WootBot


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A decade before his own show revolutionized the sitcom, Jerry Seinfeld had a recurring role on a very un-revolutionary one, Benson. His character "Freddie" was a delivery boy who specialized in very bad jokes and very tight pants. A few seconds of this and even the Seinfeld finale starts to look pretty good.
 


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nathanrudy


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I think Jason Toon may be a young man and not realize how revolutionary it was to have a black man in the 70s as the lead in a sitcom otherwise populated by white people. That Benson was the smartest one in the room all the time, that he was promoted to be the state Treasurer (or whatever that job was) and advised the Governor to the point of being a Svengali was even more amazing.

Was it revolutionary in it's comedy? Not really, though it's progenitor Soap was. But it was still revolutionary in its casting.

Jason Toon


quality posts: 19 Private Messages Jason Toon
nathanrudy wrote:I think Jason Toon may be a young man and not realize how revolutionary it was to have a black man in the 70s as the lead in a sitcom otherwise populated by white people. That Benson was the smartest one in the room all the time, that he was promoted to be the state Treasurer (or whatever that job was) and advised the Governor to the point of being a Svengali was even more amazing.

Was it revolutionary in it's comedy? Not really, though it's progenitor Soap was. But it was still revolutionary in its casting.



Point well taken. As you inferred, I was thinking more of the form and style of its comedy than the social implications. Respect to Benson for that.

As for being young, well, not as young as I would like. Let's just say I was alive and conscious when this episode aired and leave it at that.