thelocker


quality posts: 2 Private Messages thelocker
coolbreeze wrote:And that means you'd have to wear a mask.



Just to clairify, guys don't use sewing machines. Guys use the heck out of bench-top-thread -injectors. I personally make all sorts of crazy outdoor stuff with my Bernina 1010. My wife can barely put a button back on.

BelyndaG


quality posts: 19 Private Messages BelyndaG

We have an old wooden boat we are restoring and have been looking for both a sewing machine and serger so we can do our own canvas work. My last sewing machine bit the dust after DH used it to repair sails for a sailboat we had at the time, so we've been looking for a good deal on machines that would do heavy duty work. I can't find any references in the product descriptions or any of the links provided (thanks lichme and whatsamattaU!) that would let me know if these machines could handle that kind of work. Does anyone know?

sensenigk


quality posts: 8 Private Messages sensenigk

This looks like a great deal. But since I got this for $43 yesterday, I don't really need it so much anymore.



Well...maybe just the serger.

kittybooboo04


quality posts: 4 Private Messages kittybooboo04

Just like the others...Wish they were separate. Would love to have a serger on sale, Been looking for one on craigslist and other garage sale sites. no luck

BelyndaG


quality posts: 19 Private Messages BelyndaG
sensenigk wrote:This looks like a great deal. But since I got this for $43 yesterday, I don't really need it so much anymore.



Well...maybe just the serger.



Now THAT'S the kind of sewing machine I need! Seriously! Some boating folks insist that the old gear driven machines like that one are the best for sewing heavy canvas!

dessary


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dessary

Do not get a Singer serger. I have been using sergers for many years. The best is Janome or Juki. dont waster your maoney on any singer product!! They do not have the quality any more. Take it from one who has used many!! Jamome sergers are great and decently priced. Janome machines are awesome and also fairly priced.

Deborah Essary

dessary


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dessary

This sewing machine cannot pull that task. The serger will not either. For heavy duty sewing look for that very phrase when shopping "heavy duty" The janome brands will definitely handle, sail and duck cloth, as well as vinyl. some light weight lethers as well. Do not get a singer product and expect strength. they do not make them like they used to!!!

Deborah Essary

CuzzinMerl


quality posts: 24 Private Messages CuzzinMerl
alamogal1963 wrote:Sewing is an invaluable skill. I saved hundreds of dollars over 20 years of active service sewing patches on my military uniforms myself. So yes, you should learn. To save the guy's humiliation of a classroom environment full of hens, try Craftsy.com. It's like being in a classroom in your kitchen. You'll learn A to Z for beginners and there's even a sewing class for odd sizes.



Thanks for the advice. After I posted my comment above, I remembered that I'm not an absolute novice when it comes to sewing. By trade I'm an aircraft mechanic. Twenty years ago while I was overhauling 737s, work got kinda slow one summer but in the backshops it was beginning to stack up. So they asked for volunteers to do a 6-week stint in the backshops to help them catch up. I figured what the heck, why not? We didn't get to choose which shop we worked in and I was terrified that they would stick me in the shop where they cleaned the toilets, so I guess I got lucky when I was assigned to sew insulation blankets. It was about the most menial work you could find--once you got used to the commercial sewing machine. It was operated by a foot pedal, of course and it took a bit of practise to get the feel for it. You would press down a little and nothing happened. A little more, and still nothing. Just a little bit more and then the thing really took off and tried to suck you into the machine! You definitely wanted to stay out of the line of fire or you would end up stitching your fingers together or something. Once you got the hang of it though, it was kinda fun. I enjoyed my 6 weeks.


Incidentally, in Seattle they say you haven't had enough coffee unless you can thread a sewing machine while it's running! -- Jeff Bezos

notsomuch


quality posts: 7 Private Messages notsomuch

One More Friday Gone I want to jump on this SO BADLY but I just impulse bought a DPMS LR .308 AR-10 and a Mossberg 500 Tactical... What's a girl to DO??

Once you go Mac, you never go back.

subether


quality posts: 4 Private Messages subether

Another one in the 'sewing is for guys' camp. I managed to coerce my basic machine to hem curtains and do minor repairs on my clothes.

Alas, I won't get getting these- I've got a servicable machine, and if I need a serger I'll borrow my mother's when she's not makeing quilts.

ninosgirl


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ninosgirl

i bought this 2 christmas' ago for my daughter in law - she is a sewer and wanted this - it was a great price - i believe i paid the same as 2 years ago so inflation hasnt marked it up and it was a must have for her - she has 3 other machines and these 2 were added to her collection - excellent buy - check on amazon for the prices and you will see what a good bargin it is

giolee88


quality posts: 16 Private Messages giolee88

Will the Singer 7470 handle 3-layer denim, such as a simple hem job on a pair of jeans? Please assume the correct needle, and correct thread, and a competent experienced user.

ninosgirl


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ninosgirl
dessary wrote:Do not get a Singer serger. I have been using sergers for many years. The best is Janome or Juki. dont waster your maoney on any singer product!! They do not have the quality any more. Take it from one who has used many!! Jamome sergers are great and decently priced. Janome machines are awesome and also fairly priced.



i purchased this for my daughter in law 2 xmas' ago - she has not had a problem with it - different machines for different uses. she too has a juki as well as 2 other machines - depends on what she is sewing but she had wanted these 2 machines and that is what she got - like i said depends on what you are sewing - for basic sewing this is fine

ttcarter


quality posts: 7 Private Messages ttcarter

This is a good deal for someone who wants/needs a sewing machine AND a serger. Both are budget machines, but they have some nice features. I have a Singer serger from a combo I bought here before and it works fine. Noisy, though. (I gave the sewing machine to a new mom who wanted to learn to sew and she loves it.)

If you just want a serger, consider this Brother on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Brother-1034D-Thread-Threading-Differential/dp/B0000CBK1L/ref=sr_1_1?s=arts-crafts&ie=UTF8&qid=1361210241&sr=1-1&keywords=brother+serger
I own it also and it stitches beautifully and is relatively easy to thread and is a better quality serger.

If you are new to sewing and considering this woot, my best tips for dealing with stitch problems (most common complaint from new sewists) are:
1. re-thread your machine from scratch, paying careful attention to the threading diagram
2. change your needle, making sure it is the right size and style for the fabric your are sewing. A dull needle or one that is the wrong size makes terrible stitches.
3. keep the bobbin area and the bobbin race clean. Bits of lint, fuzz and thread that collect there will cause stitch problems.
Those 3 things will fix 90% of the stitching problems you encounter.

ttcarter


quality posts: 7 Private Messages ttcarter
dessary wrote:Do not get a Singer serger. I have been using sergers for many years. The best is Janome or Juki. dont waster your maoney on any singer product!! They do not have the quality any more. Take it from one who has used many!! Jamome sergers are great and decently priced. Janome machines are awesome and also fairly priced.

I agree that some sergers (and sewing machines) are just crap. But you have to look much closer than just name brand because it's common practice for the same machine to be sold under different brand names. For example, I have a Euro-Pro serger (not a particularly great brand name) which was also sold under the Babylock and Juki brand name (both excellent brand names). It is exactly the same fantastic serger made in the same factory, but is much less expensive when sold under the Euro-Pro brand. It pays to Google any machine you are considering.



ttcarter


quality posts: 7 Private Messages ttcarter
BelyndaG wrote:We have an old wooden boat we are restoring and have been looking for both a sewing machine and serger so we can do our own canvas work. My last sewing machine bit the dust after DH used it to repair sails for a sailboat we had at the time, so we've been looking for a good deal on machines that would do heavy duty work. I can't find any references in the product descriptions or any of the links provided (thanks lichme and whatsamattaU!) that would let me know if these machines could handle that kind of work. Does anyone know?


No, these machines would not hold up to the task of sewing yards of heavy canvas. You will need to get a commercial/industrial sewing machine. There are usually lots of good used ones on Craig's List in the $400 range.

giolee88


quality posts: 16 Private Messages giolee88
ttcarter wrote:No, these machines would not hold up to the task of sewing yards of heavy canvas. You will need to get a commercial/industrial sewing machine. There are usually lots of good used ones on Craig's List in the $400 range.



How's about the occasional job of hemming 3-layer denim? Most of the time, all we care about is the fact that alot of kids clothing are too fat at the waist for our bone skinny rug rats, or our hand-me-down pants are a bit too long. Most of the time, we just want an easy option to run the waist band through the machine real quick, or hem up the pant leg. But alot of times, it's heavier fabric like denim, or khakis. Is the Singer 7470 up to the occasional job of 3-layer denim (hemming up the pant legs), or 4-layers of heavy cotton twill (tucking a the waistband on a pair of khakis), or 4-layers of knit cotton & elastic (tucking the waistband on a pair of sweats)? 80% of the time, this is the extent of our sewing needs. We're not looking to make works of art. We're just happy to have things fit the boys.

ttcarter


quality posts: 7 Private Messages ttcarter
giolee88 wrote:How's about the occasional job of hemming 3-layer denim? Most of the time, all we care about is the fact that alot of kids clothing are too fat at the waist for our bone skinny rug rats, or our hand-me-down pants are a bit too long. Most of the time, we just want an easy option to run the waist band through the machine real quick, or hem up the pant leg. But alot of times, it's heavier fabric like denim, or khakis. Is the Singer 7470 up to the occasional job of 3-layer denim (hemming up the pant legs), or 4-layers of heavy cotton twill (tucking a the waistband on a pair of khakis), or 4-layers of knit cotton & elastic (tucking the waistband on a pair of sweats)? 80% of the time, this is the extent of our sewing needs. We're not looking to make works of art. We're just happy to have things fit the boys.


Yes, you can hem jeans and sew multiple layers on this sewing machine. It just won't handle daily sewing of heavy weight fabric.

Make sure you install a denim (or jeans weight) needle and use the heavier thread available for sewing jeans. Stitch slowly and use a commercially available "jean-a-ma-jig" or a folded piece of cardboard to support the presser foot in the back when going over the hump where the seams intersect. Also, a wonderful secret that makes all the difference is to fold up your hem, pin it in place, then pound the hem (especially on the intersecting seams) with a hammer before sewing. It makes it so much easier to sew. I learned this from a person who designs fashion jeans.

310susanf


quality posts: 1 Private Messages 310susanf

Love the Woot but this machine is for sale New on ebay for $198.95 + free shipping.

tyrsa


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tyrsa
ttcarter wrote:I agree that some sergers (and sewing machines) are just crap. But you have to look much closer than just name brand because it's common practice for the same machine to be sold under different brand names. For example, I have a Euro-Pro serger (not a particularly great brand name) which was also sold under the Babylock and Juki brand name (both excellent brand names). It is exactly the same fantastic serger made in the same factory, but is much less expensive when sold under the Euro-Pro brand. It pays to Google any machine you are considering.



I'll second that recommendation, do your homework! And if you want some good reviews of various (even vintage) machines, try sewing.patternreview.com

Personally I bought a Kenmore machine about a year and a half ago, and as with all Kenmore items, it was rebranded - from Janome. The equivalent Janome branded machine cost twice as much. Sadly it seems Sears has stopped carrying sewing machines, but I am glad I researched and was able to determine the Janome model #, etc for parts and repair purposes. I learned to sew on my mother's Singer Athena 2000, but from what I have heard (and seen at local shops) their quality is way down and I was not willing to spend for the name alone. I see a lot of Singers come up at places like overstock and tuesday morning, which cant be a great sign.
Very happy with my "Janome" though.

tyrsa


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tyrsa
310susanf wrote:Love the Woot but this machine is for sale New on ebay for $198.95 + free shipping.



This is two machines, not just the one.

ginawoot


quality posts: 17 Private Messages ginawoot
sensenigk wrote:



My grandmother had this (or a very similar) model, and could whip up just about any article of clothing on a moment's notice. She made fancy things like pleated skirts and fitted blouses, but I recall particularly a hooded terrycloth bathrobe that I loved and wore until it was falling apart.

CuzzinMerl


quality posts: 24 Private Messages CuzzinMerl
ttcarter wrote:Also, a wonderful secret that makes all the difference is to fold up your hem, pin it in place, then pound the hem (especially on the intersecting seams) with a hammer before sewing. It makes it so much easier to sew. I learned this from a person who designs fashion jeans.



Here's another trick I learned: Almost every dry cleaner will do minor alterations.

bigapplebookworm


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bigapplebookworm
ttcarter wrote:No, these machines would not hold up to the task of sewing yards of heavy canvas. You will need to get a commercial/industrial sewing machine. There are usually lots of good used ones on Craig's List in the $400 range.



Would you please suggest any commercial models?

bigapplebookworm

eeners


quality posts: 2 Private Messages eeners
almirar wrote:Sewing isn't complicated - buy a pattern to make an apron and some material- follow the directions and you can teach yourself to sew! When you get stuck, google for an answer- enjoy!



One of my favorite episodes of Duck Dynasty was Uncle Si taking over the ladies and sewing some mean aprons ;).

ttcarter


quality posts: 7 Private Messages ttcarter
bigapplebookworm wrote:Would you please suggest any commercial models?

I wish I could but I have no personal experience with commercial sewing machines except having sewn on a couple of them. They are different in that they generally only do a straight stitch and perhaps a zig zag. They have an oil pan type set-up which lubricates the motor constantly and the motor is separate from the sewing head.

They are big and heavy, but are the only answer for heavy duty sewing like canvas sails.

A friend of mine bought a used one on Craig's list for doing car upholstery work and the person she bought it from showed her how to use it and maintain it.

BelyndaG


quality posts: 19 Private Messages BelyndaG
ttcarter wrote:I wish I could but I have no personal experience with commercial sewing machines except having sewn on a couple of them. They are different in that they generally only do a straight stitch and perhaps a zig zag. They have an oil pan type set-up which lubricates the motor constantly and the motor is separate from the sewing head.

They are big and heavy, but are the only answer for heavy duty sewing like canvas sails.

A friend of mine bought a used one on Craig's list for doing car upholstery work and the person she bought it from showed her how to use it and maintain it.



Thanks. We've been told that even the older machines (like the antique pictured above) are better for heavy fabrics because they are gear-driven.

I had a Kenmore machine with very few bells and whistles that I bought in (dare I admit it) 1981. It worked like a charm while I was making maternity clothes and kids clothes and lasted for years until DH took it upon himself to repair some sails WITHOUT asking me for help. I came home to find that it hadn't occured to him to adjust the tension, use an appropriate needle, etc. We paid $80 to get it repaired (the tension was a mess!) and have only used it for light sewing but it has never been the same. The tension problem has gotten worse and the thread just knots up into a jumble under the pressure foot.

Personally, if I were just going to do some regular sewing like I used to do I would go for this deal. I would enjoy some bells and whistles this time around. Unfortunately, my main need is for the heavy duty work so I guess I need to look for a used machine that will do that. And a serger, too, dang it! It will still be less expensive that paying someone else to make and repair all of our canvas. Urgh!

giolee88


quality posts: 16 Private Messages giolee88
ttcarter wrote:Yes, you can hem jeans and sew multiple layers on this sewing machine. It just won't handle daily sewing of heavy weight fabric.

Make sure you install a denim (or jeans weight) needle and use the heavier thread available for sewing jeans. Stitch slowly and use a commercially available "jean-a-ma-jig" or a folded piece of cardboard to support the presser foot in the back when going over the hump where the seams intersect. Also, a wonderful secret that makes all the difference is to fold up your hem, pin it in place, then pound the hem (especially on the intersecting seams) with a hammer before sewing. It makes it so much easier to sew. I learned this from a person who designs fashion jeans.



Thanks for the feedback. We've a basic Bernina and a three-thread serger. Not particularly beefy, and tough to get through the heavier things. It would be nice to get the added flexibility of the 4-thread serger, and a machine that has some modern electronic features like monogramming. In for one.

ttcarter


quality posts: 7 Private Messages ttcarter
BelyndaG wrote:Thanks. We've been told that even the older machines (like the antique pictured above) are better for heavy fabrics because they are gear-driven.

I had a Kenmore machine with very few bells and whistles that I bought in (dare I admit it) 1981. It worked like a charm while I was making maternity clothes and kids clothes and lasted for years until DH took it upon himself to repair some sails WITHOUT asking me for help. I came home to find that it hadn't occured to him to adjust the tension, use an appropriate needle, etc. We paid $80 to get it repaired (the tension was a mess!) and have only used it for light sewing but it has never been the same. The tension problem has gotten worse and the thread just knots up into a jumble under the pressure foot.

Personally, if I were just going to do some regular sewing like I used to do I would go for this deal. I would enjoy some bells and whistles this time around. Unfortunately, my main need is for the heavy duty work so I guess I need to look for a used machine that will do that. And a serger, too, dang it! It will still be less expensive that paying someone else to make and repair all of our canvas. Urgh!

I'm impressed at your restraint with regard to your husband! LOL (I'm assuming he's still breathing.) Yes, I would say that most domestic sewing machines made from 1960 on just aren't built to handle sustained, heavy duty work. And even if you manage to get through a project with one, they are never the same afterward.

I've been itching to buy an industrial machine myself and I pore over Craig's List ads every week. Good luck in finding just the right machine for your sails.

ttcarter


quality posts: 7 Private Messages ttcarter
giolee88 wrote:Thanks for the feedback. We've a basic Bernina and a three-thread serger. Not particularly beefy, and tough to get through the heavier things. It would be nice to get the added flexibility of the 4-thread serger, and a machine that has some modern electronic features like monogramming. In for one.

Woo hoo! I hope you are delighted with this combo. Post back afterward with your thoughts about both machines.

I hate to tell you but machine embroidery is a certified addiction! It starts innocently enough with a machine that will do the odd monogram, but soon you're needing more. Just FYI, when your growing addiction demands to be fed, the Brother SE-400 provides a lot of bang for your buck. http://www.amazon.com/Brother-SE400-Combination-Computerized-Embroidery/dp/B003AVMZA4/ref=cm_cr-mr-title

BelyndaG


quality posts: 19 Private Messages BelyndaG
ttcarter wrote:I'm impressed at your restraint with regard to your husband! LOL (I'm assuming he's still breathing.)



I tell people all the time that if you ever call my house and DH answers, breathing hard, it's not because we were exercising or having wild sex, it's just because I didn't hold the pillow down long enough!

misskellycc


quality posts: 0 Private Messages misskellycc
tyrsa wrote:This is two machines, not just the one.



I bought the woot because 1) my sewing machine is not that great and 2) both machines on the woot cost $50 more than the sewing machine alone and 3) when I tried to buy a rolled-hem plate for my serger, the sales guy says "they don't make 'em anymore, maybe you should buy *this* serger" ($7K model). Yeah, right.

mavjade


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mavjade

Arrgghh...

They had this deal about a year and a half ago and I had just moved and didn't yet have a job so I couldn't afford it. I've been waiting for it to come back up and 3 months ago I finally gave up and bought a sewing machine and then this happens! :'(

Hopefully the serger itself will come up at some point.

mandophoto3


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mandophoto3
ttcarter wrote:Yes, you can hem jeans and sew multiple layers on this sewing machine. It just won't handle daily sewing of heavy weight fabric.

Make sure you install a denim (or jeans weight) needle and use the heavier thread available for sewing jeans. Stitch slowly and use a commercially available "jean-a-ma-jig" or a folded piece of cardboard to support the presser foot in the back when going over the hump where the seams intersect. Also, a wonderful secret that makes all the difference is to fold up your hem, pin it in place, then pound the hem (especially on the intersecting seams) with a hammer before sewing. It makes it so much easier to sew. I learned this from a person who designs fashion jeans.



I have never heard of a jean-a-ma-jig and I love this hammering tip! I don't sew denim often but I imagine both of these things would help with thick seams in purses and bags that I make. I'm starting to be really glad I ordered this woot! (first time wooter)

thegreatgilbert


quality posts: 0 Private Messages thegreatgilbert
pazarcone wrote:Does anyone know if it has a bolt hole in the bottom so I can mount it to a sewing table?
Not all sewing machines do and it's usually not advertized on the box (or even sometimes in the specs).



I bought this about a year and a half ago. Mine does not.

thegreatgilbert


quality posts: 0 Private Messages thegreatgilbert

I bought this combine deal last time it was offered, about a year and a half ago. I have used it extensively. It is not the same quality as the Singer machines your mom used, that's true. Most of the internal components are plastic. That said, it's much cheaper than the $800 Husquarvana I drooled over. I did have a problem in the first month or two with a tension component, but since it comes with a long warranty I took it to the local authorized repair shop and they fixed it for free. Register your products!!

I have made many garments, curtains, quilts, etc. with this set and for the price it's a good deal.

Gnomercy


quality posts: 12 Private Messages Gnomercy

You can use a Euro Hem to avoid having to stitch through all the layers of the hem.

Found this tutorial for you

http://www.denimblog.com/2009/05/how-to-hem-your-jeans-with-the-original-hem-2/


_____________________________
I woot, therefore I am.

.

aloris


quality posts: 0 Private Messages aloris
Sewing is a lot like working with wood, you just need to visualize how the parts go together. Scissors instead of saws, sewing instead of glue, nails and screws. I often use my drywall square to help cut fabric straight and square.



hahaha, I use a carpenter's square as well. My dad does a lot of handy-work around the house and carpentry is one of them. Bought one at Home Depot and I use it strictly for sewing. Hubby is not allowed to touch it and I told him if he wants one to go get one or I'll buy him one...but he is restricted from making my sewing one "dirty".

And TTCarter...I agree with pretty much everything you've posted. Absolutely on all points!

Although, I did buy the Singer Sewing & Serger Perfect Finish Combo in August 2011. The machines still work fine, but the creation of jeans/hemming jeans...the sewing machine just doesn't have the power to do it. I've also tried crafting a heavy grilling apron out of canvas...not a good project for this machine.

Also, my drop in bobbin works great...but the plastic cover that protects the bobbin no longer stays in place without tape. If I don't tape it...the plastic piece will pop up in the middle of sewing.

The monograms/lettering and stitches are simply to work with when it comes to the LCD screen...very user friendly, IMO. Doesn't take much to learn them...and yes, totally addictive.

My machines are mainly used for Ren Faire garb and the creation of clothes, generally speaking--maternity clothes, shirts, and home decor. Works fabulous with super light fabrics...but not so much on the heavy stuff. The "hammer jeans down the seams" is brilliant....why haven't I been using it!?! I will from now on!

As for the serger...they [this one and the Perfect Finish combo serger] look exactly the same in the pictures and the specs. I really wouldn't be surprised if this particular serger is the same Perfect Finish serger with another name printed on it.

My serger does beautiful rolled hems (provided the tension is set correctly), and the reason I bought this combo pack as well is because I wanted to have 2 sergers...1 dedicated on 4 threads and 1 for 3 threads. I make lots of napkins and and table cloths on my mom's request and it's such a pain to remove/replace needle when necessary to go back to my own projects.

Essentially...if you have light stuff to do and you maintain your machines, these will be perfect for you. If your projects are heavier in nature, go with what everybody else is saying: heavier duty machines...Brother makes a fabulous brand (but I've never bothered buying one myself because I'm not a fan of their bobbin system...so I used to borrow mom's before I bought my own stuff last year).

One more thing: after you have a serger to finish your seams for you....you will never want to go back to the old fashion way of hemming seams...total waste of time.

gendanvs


quality posts: 0 Private Messages gendanvs

Hi guys. Bought a machine (it's my first) and I like it so far. I've basically been playing around with it, haven't been doing anything serious. One thing irks me- when I turn the machine on initially it doesn't go. I press the pedal and it starts sewing but then I can't figure out how to make it stop. Right now I really quickly shut off the machine when I'm done, but this can't be the right way to do things, right?

Anyway, I've heard there might be a problem with the pedal. Is there a way I can get just the pedal exchanged or something?

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 586 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

gendanvs wrote:Hi guys. Bought a machine (it's my first) and I like it so far. I've basically been playing around with it, haven't been doing anything serious. One thing irks me- when I turn the machine on initially it doesn't go. I press the pedal and it starts sewing but then I can't figure out how to make it stop. Right now I really quickly shut off the machine when I'm done, but this can't be the right way to do things, right?

Anyway, I've heard there might be a problem with the pedal. Is there a way I can get just the pedal exchanged or something?



Sounds likes it's worth calling or emailing Singer. They might have a suggestion and they're the ones that can swap out a pedal for you.



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