WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Glass Partyware

Hey, glad you could make it. CRRRRRRASSSSSH. Oh, don't worry about that -- SHHHHHHHHHHINK  -- everything at this party is made out of glass, so -- KERPLINKKKKKKLE -- things are getting a little crazy. Step right in, but would you mind taking off your shoes? Thanks! 

cvkovacs


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cvkovacs

We got two of the Takeya pitchers last time around, and we loved them - EXCEPT they are SUPER breakable. One arrived cracked and the other one broke within a couple times of using it. They may be able to stand up to boiling liquids but the normal bumps and wear of a kitchen? Apparently not. We were really disappointed since we have been looking for a good pitcher for tea for a while.

dymekd


quality posts: 1 Private Messages dymekd

The beer glasses look nice, but I was able to pick up a set of 6 different shapes, for $20. Hopefully these are way nicer to justify their higher price.

Sample:
http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/1/1/13812-craft-brew-beer-tasting-glasses-set-of-6.html

Zalfrin


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Zalfrin

Someone needs to learn how to pour a glass of beer! *points to multiple inch thick foam from pictures*

whoneeds8


quality posts: 0 Private Messages whoneeds8
Zalfrin wrote:Someone needs to learn how to pour a glass of beer! *points to multiple inch thick foam from pictures*



Someone needs to learn about beer. Those are the proper pours and proper head of REAL Beer.

Bud, Coors, Miller, and the like "light" beers don't have a head because of the inferior ingredients.

During the height of American Strength and Power, the our beer industry became inferior.

w3kn


quality posts: 8 Private Messages w3kn

The beer glasses seem really expensive. I bought 24 Libbey glasses back in December and paid less than $60.

79 woots and counting!

ikickedagirl


quality posts: 2 Private Messages ikickedagirl
w3kn wrote:The beer glasses seem really expensive. I bought 24 Libbey glasses back in December and paid less than $60.



You're telling me! You can go to Ross or TJ Maxx and get a set of 4 pilsner glasses for a fraction of these prices! And glass is glass.

roussie


quality posts: 2 Private Messages roussie

Proper glassware is very important based on the beer style. Here, the variety is a little lacking. The tulip glass should be good for most beers though. The taller glasses would be best for a Heffeweisen (sp?) or maybe a lager. This selection is really missing a snifter or wide bowl tulip for an imperial stout or barley wine kind of thing.

As for the proper pour: these pictures are obviously faked. A beer that light isn't going to have that kind of retention. Maybe if it was a Belgian but then they poured it into improper glassware. You usually want no more than a couple centimeters of bubbles: enough to bring out the aromatics but not so much that the pour disturbs the lees on the bottom of the bottle.

......don't judge me.

Ventrue


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Ventrue

I was excited to see this deal come up, but then when I saw the prices, my dreams were shattered. No pun intended.

r66rus


quality posts: 0 Private Messages r66rus

You know the prices too high... I can go to a bar and get a beer and "borrow" any glass I want...

boomn4x4


quality posts: 13 Private Messages boomn4x4
roussie wrote:Proper glassware is very important based on the beer style.



Its all hype.... the only thing you need for a good pour is a glass that is clean and has a wide enough mouth that your nose can easily get into the glass as you drink it.

Head retention comes from the cleanliness of the glass, not the shape. You are going to get the same head on a clean pint glass as you would get on a clean flute. Tall slender glasses are typically used on light colored beers simply because they allow more light to penetrate. This creates a "brighter" appearing beer and showcases its color. It has nothing to do with flavor.

I am a home brewer and brew about 200 gallons of various beers a year. I do have various glasses that I use for the various types, but only when I have friends over to give them that sense of being a "beer taster".

Personally, when I'm on the couch after putting the kids to bed and relaxing after a day in the office, I almost always drink my beers out of a double walled stemless wine glass. The larger bowl of the glass allows me to get my nose in deep and pull in a larger volume or aromatic air as I drink it. The double walled glass prevents your hand from warming the beer as you hold it.

When what to my wondering eyes should appear, but a bucket of wings and a six pack of beer!

spmcgivern


quality posts: 0 Private Messages spmcgivern
boomn4x4 wrote:Its all hype.... the only thing you need for a good pour is a glass that is clean and has a wide enough mouth that your nose can easily get into the glass as you drink it.

Head retention comes from the cleanliness of the glass, not the shape. You are going to get the same head on a clean pint glass as you would get on a clean flute. Tall slender glasses are typically used on light colored beers simply because they allow more light to penetrate. This creates a "brighter" appearing beer and showcases its color. It has nothing to do with flavor.

I am a home brewer and brew about 200 gallons of various beers a year. I do have various glasses that I use for the various types, but only when I have friends over to give them that sense of being a "beer taster".

Personally, when I'm on the couch after putting the kids to bed and relaxing after a day in the office, I almost always drink my beers out of a double walled stemless wine glass. The larger bowl of the glass allows me to get my nose in deep and pull in a larger volume or aromatic air as I drink it. The double walled glass prevents your hand from warming the beer as you hold it.



As a fellow homebrewer, I agree with your comments. I do use the Spiegelau stemmed Pilsner glasses as my daily glass and it is great. Great for IPAs, DIPAs, and barleywines.

That said, I feel beer drinkers should use a glass they enjoy using irregardless of the type as long as you realize the pros and cons. Thinner glasses retain temperature better than thick. The stemmed Pilsners do a great job of focusing the aromas of the beer, though how much more than a typical bar pint class is debatable. Thicker glasses are more durable (and usually cheaper).

But as long as you are enjoying the beer you drink, you can't be wrong.

cole103


quality posts: 9 Private Messages cole103

Also a homebrewer--of 35 years now. I recently had the opportunity of attending the Spiegelau Beer Tasting Class with a couple of friends and was amazed at the difference a glass can make in the taste of a beer. We used regular bar-type pint glasses as a control and tasted a pilsner, a wheat, an IPA and a doppelbock all out of their respective glasses and all three of us were stunned at the difference. The beers barely resembled each other from the pint to the specialized glass, even though we poured them out of the same bottle. The difference is not only the smell, but the width of the glass opening determines what part of the tongue that the beer lands on, affecting the bitterness profile and malt flavor. To my mind, these glasses make a bigger difference in the taste and complexity of a beer than Reidel wine glasses do for wine!
That being said, one caveat---these are fragile--take extreme care and handwash these gently.

spmcgivern


quality posts: 0 Private Messages spmcgivern
cole103 wrote:Also a homebrewer--of 35 years now. I recently had the opportunity of attending the Spiegelau Beer Tasting Class with a couple of friends and was amazed at the difference a glass can make in the taste of a beer. We used regular bar-type pint glasses as a control and tasted a pilsner, a wheat, an IPA and a doppelbock all out of their respective glasses and all three of us were stunned at the difference. The beers barely resembled each other from the pint to the specialized glass, even though we poured them out of the same bottle. The difference is not only the smell, but the width of the glass opening determines what part of the tongue that the beer lands on, affecting the bitterness profile and malt flavor. To my mind, these glasses make a bigger difference in the taste and complexity of a beer than Reidel wine glasses do for wine!
That being said, one caveat---these are fragile--take extreme care and handwash these gently.



I guess side-by-side glass testing is in order then. I love my Spiegelau stemmed pilsner. And yes, fragile is putting it mildly.

nicesocks


quality posts: 2 Private Messages nicesocks

Are the Amici logos on the side of the bowls and such part of the design or are they part of the packaging that you left on for the photo (that is to say a sticker which will easily come off)?

I ask because they kinda ruin the bowls for me, especially because they appear to don't appear to be uniformly placed on the bowls(which gave me the idea they might be stickers)

However they are featured prominently in the product photos.

chocolatesushi


quality posts: 0 Private Messages chocolatesushi
nicesocks wrote:Are the Amici logos on the side of the bowls and such part of the design or are they part of the packaging that you left on for the photo (that is to say a sticker which will easily come off)?

I ask because they kinda ruin the bowls for me, especially because they appear to don't appear to be uniformly placed on the bowls(which gave me the idea they might be stickers)

However they are featured prominently in the product photos.


Looking at the picture closely I believe they are stickers. You can see the clear plastic ring indicating that it could be a sticker on the back left bowl and front right bow. Although, it could be stamped I highly doubt it. Just my 2 cents.

CowboyDann


quality posts: 716 Private Messages CowboyDann
About Glass
Whether it's Philip Glass or Ira Glass, you know you're in for a CRAZY time with glass.]



Whoever wrote this is a pretty cool person

first2summit


quality posts: 6 Private Messages first2summit
whoneeds8 wrote:Someone needs to learn about beer. Those are the proper pours and proper head of REAL Beer.

Bud, Coors, Miller, and the like "light" beers don't have a head because of the inferior ingredients.

During the height of American Strength and Power, the our beer industry became inferior.



There's a couple reasons why you want the head. First is that it releases the aroma and a large part (majority in fact) of your taste comes from your sense of smell. The other reason is more bar related - it releases the gases into the air and not in your stomach so you're not as bloated and will drink more.

first2summit


quality posts: 6 Private Messages first2summit
cvkovacs wrote:We got two of the Takeya pitchers last time around, and we loved them - EXCEPT they are SUPER breakable.



Disappointing. I thought they were more durable. Thanks for saving me a few bucks.

hrosborn


quality posts: 0 Private Messages hrosborn

Will the Amici Z7MCR521RS/4 Rainbow Margarita Glasses - Set of 4 be for sale again soon?