WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Man oh man, do I want to get some city building on, and I want to get it on, like, NOW. So you can imagine how excited I was to learn about a new iteration of SimCity, the city simulator. It takes all the addictiveness of cocaine but makes it cheaper and arguably less detrimental to a healthy heart. The reviews came out and the game was deemed "GREAT" by excited city-building nerds everywhere.

Kids and adults alike waited for the game to be released so they could join in the fun of building and destroying cities; cities filled with people like you and me. Maybe those people in the game are sitting in their virtual apartments, on their virtual computers, playing a virtual city building simulation. Or maybe WE'RE the SIMULATION! Is your mind blown yet? Good. Because now we have to go into the dimension that exists on the side opposite the screen to your virtual city: reality.

Do you remember that 1990s Winona Rider movie "Reality Bites?" Now it's more than just the name of a coming-of-age movie, it describes the difference between the game at review time and the game when released. In case you haven't heard, SimCity is a super great game that no one was able to play at first. In an effort to curb piracy, to play SimCity you need to be always online. Being always online means there needs to be a warehouse full of servers, chugging along, powered by coal probably, or maybe baby souls. These servers exist to verify that the copy of the game is authentic.

This is going to get a bit wonky, so bear with me. Basically, the technology works like this: When a player switches on their game, it sends a message to one of the server computers. Inside the message is a note that is sealed with wax. The server then inspects the wax seal for authenticity and examines it for signs of tampering. If it is determined that it is both authentic and not tampered with, the server reads the note, which says "I am a real copy." This satisfies the server, which then sends back a message to the client computer that says "You are allowed to play your game now."

OPTIONAL DESCRIPTIVE TITLE FOR IMAGE

The problem was, when everyone turned on their computers to play SimCity, there were too many of these wax sealed messages arriving at the servers, and so the servers demanded better treatment and went on strike. This left players unable to play the game at all. Russ Pitts, Features Editor and Co-Founder of Polygon.com, explained it to me much more eloquently. He made no mention of the wax-stamp authenticating algorithm.

"The server failures (as far as we know now, based on a handful of conversations with the company) have very little to do with DRM tech and very much to do with plain, old, boring server supply and demand." Supply and demand being a metaphorical way to describe wax seals.

Dang, he has a point. Basically the disastrous launch of SimCity and Polygon's now infamous reduction in review score (from a 9.5 pre-launch to a current 4) was caused by a failure to adequately support an always-online system of DRM. But DRM is the worst, right? "The reality is that games companies do not - and cannot - base their business model on expecting that 80% of their product will be consumed but not paid for. Especially in the case of online games that require constant server upkeep and maintenance."

He's right again. I'm starting to think that Russ Pitts is grounded in reality as far as his views on DRM are concerned, especially in pointing out that DRM has become a necessary evil. Arguments based on facts have NO PLACE in gaming discussions. This is Game Fight!

But if the DRM didn't exist, would these server problems even have been an issue? Maxis says it was their idea to implement such a system, so the problem with the servers falls on their heads, not EA. Which is a relief, because it's too easy to hate on EA these days. I imagine there are corporate people wearing suits whose job it is to figure out which path would cause the least amount of unclaimed revenue: launching with DRM and having the servers melt into lava from the stress, or no DRM at all, making paying customers appreciated but also uncommon.

In our conversation, Pitts points out that there are people who will never, ever accept DRM. Ever. And so no matter what happened with this launch, "for the anti-DRM camp, the mere existence of a DRM strategy is abhorrent. They were going to be angry about this issue whether the game functioned properly or not." Pitts posits that had the DRM worked as expected, "the mainstream consumers would probably have never noticed."

As for the game itself, Pitts said "I wish everyone who wanted to could be playing the same game I played for my review, including me. Maxis created a truly amazing experience. It was far better than I expected it to be. The fact that what is available now is not reflective of the experience I had is frustrating, because I'm still convinced there's a 9.5 game in there."

Man, Russ Pitts is good. I'll give him credit. You see, I was hoping I could spin this whole thing into an emotionally driven diatribe against EVERYTHING corporate, punctuating each scathing criticism of EA with with multiple punctuation marks, mostly exclamations and questions. But Pitts talks a lot of sense. Yeah, the DRM sucks forever, but companies lose money on PC games pretty hard because everyone just shares the floppies with their friends. I know there are a million excuses out there from the anti-DRM crowd ("I'll pay when you make a decent product, once decent enough that I'll stop paying nothing for it!"), but DRM is here to stay. Hopefully it will become increasingly less intrusive as time marches on. After the disaster of SimCity, I have a feeling it will. Eventually, we won't even notice DRM at all. The transition from where we are today to a future where we are all owned by multiple corporations who harvest our organs will be so gradual that it will be practically seamless.

I guess the loser of this Game Fight! is... well, me. This piece was supposed to be all salacious rumors and ridiculous hyperbole. Instead it's a look into how wax sealed envelopes help you play games. Point: SimCity.

Don't give up the Game Fight! The fray rages on in the Game Fight! archive.

jabbakus


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jabbakus

Your typical PC gamer (the kind that plays games other that World of Warcraft), is usually looking for exactly this kind of game - a thinking man's game. They are (nowadays) over 20, well educated , with a job and well into their money. The demographics for PC gaming has shifted and the Chumlys at the corporation have not realized it yet - and they keep visualizing their target demographic as adrenaline fueled teens with short attention span , that are into games with over the roof gore and violence and sex, thar lack the money to buy them and thus will happily pirate instead . The opposite is true. PC gamers are older, they like more cerebral games, they have the money to buy them and will not happily go into malware-ridden corners of the internet to download games.


People have been saying for years that PC gaming is dead - gaming companies will not make games for PC because of the high piracy levels. For years, they were proved wrong. But as of late, between sh*t like Steam and sh*t like DRM , the PC gaming industry is doing all it can to commit suicide through sheer stupidity. The big gaming companies thought they will have the last laugh by switching to console-only releases and treating us with sub-par ports - well now both PS3 and XBOX formats are cracked so who's having the last laugh?

Maxis and EA have rightfully earned their place in the hall of shame. Don't buy another game from them and let them burn.

Aldric


quality posts: 2 Private Messages Aldric

The server issues were just the tip of the iceberg sadly. Once you were able to get in, you found the simplest of AI's, fudged numbers, horrible city eating bugs, broken trade, and all around unsatisfactory experince.

It is pretty though...

Eventually there will be a good game under there. Just give them a couple months to get to the eventually and save yourself the heartache of buying it now.

fencerpts


quality posts: 0 Private Messages fencerpts

It might not suck so bad if copyright wasn't so one-sided against the consumer. Doing an end-around on the first-sale convention with "licensing" (although I consider licensing a lifetime rental rather than a purcahse since, according to first-sale, what is bought can be sold...or to put it succintly, I hit "buy," not "license" or "rent"). But suppose this example happens, or I don't have a network connection (I just might want to play SC5 on an airplane), or heaven forbid (because it never happens) that a company stops supporting the servers. Sometimes I whip out the old copy of SC2K...but what will become of SC5 in a decade when I'm feeling nostalgic? I'm not in the "never will accept DRM" camp, but that doesn't mean I'm not in the "DRM treats me like garbage" camp...but I can dream of a day when someone like Russ Pitts might actually address the concers of my camp. In the meantime, I feel like I'm witnessing a rerun of the Southpark episode spoofing the BP oil spill: "we're sorry. We're so sorry. Sorry."

I went with "CitiesXL" for the city simulation experience...and with a lot less DRM-abuse.

madigan82


quality posts: 1 Private Messages madigan82
jabbakus wrote:But as of late, between sh*t like Steam and sh*t like DRM , the PC gaming industry is doing all it can to commit suicide through sheer stupidity.



Steam is the only reason I buy video games anymore. For my PS3 I use Gamefly. But between the ease of using Steam and their near constant sales, I have not played an illegally acquired game in years. Most of the games I buy through Steam now are indie games I would never have heard of or from smaller studios that don't have the money for PR campaigns.

http://steamdb.info/calculator/?player=madigan&currency=us


Kyralessa


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Kyralessa

Now consider this:

Some gamers were unhappy. They bought a digital copy of a game that didn't work. So they asked for their money back.

Now usually you don't get your money back, because it's too easy to make an illegal copy and keep the game even though you got your money back.

Ah, but with the new SimCity you can't do that, because you can't play the game without EA/Maxis approval.

So it should be a simple matter for them to refund your money and bar you from playing the game.

And how does EA respond?

They say you can't have your money back on a game that they are able to prevent you from playing anymore.

Don't preach to us about DRM, buddy. This action, more than any other, tells you what DRM is really about. It's about extracting your money for something that you will never own or have any control over.

The only way to win is not to play.

jabbakus


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jabbakus
madigan82 wrote:Steam is the only reason I buy video games anymore. For my PS3 I use Gamefly. But between the ease of using Steam and their near constant sales, I have not played an illegally acquired game in years. Most of the games I buy through Steam now are indie games I would never have heard of or from smaller studios that don't have the money for PR campaigns.

http://steamdb.info/calculator/?player=madigan&currency=us



All online services die eventually. Fact. Steam's tipping point is easily foreseeable - it's when there are not enough new games released so that they compensate through sales for the infrastructure they will have to maintain to service existing, old content. They will have to shut down. What will you do then? I'll be happily playing my DRM free games, thank you.


ekummel


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ekummel

It is common knowledge that DRM in no way prevents piracy of programs. All it does is prevent the casual user from using the program. The people who pirate the games can do so with no problems at all...
All DRM does is create bad blood between the company and the people they wish to sell their products to!

Xeryon


quality posts: 3 Private Messages Xeryon

I am pretty sure the only titles I've purchased are ones without advanced DRM and the only titles I have pirated were ones with advanced DRM. Mostly because I didn't want to financially contribute to companies that go to such extreme lengths to protect their products that they will infect your computer with non-removable applications and the like.

Some of my favorite titles of all time that I go back to playing again and again are all older than 10 years. In ten years when the DRM servers are all off-line then what? Does anyone honestly believe the developers would release a patch that unlocks the DRM? lol

BatCountry


quality posts: 1 Private Messages BatCountry

Besides the DRM which I can deal with, or the fact I preordered and couldn't play for almost a week, is the fact that the game is still EXTREMELY bugged out. Trading is terrible, emergency response service is terrible (have you seen ambulances or fire trucks wait patiently for you and the 20 people behind you to pass through the intersection before they continue on their hurried, lights flashing, emergency way?), industry supply and demand is screwed, inter-region commerce is a joke, and map size is sad.

The map sizes are supposed to be smaller in part to facilitate inter-city resource sharing, but with the core functionality of this still bugged out, it basically makes the long term success of your city very hard to maintain and achieve.


Its a good game deep inside but it needs a lot of tweaking and patching before it becomes something I will play for hours like I did with prior versions.


And to the guy saying he will play CitiesXL - That game is terrible. Memory leaks will destroy your building experience and the lack of patching and customer support will leave you more dissatisfied than SC5 ever will.

Game on!

0 quality posts and proud of it.

lorddreams469


quality posts: 0 Private Messages lorddreams469

I feel like a got screwed into buying a beta version of SimCity 5 for $60. This game has too many bugs - as previously detailed.

I asked for a refund after almost 3 days of NOT being able to play it, and they they refused. For all intents and purposes this was an unused game!

However, I did feel a lot better after seeding several of Maxis and EA's games for a week. I figure I used my refund money hot someone else get a copy of a game of their choice.

Listen2Reason


quality posts: 4 Private Messages Listen2Reason

"The reality is that games companies do not - and cannot - base their business model on expecting that 80% of their product will be consumed but not paid for."

*cough GoG.com cough*

bmtphoenix


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bmtphoenix

80%, huh? And that's a fact? I'd love to see the source that claims that 80% of people who would buy a DRM infested game won't buy it when it's DRM free, because that's what he's asserting. I can't think of a more asinine statement. How would you even go about proving that obviously BS statistic?

mambojuice


quality posts: 2 Private Messages mambojuice
jabbakus wrote:All online services die eventually. Fact. Steam's tipping point is easily foreseeable - it's when there are not enough new games released so that they compensate through sales for the infrastructure they will have to maintain to service existing, old content. They will have to shut down. What will you do then? I'll be happily playing my DRM free games, thank you.



Hasn't the head honcho at Steam publicly stated that if/when they die they will release a patch that will no longer require any Steam purchases to be launched with Steam?

Pinker


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Pinker
jabbakus wrote:All online services die eventually. Fact. Steam's tipping point is easily foreseeable - it's when there are not enough new games released so that they compensate through sales for the infrastructure they will have to maintain to service existing, old content. They will have to shut down. What will you do then? I'll be happily playing my DRM free games, thank you.



With the push for the Steam box and Gaben hopefully, eventually announcing HL EP3. I don't see them going anywhere anytime soon.

Origin on the other hand, EA just further proves that they still can't manufacture any sort of understanding for their customer base. Steam does as well as it does, because of the sales, because of incorporating new ideas, like the Humble Bundles. Regarding SC5 though, I don't really feel any sympathy for those who bought into the EA hype. It's not like this is the first time we've heard of an EA screw job.

Uriel238


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Uriel238

Oh, Sim City is the gift that keeps on giving.

See first there was the whole server-shortage debacle. Then the refund thing and now it's finally off the ground, right?

Well, in the old days you got to restore when you messed up. Not any more.

And that leads to special levels of griefing. The early one was building a city of all residential which would breed criminals who would then scamper off to your neighboring (other players') cities.

But now you just cut to the chase. It's apparently easy to hack into other cities and summon Gojira.

Good times for the rest of us.

cappo


quality posts: 34 Private Messages cappo
bmtphoenix wrote:80%, huh? And that's a fact? I'd love to see the source that claims that 80% of people who would buy a DRM infested game won't buy it when it's DRM free, because that's what he's asserting. I can't think of a more asinine statement. How would you even go about proving that obviously BS statistic?



The Piracy rate is determined by the company pulling a sales number out of their hind end that they would never ever achieve in their wildest dreams, then subtracting the actual amount of sales they get from that number. The resulting fantasy number they attribute to piracy.

For instance... I programmed a game in QBasic when I was in high school. I will claim my estimates of it's sales would have been 50 million. No one actually bought one. That means 50 million people pirated my game. FACT!

(In reality I doubt anyone I didn't personally gave it to ever actually knew of it's existence, but that's how piracy estimates work.)


Phoulmouth


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Phoulmouth

I see a whole lot of blah blah blah.

Simple fact is that they screwed up their beta testing and massively under estimated their servers. These new "always online" games have been doing that consistently. Look at the D3 release, same thing. And that from a company with a much better track record than EA/Maxis.

The game itself runs great and is truly fun to play. I played it Saturday for a little while, but that little while quickly turned into like 8 hours straight without realizing it. Its a game you can truly get lost in.

Some people are going to run their mouths and hate on it. But w/e, games are evolving and the way this one is set up for region play it really is amazing.

If you haven't bought this game based on reading what the crybabies are whining about all over the web, I suggest you pick it up. It is well worth the price tag.

For anyone who cares, I played all the SimCity games. This one is the best by far.

Phoulmouth


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Phoulmouth
jabbakus wrote:People have been saying for years that PC gaming is dead - gaming companies will not make games for PC because of the high piracy levels. For years, they were proved wrong. But as of late, between sh*t like Steam and sh*t like DRM , the PC gaming industry is doing all it can to commit suicide through sheer stupidity.

Maxis and EA have rightfully earned their place in the hall of shame. Don't buy another game from them and let them burn.



Jaded much? I mean really, I have been reading filth like this all over the place and quite frankly it is tiring and complete bullsh!t.

Steam and DRM killing games? Really? Show me some statistical data that shows me that less people are buying games with these formats than the pirateable games. Oh, you can't can you. Because that data doesn't exist.

Maxis and EA deserve to burn? Are you being serious? You do realize you are having a complete and total spaz fit over a "VIDEO GAME" right? Does that not seem a bit pathetic to you to get so upset that you are saying these people deserve to burn?

Seriously, before posting filth like this why don't you go through and read it first to see just how pathetic and childish you sound. Maybe next time you won't make a complete ass out of yourself.

Phoulmouth


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Phoulmouth
Pinker wrote:Regarding SC5 though, I don't really feel any sympathy for those who bought into the EA hype. It's not like this is the first time we've heard of an EA screw job.



I preordered the game, downloaded it on release without an issue and have had little to no problems playing it since then. There were a few DCs and a few small regional bugs, but nothing that was any different from any release of any online game I have played over the past 10 years.

EVERY SINGLE TIME I have wanted to play the game I have been able to play it. That is definitely the kind of screwjob I like.

Phoulmouth


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Phoulmouth
jabbakus wrote:All online services die eventually. Fact. Steam's tipping point is easily foreseeable - it's when there are not enough new games released so that they compensate through sales for the infrastructure they will have to maintain to service existing, old content. They will have to shut down. What will you do then? I'll be happily playing my DRM free games, thank you.



You people and your conspiracy theories. So funny. Its like you are replying and spouting facts that you have no clue about.

Steam has publicly said that if it came down to them closing their doors and having to shut down they will release a patch that will remove the need for steam servers to play their games. This is fact, its in the steam forums, its on the web, its in blogs.

Oh, and as far as steam going under. You do realize that a lot of the steam multiplayer games play off of steams servers and that the companies that own the games rent the server space right? They don't just sell games. They have a lot more income than you think they do.

Phoulmouth


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Phoulmouth

As to all the DRM haters. You really need to show some maturity and critically think about why DRM is being used.

If you spent millions of dollars making a game fully knowing that it would be pirated by a LARGE portion of your target audience then.... what would you do? Just let these people steal from you? Lose money? Go bankrupt eventually?

I can't possibly think any of you are really that stupid, but based on the replies I see here.... I am not so sure.

But w/e, you should all go to work and forget to punch in and out for a few days. Bust your butts at work for no pay. Because that is exactly what you want these game companies to do. Its like none of you have even the slightest clue how much it actually costs to take a game from concept to finished product.......

xmicahx


quality posts: 0 Private Messages xmicahx

all i have to say is...

anno 2070 is amazing.

cured my city building itch.

Pinker


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Pinker
Phoulmouth wrote:I preordered the game, downloaded it on release without an issue and have had little to no problems playing it since then. There were a few DCs and a few small regional bugs, but nothing that was any different from any release of any online game I have played over the past 10 years.

EVERY SINGLE TIME I have wanted to play the game I have been able to play it. That is definitely the kind of screwjob I like.



Congratulations, you're either; A shill, lying, or at best in the extreme minority judging from the backlash.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/gaming/2013/03/18/simcity-ea-sales/1997051/

1.1 million units for a AAA title is a flop. 15 million hours from those 1.1 million buyers, so a game that's been out for 2 weeks has seen an average play time of 15 hours per player.

But things must be peachy keen since they worked for you, and Riccitiello stepping down must be purely coincidence.

SpicyMike


quality posts: 0 Private Messages SpicyMike

My standard comment has been "F*** Ubisoft" after they went with their always-on DRM with their games. Now it is changed to "F*** Ubisoft & EA".

I despise DRM that takes the stance of "You are a pirate until you prove otherwise", and makes a customer jump through hoops just to play the game they bought. These companies need to re-learn about customer service.

Oh well, at least there are a lot of indie game projects out there that are worth giving money to, instead of these selfish companies!

eethomp


quality posts: 0 Private Messages eethomp
Aldric wrote:The server issues were just the tip of the iceberg sadly. Once you were able to get in, you found the simplest of AI's, fudged numbers, horrible city eating bugs, broken trade, and all around unsatisfactory experince.


QFT. The first SimCity release had a more satisfying city simulation engine than SimCity 5 does. I don't share your optimism because I think the Glassbox simulation is fundamentally flawed. It doesn't track in enough detail and to get it tracking enough detail I have a hunch it's going to get CPU-crippling. EA completely missed the mark as far as what fans do with SimCity, and they didn't have enough of a beta to realize it. How could they release a game where city buses roam in traffic-crippling packs, fires are put out one at a time, city services randomly stop working, and RCI ratios are so broken that there are YouTube videos of players building residential-only cities?

It's a shame because had Maxis simply stuck to the SimCity4 engine and added specializations and global trade they would have had a great, long-lasting game.

jai151


quality posts: 8 Private Messages jai151
Phoulmouth wrote:As to all the DRM haters. You really need to show some maturity and critically think about why DRM is being used.

If you spent millions of dollars making a game fully knowing that it would be pirated by a LARGE portion of your target audience then.... what would you do? Just let these people steal from you? Lose money? Go bankrupt eventually?

I can't possibly think any of you are really that stupid, but based on the replies I see here.... I am not so sure.

But w/e, you should all go to work and forget to punch in and out for a few days. Bust your butts at work for no pay. Because that is exactly what you want these game companies to do. Its like none of you have even the slightest clue how much it actually costs to take a game from concept to finished product.......



The problem is the reality of pirating and the claims of how damaging it is do not even come close to matching.

By and large, people who pirate a game either would never have purchased the game to begin with (therefore not a lost sale) or wind up buying the game eventually (therefore still not a lost sale).

The same can be said for movies, music, and any other media.

Also, clunky DRM garbage is not the way to defeat piracy. EVERY DRM protected bit of software or media HAS BEEN DEFEATED. This is not an arms race any one side will win. The way to win is to change the game.

Change the way content is delivered. Remove the packaging, remove the delivery costs, keep things digital and lower the price accordingly. Companies have made great strides on everything except that last bit, but that's the important one. But it's easier to sue than change the paradigm, and they'd rather waste money on DRM (which, in the end, accomplishes nothing) than actually take a good hard look at their business model.

BatCountry


quality posts: 1 Private Messages BatCountry
Phoulmouth wrote:I preordered the game, downloaded it on release without an issue and have had little to no problems playing it since then. There were a few DCs and a few small regional bugs, but nothing that was any different from any release of any online game I have played over the past 10 years.

EVERY SINGLE TIME I have wanted to play the game I have been able to play it. That is definitely the kind of screwjob I like.



Congratualtions! You are in the extreme minority! I preordered the game and couldn't even get the game to download until Thursday morning. I guess it is all in everyone's head the DISASTER that this game release was and the fact top brass from EA is stepping down two weeks after all this garbage started. Yes, there are some people here who are nerd raging, but you sound like a complete jerk as well.

If everyone's experience was like yours this conversation would not be taking place. I have been a PC gamer for over 20 years and have played pretty much every major title release in that time and can tell you that beyond Diablo 3 I have never experienced such a terrible game release.

0 quality posts and proud of it.

uwradu


quality posts: 0 Private Messages uwradu

DIVX for games, nothing more, nothing less. But unlikes video consumers, gamers apparently have much less self control and ability to deny themselves that which is not good for their pocketbook or sanity, so unlike DIVX this doesn't seem to go away. Well, I'm voting with my pocketbook--the only way I will ever buy SC5 is in five years out of a $5 bargains bin with the DRM stripped. Maybe it will also be less buggy by then. That's how I bought SC2K and I still mightily enjoy that.

jai151


quality posts: 8 Private Messages jai151

Diablo 3's release wasn't really that bad. There was like one day of not being able to log in, a few days of spotty connection issues, then it was over.

From what I can tell with this one (have not picked it up, no plans to), if even half of what I heard is true, it's a debacle far worse than anything Diablo saw.

jabbakus


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jabbakus
mambojuice wrote:Hasn't the head honcho at Steam publicly stated that if/when they die they will release a patch that will no longer require any Steam purchases to be launched with Steam?



In all honesty he did, but the User Agreement says the usual "we are under no obligation of any sort".

jabbakus


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jabbakus
SpicyMike wrote:My standard comment has been "F*** Ubisoft" after they went with their always-on DRM with their games. Now it is changed to "F*** Ubisoft & EA".

I despise DRM that takes the stance of "You are a pirate until you prove otherwise", and makes a customer jump through hoops just to play the game they bought. These companies need to re-learn about customer service.

Oh well, at least there are a lot of indie game projects out there that are worth giving money to, instead of these selfish companies!



Precisely. All the big PC gaming companies are busy shooting themselves in the foot as fast and as many times as they can. The PC gaming it's not dying. It's committing suicide.

jabbakus


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jabbakus
Phoulmouth wrote:You people and your conspiracy theories. So funny. Its like you are replying and spouting facts that you have no clue about.

Steam has publicly said that if it came down to them closing their doors and having to shut down they will release a patch that will remove the need for steam servers to play their games. This is fact, its in the steam forums, its on the web, its in blogs.

Oh, and as far as steam going under. You do realize that a lot of the steam multiplayer games play off of steams servers and that the companies that own the games rent the server space right? They don't just sell games. They have a lot more income than you think they do.



Ahh, you people repeating your internet hear-say are so funny. Read your Steam user agreement and show me the line that says that you will be able to use the games if their service shuts down, because here's the one I have found:


The Software is licensed, not sold. Your license confers no title or ownership in the Software. To make use of the Software, you must have a Steam Account and you may be required to be running the Steam client and maintaining a connection to the Internet.
You understand that for reasons that include, without limitation, system security, stability, and multiplayer interoperability, Steam may need to automatically update, pre-load, create new versions of or otherwise enhance the Software and accordingly, the system requirements to use the Software may change over time. You understand that this Agreement (including applicable Subscription Terms) do not entitle you to future updates, new versions or other enhancements of the Software associated with a particular Subscription, although Valve may choose to provide such updates, etc. in its sole discretion

jai151


quality posts: 8 Private Messages jai151
jabbakus wrote:
To make use of the Software, you must have a Steam Account and you may be required to be running the Steam client and maintaining a connection to the Internet.



You MAY BE required. All terms of service are CYA policies, no more, no less. And yet even in there they state you don't necessarily need the client or connection.

And actually, most games you can play now just fine with steam in offline mode.

ehejl


quality posts: 2 Private Messages ehejl
madigan82 wrote:Steam is the only reason I buy video games anymore.



Seconded. I've got this massive backlog of games waiting to be played that I bought on the super cheap.

cappo


quality posts: 34 Private Messages cappo

Although I find the steam client annoying, the sales and cheap indie games have kept me spending money.

But, as previously stated, you can play a lot of their games in offline mode. Big difference.