WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

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Lifeline Emergency Preparedness

Emergencies are those things that happen without advance warning. If you get ready now, you won't have to try and log onto Woot while everyone else is evacuating. Though we would appreciate that level of loyalty.

mav73


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mav73

I would seriously review everything included in these kits before buying -- I'm not saying the quality is good or bad on that the last thing you want in an emergency/survival situation is for your equipment to fail. Also, review the equipment and make sure you know how to use it. I would recommend building your own kit from scratch so you are familiar with the contents.

mnuahs


quality posts: 13 Private Messages mnuahs

Does anybody know how well these kits do in cold weather? I'd imagine the water packets and items like the shampoo/conditioner would freeze solid and burst their containers.

bacalum


quality posts: 4 Private Messages bacalum

I looked at all three bags offered, but wasn't impressed enough to buy. Better to make my own, based on the situations I'm likely to encounter. (Mav73 is right!)

HUGE POINT #1: You will need different items based on your climate and time of year.

Rotating food and water stock every six months is one way to be sure the items are fresh when you need them (I've had C-rations that were years old - some items were okay, some were inedible). Rotating every six months will also remind you to prepare your kit for winter or summer weather.

HUGE POINT #2: 800 calories (2400 total, to last three days) is not much for a large adult. In summer, it's not too bad, but in winter, I hope you can do a fair imitation of Bear Grylls and forage for food. Otherwise, it might be "hello, hypothermia!"

HUGE POINT #3: Now that you've eaten, you need to take care of the other end. Oops! No TP in the kits, and the 1.5 oz hand sanitizer won't last long. You could use the facial tissues or sanitary napkins in a pinch, but what if you need them for their intended use?

Also, it's nice to have a shovel, but what if you're injured, obese, or otherwise unable to squat to defecate? Some rope or bungee cords would be nice, along with some basic lashing & latrine instructions if you don't know how to make & use one.

When rich or powerful people propose a change, it is designed to make them richer or more powerful.

wdsims63


quality posts: 0 Private Messages wdsims63
bacalum wrote:I looked at all three bags offered, but wasn't impressed enough to buy. Better to make my own, based on the situations I'm likely to encounter. (Mav73 is right!)

HUGE POINT #1: You will need different items based on your climate and time of year.

Rotating food and water stock every six months is one way to be sure the items are fresh when you need them (I've had C-rations that were years old - some items were okay, some were inedible). Rotating every six months will also remind you to prepare your kit for winter or summer weather.

HUGE POINT #2: 800 calories (2400 total, to last three days) is not much for a large adult. In summer, it's not too bad, but in winter, I hope you can do a fair imitation of Bear Grylls and forage for food. Otherwise, it might be "hello, hypothermia!"

HUGE POINT #3: Now that you've eaten, you need to take care of the other end. Oops! No TP in the kits, and the 1.5 oz hand sanitizer won't last long. You could use the facial tissues or sanitary napkins in a pinch, but what if you need them for their intended use?

Also, it's nice to have a shovel, but what if you're injured, obese, or otherwise unable to squat to defecate? Some rope or bungee cords would be nice, along with some basic lashing & latrine instructions if you don't know how to make & use one.



Counter Point #1:
Okay, this one is good. I agree.

Counter Point #2:
It is actually designed to last you 2 days, not 3. So, you're looking at 1200 calories a day. Not so bad. Besides, most people (and probably every American) has enough fat to live for at least a week without any food.

Counter Point #3:
Facial tissues? In a survival kit? What are they going to include next, shampoo and conditioner...er...Never mind. Yeah, TP is definitely supposed to in there. Ditch the soap (all of it, you can survive for 2 days a little dirty) and add some TP in there. Flatten the roll (or 2 half rolls) and put them in a zip lock. Soggy TP is useless.

Counter Point #3a:
If you can't squat to defecate, you should be working on that right now, not waiting until you are in a survival situation. Believe me, you will find a way to relieve yourself when the time comes. So, you better be prepared for it when it does happen.
I agree though, there should definitely be some rope in there. Seriously, they put shampoo and conditioner in there, but no rope? What is this survive at the hotel for 2 days?
"Oh My God! There's no shampoo in the bathroom! Thank God we packed the survival kit..."

Myself248


quality posts: 3 Private Messages Myself248
mav73 wrote:I would recommend building your own kit from scratch so you are familiar with the contents.



This, a hundred times this. But anyone who's likely to do that has probably already done so, and this is for everyone else. It's better than nothing.

And maybe, just maybe, someone will buy one of these and beef it up a little. Maybe they'll say "oh this bag has lots of extra space in it, I can add more good stuff without making it too heavy", and it'll kickstart some of what you recommend.

One piece of advice I'll offer: Don't be afraid to have redundant copies of some items. If your car emergency kit has some small pliers in it, and you think your bug-out bag should too, then put 'em in both. If it's a good thing to have, it's okay to have extras.

Another thing: Antibiotic ointment is a super good idea, and these kits never include enough of it. Head over to Minimus.biz and get a hundred of the little packets. Give the extras to your friends as a reminder for them to refresh their own first-aid kits.

xninjagrrl


quality posts: 7 Private Messages xninjagrrl

Yeah these are probably better than nothing but my bug out bag puts these to shame 1000 times over. You really need to plan at least 3 days worth of food/water per person.

Pros: The pills were there.
Cons: So was the tank.

gr8ful79


quality posts: 1 Private Messages gr8ful79

That AAA blanket would be great for taking babies to the park, or just your back yard. Not as girly looking as similar blankets that are marketed to parents.