple years ago, and it works very well, but it needed an $80 repair (re-soldered circuit board) after only a couple months of use. The repair place we took it told us that they stopped carrying the brand because they have had so much trouble with poor manufacturing quality recently.

CuzzinMerl


quality posts: 23 Private Messages CuzzinMerl

A few years ago, I was taken off the work roster and put in a training class for the night. Before the class started, the instructor was talking with some of the guys and I overheard him say that he had a sewing machine and actually liked to sew. Of course, I gave him a hard time about it. Guys don't sew. I was carrying the current issue of Popular Mechanics (a real guys magazine) to read during breaks in the class. On the cover it said: 100 skills every guy should have. Common stuff like how to grill a steak, how to tune a car engine, how to splint a compound fracture. And there it was: #87 How to sew. Well I'll be damned.

I have to admit, I'm sort of an odd size and it's hard to find clothes that fit. If the reviews are good, I might consider this. But then, I would have to take a sewing class.

pete1123


quality posts: 1 Private Messages pete1123

Two things to take note of: drop in bobbin and auto "knot."

Drop in bobbins just don't seem to agree with me (if you think about it, the thread has to make a right angle turn, not a great idea.) Auto knot/tie off features are scary for delicate projects, IMHO. I am unfamiliar with this exact model, but other Singers move back and forth of their own magic to lock a stitch when you start from a stop - something you don't always want to do when sewing... especially basting or decorative work.

conanthelibrarian


quality posts: 3059 Private Messages conanthelibrarian



great reviews (4.9 out of 5.0) on the sewing machine courtesy of overstock.com

http://www.overstock.com/Crafts-Sewing/Singer-Confidence-7470-Computerized-Sewing-Machine-w-225-Stitches/5536249/product.html

Momster


quality posts: 7 Private Messages Momster

I don't need the sewing machine... I would love to have the serger though.

sigh.

coolbreeze


quality posts: 0 Private Messages coolbreeze
CuzzinMerl wrote:A few years ago, I was taken off the work roster and put in a training class for the night. Before the class started, the instructor was talking with some of the guys and I overheard him say that he had a sewing machine and actually liked to sew. Of course, I gave him a hard time about it. Guys don't sew. I was carrying the current issue of Popular Mechanics (a real guys magazine) to read during breaks in the class. On the cover it said: 100 skills every guy should have. Common stuff like how to grill a steak, how to tune a car engine, how to splint a compound fracture. And there it was: #87 How to sew. Well I'll be damned.

I have to admit, I'm sort of an odd size and it's hard to find clothes that fit. If the reviews are good, I might consider this. But then, I would have to take a sewing class.



And that means you'd have to wear a mask.

coolbreeze


quality posts: 0 Private Messages coolbreeze

What the hell is a "serger"?

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 539 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

Momster wrote:I don't need the sewing machine... I would love to have the serger though.

sigh.



Craigslist the sewing machine.



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note2001


quality posts: 25 Private Messages note2001

Is woot allowed to sell torture devices now? Sure, they're disguised as handy dandy sewing helpers, but have you ever tried to thread one of these buggers? One word: bobbin.

<<<...runs away screaming>>

almirar


quality posts: 7 Private Messages almirar
CuzzinMerl wrote:A few years ago, I was taken off the work roster and put in a training class for the night. Before the class started, the instructor was talking with some of the guys and I overheard him say that he had a sewing machine and actually liked to sew. Of course, I gave him a hard time about it. Guys don't sew. I was carrying the current issue of Popular Mechanics (a real guys magazine) to read during breaks in the class. On the cover it said: 100 skills every guy should have. Common stuff like how to grill a steak, how to tune a car engine, how to splint a compound fracture. And there it was: #87 How to sew. Well I'll be damned.

I have to admit, I'm sort of an odd size and it's hard to find clothes that fit. If the reviews are good, I might consider this. But then, I would have to take a sewing class.



Sewing isn't complicated - buy a pattern to make an apron and some material- follow the directions and you can teach yourself to sew! When you get stuck, google for an answer- enjoy!

neuropsychosocial


quality posts: 171 Private Messages neuropsychosocial

I bought the previous(?) version of this Singer sewing machine and serger in August 2011. I grew up using a sewing machine to sew clothes from scratch; this is the third machine that I've owned. It is so complicated that even basic repairs or simple projects become a chore. There are a zillion different options, many of them automated, but it's a pain to use the manual to look up the right stitch number for a particular fabric, fuss with the LCD screen and electronic controls, etc. When I want to make curtains, it's easier to use a Hello Kitty machine that I got at Target on clearance for $10 and manually adjust the tension.

I suspect these are fantastic machines. I suspect if I had the time and flexibility to spend a few weekends really getting to know them, I would think they're amazing. I do not have the time to re-learn how to use a sewing machine and I was surprised to find the machine unusable by someone familiar with non-electronic sewing machines.

I am not recommending against these machines. I am saying: (1) this is a lot of machine (2) if you know how to use a non-electronic machine, be prepared that there's a learning curve that you may or may not find worthwhile in comparison to buying a less automated/simpler machine.

RIP A.A. Blanks (Obituary)

almirar


quality posts: 7 Private Messages almirar
note2001 wrote:Is woot allowed to sell torture devices now? Sure, they're disguised as handy dandy sewing helpers, but have you ever tried to thread one of these buggers? One word: bobbin.

<<<...runs away screaming>>



The new machines thread instantly with a threading device- when I showed my friend she was so amazed at how modern technology had solved a Giant Sewing Problem, that she went out and bought a new machine!!!

almirar


quality posts: 7 Private Messages almirar
neuropsychosocial wrote:I bought the previous(?) version of this Singer sewing machine and serger in August 2011. I grew up using a sewing machine to sew clothes from scratch; this is the third machine that I've owned. It is so complicated that even basic repairs or simple projects become a chore. There are a zillion different options, many of them automated, but it's a pain to use the manual to look up the right stitch number for a particular fabric, fuss with the LCD screen and electronic controls, etc. When I want to make curtains, it's easier to use a Hello Kitty machine that I got at Target on clearance for $10 and manually adjust the tension.

I suspect these are fantastic machines. I suspect if I had the time and flexibility to spend a few weekends really getting to know them, I would think they're amazing. I do not have the time to re-learn how to use a sewing machine and I was surprised to find the machine unusable by someone familiar with non-electronic sewing machines.

I am not recommending against these machines. I am saying: (1) this is a lot of machine (2) if you know how to use a non-electronic machine, be prepared that there's a learning curve that you may or may not find worthwhile in comparison to buying a less automated/simpler machine.



Sergers are complicated, and unless you plan on using it, just getting a regular machine is best! I've been sewing for 50some years and have no desire to own a serger- a regular machine will zigzag- that's all the serging I will ever need.

seattlekleins


quality posts: 8 Private Messages seattlekleins

Via the missus:

This is a very good machine, but probably not such a great first sewing machine.

Pros:

Can do a whole lot, most of it very well.

Can handle lots of fabrics well, up to and including making jeans that fit perfectly.

Fairly intuitive controls overall, once you learn them.

Cons:

Singer has had a few problems lately. Wifey hasn't personally had any issues with hers, but you may find some complaints on sewing forums.

RTFM. Seriously. There's enough to this machine that it really is worth your time to read the manual cover-to-cover, and to spend some time just fiddling.

TL;DR: Good machine if you know what you're doing and read the manual.

clarkbhm


quality posts: 19 Private Messages clarkbhm

"And Betsy Ross used to sit home and sew, and sew, and sew..."

And so, by some extraordinary coincidence, fate, it seemed, had decided that Brad and Janet should keep that appointment with their friend, Dr. Everett Scott.

fishermanswife


quality posts: 6 Private Messages fishermanswife

The description and the comments almost makes me wish I had time to sew again.

hvac1000


quality posts: 2 Private Messages hvac1000

Stablenut


quality posts: 3 Private Messages Stablenut
almirar wrote:Sergers are complicated, and unless you plan on using it, just getting a regular machine is best! I've been sewing for 50some years and have no desire to own a serger- a regular machine will zigzag- that's all the serging I will ever need.



You're really missing out. Sergers cut and make a rolled hem at the same time - which is very nice for tablecloths, napkins, curtains, anything you'd like a rolled hem on. We have made so many tablecloths; it's really fun to do. A stetchy-stitch hem for shortening t-shirts (for us shorties), or hemming jeans - the hemming stitch is great. Sergers open a whole new world of sewing.

catherinemcclarey


quality posts: 2 Private Messages catherinemcclarey
ThunderThighs wrote:Craigslist the sewing machine.


Or eBay it - I do that with unwanted printers from Best Buy's computer package deals all the time. ;)
Agreed with other posters that this combo may be too much machine for first-time (or LONG time since the last time) machine sewers. I bought a fairly simple Janome from a local dealer last year (after describing my experience level to a former home ec teacher there). I could have bought a Singer or Brother machine with lots more bells & whistles from the local Walmart - but I was going for build quality, ease of use, and dealer-provided support services. (Maybe I'll finally find some time to use it once my youngest graduates from high school this year! ;( )

alamogal1963


quality posts: 1 Private Messages alamogal1963
CuzzinMerl wrote:

I have to admit, I'm sort of an odd size and it's hard to find clothes that fit. If the reviews are good, I might consider this. But then, I would have to take a sewing class.



Sewing is an invaluable skill. I saved hundreds of dollars over 20 years of active service sewing patches on my military uniforms myself. So yes, you should learn. To save the guy's humiliation of a classroom environment full of hens, try Craftsy.com. It's like being in a classroom in your kitchen. You'll learn A to Z for beginners and there's even a sewing class for odd sizes.

Blondes aren't dumm.

alamogal1963


quality posts: 1 Private Messages alamogal1963

As for the Singer quality, I concur with previous postings. I bought a Singer machine for my DIL after my grandson was born and thankfully it was from a store because as I was showing her the features of the machine, I dropped the feed dogs (like for sewing on a button) and they wouldn't come back up. We returned it and the Singer display model had the same problem. So I bought her a Brother and she hasn't had a bit of trouble with it. If you want an awesome machine, the Brother C6000i is just $179 on Amazon. I've had mine for 4 years and no trouble at all after hundreds of hours of sewing & quilting. It doesn't have the alpha-numeric embroidery stitches, but does everything else superbly.

Blondes aren't dumm.

roaringflamecat


quality posts: 0 Private Messages roaringflamecat
coolbreeze wrote:What the hell is a "serger"?



A surger uses multipule threads to put together peices. Also it cuts off the excess fabaric as it does so. Easiest way to spot a surger stitch is in the sleeves of sweaters/hoodies (Like a curly q wraping around the edge of the fabric.) or at the bottom of t-shirts, where there are two stitches in a row. (like ===== on the front of the shirt but WWWWW on the inside.)

A surger and a sewing machine are like a microwave and oven, both do the same thing, but one might be better than the other for some things.

kreamchees


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kreamchees
Momster wrote:I don't need the sewing machine... I would love to have the serger though.

sigh.



I agree. Have two sewing machines and would love a serger.

wootenator


quality posts: 1 Private Messages wootenator
coolbreeze wrote:What the hell is a "serger"?



It seems like a great thing whatever it is.

bblhed


quality posts: 6 Private Messages bblhed
Momster wrote:I don't need the sewing machine... I would love to have the serger though.

sigh.



I'm in the same boat, and I really don't want to deal with selling a sewing machine. I guess I will have to wait for the serger to show up on woot! alone.

bigbigblake


quality posts: 1 Private Messages bigbigblake

100 dollars cheaper on amazon?

http://www.amazon.com/SINGER-Confidence-225-Stitch-Computerized-Machine/dp/B00176WYGY

Sorry, why are people wooting this?


[MOD: You're missing half the deal? You get both here.]

dlseek


quality posts: 1 Private Messages dlseek
bigbigblake wrote:100 dollars cheaper on amazon?

http://www.amazon.com/SINGER-Confidence-225-Stitch-Computerized-Machine/dp/B00176WYGY

Sorry, why are people wooting this?



This Woot deal comes with another separate machine called a "serger". Your amazon deal is just the sewing machine part. The serger seems to sell for $170-$200.

So it looks like this deal is about $70 cheaper for those that need a sewing machine and a serger.

mmccallum28


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mmccallum28
bigbigblake wrote:100 dollars cheaper on amazon?

http://www.amazon.com/SINGER-Confidence-225-Stitch-Computerized-Machine/dp/B00176WYGY

Sorry, why are people wooting this?



This one comes with a serger as well as the sewing machine.

0ldeag1e


quality posts: 0 Private Messages 0ldeag1e
bigbigblake wrote:100 dollars cheaper on amazon?

http://www.amazon.com/SINGER-Confidence-225-Stitch-Computerized-Machine/dp/B00176WYGY

Sorry, why are people wooting this?



That's JUST the sewing machine; the serger, not available on Amazon right now, seems to run $150+ extra.

jlfpixie


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jlfpixie
bigbigblake wrote:100 dollars cheaper on amazon?

http://www.amazon.com/SINGER-Confidence-225-Stitch-Computerized-Machine/dp/B00176WYGY

Sorry, why are people wooting this?



You're looking at the price for the sewing machine only. Now go look up the price to add on the Serger. It's a decent deal...

tigriss7


quality posts: 2 Private Messages tigriss7
pete1123 wrote:Two things to take note of: drop in bobbin and auto "knot."

Drop in bobbins just don't seem to agree with me (if you think about it, the thread has to make a right angle turn, not a great idea.) Auto knot/tie off features are scary for delicate projects, IMHO. I am unfamiliar with this exact model, but other Singers move back and forth of their own magic to lock a stitch when you start from a stop - something you don't always want to do when sewing... especially basting or decorative work.



Think about how you wind the top thread around and about. It too makes 90 degree turns with no problem. A drop in bobbin is usually drop and go with automatic top feeding. As for the knot, the knot is great for delicate work and decorative stitches. It really isn't a knot to speak of, but a small set of stitches that are taken all in one spot, usually 3 rather than back tacking and messing up your design. The knot feature is automatic on designs and a traditional back tack optional for straight and zig zag stitches. I've got a collection of some 14 plus antique machines from hand crank to treadle to awesome mid-century turquoise, white and chrom. I have three pink ones. They are all mechanical and oscillating bobbins. My three newest are drop ins, made in the last 10 years, and work just as great, but I did not buy a Singer in any of them. I have antique Singers, including a 401A, and they work great, but are a ton to move. These modern ones are Singer only in name. They are good for learning and light weight work of normal fabric thickness. For most people they would do great, but I quilt, do home decor, and clothing repair that these new Singers can not handle much of. Consider what you are wanting a machine for and buy based on those needs. This one is well beyond the basics with all the decorative stitches, but will do some pretty things for basic decor of clothing and putting your kid's names on their things. It is a good starting point, price wise, with the serger as well that runs around $190 seperate. I too perfer a basic serger that does not need lots of tinkering to thread. I have a set of fine nosed tweezers I use for threading in all the loops.

pazarcone


quality posts: 1 Private Messages pazarcone

Does anyone know if it has a bolt hole in the bottom so I can mount it to a sewing table?
Not all sewing machines do and it's usually not advertized on the box (or even sometimes in the specs).

bigbigblake


quality posts: 1 Private Messages bigbigblake
mmccallum28 wrote:This one comes with a serger as well as the sewing machine.



Makes a lot more sense. I thought the serger was just a feature on the sewing machine, not an actual additional machine.

mrglenasmith


quality posts: 3 Private Messages mrglenasmith
CuzzinMerl wrote:...Guys don't sew. I was carrying the current issue of Popular Mechanics (a real guys magazine) to read during breaks in the class. On the cover it said: 100 skills every guy should have. Common stuff like how to grill a steak, how to tune a car engine, how to splint a compound fracture. And there it was: #87 How to sew. Well I'll be damned.
...



I'm with Pop Mech on this one. I'm a Dude, and while I don't spend weekends sewing my own clothes, my parents did gift me a sewing machine when I couldn't keep my Moms old one running anymore, as well as the knowledge to use it. (Thanks Mom!) I've made curtains, bedspreads, dust ruffles to match the bedspreads and so on. As well as mending clothes and sewing patches on Brownie vests for my Daughters. It's kind of cool to hear my Grrls tell friends who come over for sleepovers "My Daddy made this. Bunkbed, bedspread, curtains, he made it." It's cheaper than buying pre-made, and you can customize to fit your own particular needs.

Sewing is a lot like working with wood, you just need to visualize how the parts go together. Scissors instead of saws, sewing instead of glue, nails and screws. I often use my drywall square to help cut fabric straight and square.

I'd probably use the serger, but can't justify the cost. Although, we have already bought the fabric for new drapes over the sliding patio door...

Glen