WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Leupold Ventana Angled Spotting Scope

Speed to First Woot:
6m 37.441s
First Sucker:
reikster
Last Wooter to Woot:
SeagalCQ
Last Purchase:
a year ago
Order Pace (rank):
Bottom 38% of Woot.com Woots
Top 37% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Top 18% of Woot.com Woots
Top 13% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

  • 15% first woot
  • 7% second woot
  • 30% < 10 woots
  • 22% < 25 woots
  • 25% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 13% joined today
  • 0% one week old
  • 1% one month old
  • 9% one year old
  • 76% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 94% bought 1
  • 3% bought 2
  • 3% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

3%
3%
2%
1%
2%
1%
7%
7%
8%
11%
10%
7%
7%
4%
4%
5%
4%
3%
2%
2%
2%
1%
3%
3%
12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Woots by State

zero wooters wootinglots of wooters wooting



Quality Posts


lichme


quality posts: 2870 Private Messages lichme

baybei


quality posts: 49 Private Messages baybei

I spy with my little Leupold Ventana SX-1 15-45x60mm Angled Spotting Scope an undiscovered species of brilliant red bird.

Oh, wait, never mind, apparently that's a red angry birds plush perched in my neighbors window...oops!

conanthelibrarian


quality posts: 3495 Private Messages conanthelibrarian

Quite a few comments from when this was offered in March

conanthelibrarian


quality posts: 3495 Private Messages conanthelibrarian

Very good reviews (4.8 out of 5.0) over at opticsplanet.com

rbarger


quality posts: 3 Private Messages rbarger

About $45 less than anywhere I could find it doing a quick Google Shopping search and $69 cheaper here than a store I've purchased from and recognize from the list. I think I am going to be in for one.

cmeej


quality posts: 2 Private Messages cmeej

mevande


quality posts: 6 Private Messages mevande

So basically there are quite a few bird brains that would purchase this. At first glance, I thought it was a high tech scope you could mount on a gun for bird shooting (could make a Turkey an easy shot), but nooo, it for watching birds? :P

SkekTek


quality posts: 17 Private Messages SkekTek

LEUPOLD!



I will say, as a bird biologist, that an angled spotting scope is great, much better than straight, and a lot more comfortable to use if you have a tripod. Also, one of these with a cheap digital camera and camera mount that goes on the eyepiece makes a great telephoto camera for a fraction of the cost of an SLR lens.

mbanerje


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mbanerje

I am trying to understand this line in the description section -- "By definition, Synergy Built optics are greater than their individual parts."

cole103


quality posts: 9 Private Messages cole103
mevande wrote:So basically there are quite a few bird brains that would purchase this. At first glance, I thought it was a high tech scope you could mount on a gun for bird shooting (could make a Turkey an easy shot), but nooo, it for watching birds? :P


So you shoot turkeys with a sniper rifle???

darkinc


quality posts: 31 Private Messages darkinc
cole103 wrote:So you shoot turkeys with a sniper rifle???



Is there any other way?!

steve626


quality posts: 0 Private Messages steve626

From what I've heard, if the name is Leupold, then it's made in the USA.

erict


quality posts: 0 Private Messages erict

I bought the Redfield deal: http://sport.woot.com/offers/redfield-20-60x80mm-spotting-scope-1

a few weeks ago at this same price. Redfield is now made by Leupold and also carries a lifetime warranty. The Redfield came with compact tripod and 2 cases. It also is a max of 60X and has a larger field of view 80mm. If Woot is true to form they will have the Redfield again someday before too long, but this Leupold is also a very good deal.

gemsot


quality posts: 0 Private Messages gemsot

Great Woot, in for 2!

trshaw


quality posts: 1 Private Messages trshaw
mbanerje wrote:I am trying to understand this line in the description section -- "By definition, Synergy Built optics are greater than their individual parts."



management/marketing gobidly gook. "we put our engineers in the same building so they talk to each other" rather than just tossing things over the wall and hope specs/requirements are sufficient to make it work.

misubo


quality posts: 0 Private Messages misubo
mbanerje wrote:I am trying to understand this line in the description section -- "By definition, Synergy Built optics are greater than their individual parts."



It's a pun. Synergy is defined as "The interaction or cooperation of two or more organizations, substances, or other agents to produce a combined effect greater than the sum of their separate effects."

joeman1890


quality posts: 1 Private Messages joeman1890

If you're shopping on a budget, pay for quality glass before magnification. It's better to have a crisp, clear image at 45x than it is to have a dark, mushy image and 60x magnification.

It's a bit of shame to be buying a Leupold (Loo-Pold, if you didn't know already) product made in China but that's the current state of things. I'm in for one because it's too good a deal to pass up.

arpruss


quality posts: 3 Private Messages arpruss

A 2.3 degree real field of view at 15X magnification is unimpressive.

This gives an apparent field of view of 34.5 degrees -- i.e., there is a relatively narrow viewing circle (standard binocular eyepieces give 45 degrees or more).

At 45X magnification, the apparent field of view is a more respectable 54 degrees, but if you're using it hand-held, you won't be able to get more than 15X before the shaking kills the view.

willowtree1061


quality posts: 0 Private Messages willowtree1061

"Tripod and Digital Camera Compatible"

How do I attach the camera?

phishneslo


quality posts: 5 Private Messages phishneslo
arpruss wrote:A 2.3 degree real field of view at 15X magnification is unimpressive.

This gives an apparent field of view of 34.5 degrees -- i.e., there is a relatively narrow viewing circle (standard binocular eyepieces give 45 degrees or more).

At 45X magnification, the apparent field of view is a more respectable 54 degrees, but if you're using it hand-held, you won't be able to get more than 15X before the shaking kills the view.



that is not how you calculate apparent field of view.

based on the ISO 14132-1:2002 standard
tan ω' = Γ x tan ω
Apparent field of view:2ω'
Real field of view:2ω
Magnification:Γ

which makes it a little less than 34.5, i think.

is this out of the normal range of 15x zoom opticals? I don't know. i only use fixed...


khearn


quality posts: 2 Private Messages khearn

I've got two spotting scopes, one with an angled eyepiece, and one that is straight. If you're looking at something that is stationary, like a bird nest or a shooting target on a range, the angled eyepiece can make it easier to set it up for a comfortable position. But for cases where you will be spending much time trying to find your target, the straight eyepiece makes it much easier. Trying to find a comet, for example, where it is a slightly lighter spot against the sky, it's nice to be able to look directly at it, then line up the scope, rather than looking down into the scope and trying to figure out where it's actually pointing.

jmbunkin


quality posts: 28 Private Messages jmbunkin

Seems like comments were deleted,wonder why?

arpruss


quality posts: 3 Private Messages arpruss
phishneslo wrote:that is not how you calculate apparent field of view.

based on the ISO 14132-1:2002 standard
tan ω' = Γ x tan ω
Apparent field of view:2ω'
Real field of view:2ω
Magnification:Γ

which makes it a little less than 34.5, i think.



Slightly. I used the quick formula that amateur astronomers tend to use: AFOV = magnification x TFOV. The more exact formula yields 33.5 degrees.

is this out of the normal range of 15x zoom opticals? I don't know. i only use fixed...



Zoom opticals do tend to have rather narrower apparent field of view, and I expect generally at the low-magnification end.

But I do think 34 degrees is still pretty low. The narrower the field of view, the more panning as the object moves and the more difficult to find the object.

Compare the low-end Celestron 8-24mm zoom (the same 3X zoom range as this scope) astronomy eyepiece ($75) where the apparent field of view ranges from 40 to 60 degrees (presumably 40 being at the low-magnification 24mm end). I've considered buying an eyepiece of that sort, but 40 degrees is just too narrow for me, at least for astronomy.

I don't know why on such an expensive spotting scope they couldn't pop in a wider eyepiece, but then I've never used a spotting scope.

The much cheaper fixed-magnification Celestron 15x70 binoculars ($60 on Amazon) are advertised as having a 4.4 degree true field of view at the same magnification, which should make for almost twice as big an apparent field of view. (Great binoculars, by the way, except for some alignment issues--I had to exchange the initial pair.)

iwantamonkey


quality posts: 5 Private Messages iwantamonkey

This isn't a telescope. Nor is it a pair of binoculars. As mentioned in its title: it is a spotting scope.

It's supposed to have a narrow field of view.

You set it down next to you on a tripod. You sight it in on a target 500 yards away. Before you shoot (open sights, none of that scope stuff) you look in it to read the wind and mirage down at the target. Then, after you take your shot, you look in it to see where you hit.

roadhunter


quality posts: 14 Private Messages roadhunter
arpruss wrote:

Compare the low-end Celestron 8-24mm zoom (the same 3X zoom range as this scope) astronomy eyepiece ($75) where the apparent field of view ranges from 40 to 60 degrees (presumably 40 being at the low-magnification 24mm end). I've considered buying an eyepiece of that sort, but 40 degrees is just too narrow for me, at least for astronomy.

I don't know why on such an expensive spotting scope they couldn't pop in a wider eyepiece, but then I've never used a spotting scope.

The much cheaper fixed-magnification Celestron 15x70 binoculars ($60 on Amazon) are advertised as having a 4.4 degree true field of view at the same magnification, which should make for almost twice as big an apparent field of view.



Binoculars tend to have twice as big a field of view...what with having TWO optical tubes and all ; -)

Seriously, though, I have bought several pairs of the same Celestron binoculars over the years, and they are far superior to something like this for astronomy.

roadhunter


quality posts: 14 Private Messages roadhunter
iwantamonkey wrote:This isn't a telescope. Nor is it a pair of binoculars. As mentioned in its title: it is a spotting scope.

It's supposed to have a narrow field of view.

You set it down next to you on a tripod. You sight it in on a target 500 yards away. Before you shoot (open sights, none of that scope stuff) you look in it to read the wind and mirage down at the target. Then, after you take your shot, you look in it to see where you hit.



You copied this from the "Spotting Scope Rulebook", right? You won't rat on me if I point mine at the sky, will you?

disturbed0ne


quality posts: 9 Private Messages disturbed0ne
mevande wrote:So basically there are quite a few bird brains that would purchase this. At first glance, I thought it was a high tech scope you could mount on a gun for bird shooting (could make a Turkey an easy shot), but nooo, it for watching birds? :P



Even the firearms enthusiast buying this isn't mounting it on a gun. It sits on the bench next to you at the range and you use it to determine hits/misses at the target that's too far to see hits/misses on with the naked eye.

Strick28


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Strick28


Yeah they were. Pretty interesting to say the least.

jmbunkin wrote:Seems like comments were deleted,wonder why?



iwantamonkey


quality posts: 5 Private Messages iwantamonkey
roadhunter wrote:You copied this from the "Spotting Scope Rulebook", right? You won't rat on me if I point mine at the sky, will you?



Hmmm, which response should I use?:

Mild teasing: It depends on what you're shooting at the sky. DHS says if I see something I should say something.

Ominous: If you're within 800 yards, I won't need to rat on you. (Just don't move quickly, it has a narrow field of view.)

Jerky McJerkface: Yeah! I will! I didn't just copy the Spotting Scope Rulebook, I wrote it! I'm telling on you! MOM!!!!

Laissez-faire libertarian: Once you buy it, you can point it at anything you want.

I'll go with the last one, and I'll leave my bathroom curtains open.

jmbunkin


quality posts: 28 Private Messages jmbunkin
Strick28 wrote:Yeah they were. Pretty interesting to say the least.



I thought so as well,next time we have to be less interesting I guess.

darkinc


quality posts: 31 Private Messages darkinc
jmbunkin wrote:I thought so as well,next time we have to be less interesting I guess.



haha I spent a whole 3 minutes searching for that info and it was just carelessly tossed out the window!

houndawg


quality posts: 3 Private Messages houndawg
cole103 wrote:So you shoot turkeys with a sniper rifle???



A rifle with a scope isn't a sniper rifle. It is a rifle with a scope. A rifle in the hands of a sniper is a sniper rifle, though there really is no such thing as a sniper rifle.

wootdougwoot


quality posts: 12 Private Messages wootdougwoot

Hey, either I missed it or it hasn't been mentioned.

What's the max range for these as far as seeing a bullet hole in a target?

300?400??500??? meters maybe?

Anyone know?

Duhg

Has anyone seen my velociraptor?

djohnk


quality posts: 0 Private Messages djohnk

richardman


quality posts: 0 Private Messages richardman

China?
This scope is made in China?
Already bought it, so it's too late, but how did you determine that?
Boy, am I bummed....

joeman1890


quality posts: 1 Private Messages joeman1890
richardman wrote:China?
This scope is made in China?
Already bought it, so it's too late, but how did you determine that?
Boy, am I bummed....



Leupold website. Considering what it costs to buy an American made Leupold Spotter there's really no way it could be made here. I assume the glass is made in Japan, however. Which is fine as Leupold buys most of its glass from Japan.

joeman1890


quality posts: 1 Private Messages joeman1890

My friendly Postal Service employee dropped mine off minutes ago. I'm still technically "at work" so I can't give it a good test but so far I'm very happy. The scope has a bit of weight to it but it's not a lead weight. It's average size for a scope in this class. Looking out through a screened window at a tree about 100 yards off I can see the edge contour on the leave, the leave stems and the wire that makes up the screen (which is hurting the overall clarity). Not a fair test.

The case is quite nice for trekking a bit but the shoulder strap length is far too short for a tall guy like myself to put over an opposite shoulder (eg. over left shoulder with right arm through the strap) for security. The shoulder pad is neoprene and quite nicely cushioned so I will try to lengthen the strap with some additional webbing. It could have used an accessory pocket or two but maybe I can sew those on as well.

I'll try to take it to the lakefront (Milwaukee) this evening and give it a proper eye test.

bugtussle


quality posts: 1 Private Messages bugtussle

The scope I received was defective out of the box. It would not focus on objects at the outer part of its range. I called their tech support and they said to send it in. It cost me $10 shipping to send it in to Leupold for repair. It took one week to get a bran new one sent back. Great scope and excellent customer service!

PemberDucky


quality posts: 41 Private Messages PemberDucky

Staff

bugtussle wrote:The scope I received was defective out of the box. It would not focus on objects at the outer part of its range. I called their tech support and they said to send it in. It cost me $10 shipping to send it in to Leupold for repair. It took one week to get a bran new one sent back. Great scope and excellent customer service!



glad it all got resolved!


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