morpheus282


quality posts: 6 Private Messages morpheus282
suned wrote:It's pretty darn powerful and I have gone to town on a few dogwoods in my yard with it. It won't run out of gas in the middle of cutting the dogwood either.



No, you just have to make sure the extension cord is long enough!

All the positive reviews of this item have me wondering if I'm a fool for passing it up, but I'm going to have to let it go. For the price I think I'm better off getting the pruner attachment for my Ryobi string trimmer.

nic walker


quality posts: 2 Private Messages nic walker

Need Help before I leap please. I have got a lot of tree brush that needs to be cut up and gone but some of it is over 100 feet away from an electrical outlet/source - will this saw still operate effectively with 100 + a 25 or 50 foot cable please?

Thanks,

Nic

nic walker

bluemaple


quality posts: 77 Private Messages bluemaple
nic walker wrote:Need Help before I leap please. I have got a lot of tree brush that needs to be cut up and gone but some of it is over 100 feet away from an electrical outlet/source - will this saw still operate effectively with 100 + a 25 or 50 foot cable please?

Thanks,

Nic



Can't speak precisely about this tool but I'd be very careful about running *any* electrical motor device on a cord longer than 100 feet - and some devices wouldn't even like that length.

The longer the cord the heavier the gauge you need. That means at *least* 12 gauge for 100 feet or longer.

Long cords cause the voltage to drop which means the motor has to work harder to make the thing work. That means it runs hot and eventually the motor burns out or its lifespan is reduced.

I (sadly) laugh when seeing folks trying to power their refrigerator off their neighbor's generator during a power outage... via multiple cheap extension cords. They should let the food rot.

For outside power tools, buy good, 12 gauge cords, minimum. Your motors will love you.

Edit: For those folks who go blurry eyed when they hear "gauge", a higher number means lighter, smaller gauge. A lower number means heavier, bigger gauge. So a 12 gauge cord is actually heavier (better) and thicker than a 14 gauge cord.

Smart contractors don't mess with anything less than 10 gauge cords when they need distance, but those cords are harder to find. Woot?

ROGETRAY


quality posts: 169 Private Messages ROGETRAY

Staff

nic walker wrote:Need Help before I leap please. I have got a lot of tree brush that needs to be cut up and gone but some of it is over 100 feet away from an electrical outlet/source - will this saw still operate effectively with 100 + a 25 or 50 foot cable please?

Thanks,

Nic



bluemaple gave some excellent advice about cord length.

you can also check the manual/PDF:
https://www.worx.com/Assets/WorxManuals/WG307%20WG308.pdf
The manual details the maximum cord length and further details/instructions

According to Home Depot, the product's cord length is 2' ft :
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Worx-4-in-Electric-Corded-JawSaw-Chainsaw-WG307/203177778#.UXXww3fm-So

If you buy the extension version, you'll gain an extra 5 ft as well.

Hope all this information was helpful

nic walker


quality posts: 2 Private Messages nic walker

Thanks for the reply folks - greatly appreciated. I clicked on the Home Depot link provided (thanks again ) and the cord lenght is 100 feet using a 12 gauge which I can comply with....I am going to buy - thanks again....

Nic

nic walker

dviglino


quality posts: 10 Private Messages dviglino

Looks like a neat, safer way to cut the limbs off a fallen tree. Still can't really rationalize it since I have a good proper Stihl gas powered saw. But if I didn't need to take trunks I'd probably get one...