WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Poll: Is it OK to end a sentence with a preposition?
  • 38% - Yes, it's time that old-fashioned rule was disposed of! 660
  • 33.3% - No, the old ways are best. 578
  • 28.6% - Don't know. Don't care. 497
1735 votes

Well, how do you fare compared to the Zeitgeist? Chat up your fellow wooters and let us know how lame this poll was or what obvious choices we missed. For example: Was this poll a) STUPID, b) DUMB, c) POINTLESS or d) ALL OF THE ABOVE?

conanthelibrarian


quality posts: 3488 Private Messages conanthelibrarian

Ending a sentence with a preposition is behavior I will not put up with.


SayLaV


quality posts: 0 Private Messages SayLaV
conanthelibrarian wrote:Ending a sentence with a preposition is behavior I will not put up with.



I'll put up with it but it isn't "old" versus "new" it's correct or incorrect. Saying "Where are you?" instead of "Where are you at?" even takes less words and time and is not redundant.

ManiacDan


quality posts: 4 Private Messages ManiacDan

Where's the option for "it was never a rule in the first place, it's an urban legend"?

SayLaV wrote:I'll put up with it but it isn't "old" versus "new" it's correct or incorrect. Saying "Where are you?" instead of "Where are you at?" even takes less words and time and is not redundant.



That's not what people usually mean. Adding random "at" to a sentence is simply incorrect no matter how you slice it. It's not the difference between "where are you" and "where you at" that's being discussed, it's the difference between "where did you come from" and "from where did you come". The former is common (standard) American English, the latter is common (standard) British (Queen's) English.

maxikyd


quality posts: 6 Private Messages maxikyd

As an English teacher, I know that most of the sillier rules of English were, in fact, based on the rules of Latin, not on English. The structure of the Latin language is significantly different than that of the English language. For example, the Latin word structure prevents a split infinitive because their infinitives are single words, so splits are impossible--thus the rule "no split infinitives"; in English, we have "to" as part of our infinitive. Star Trek's "to boldly go where no man has gone before" would not sound as cool as "to go boldly where no man has gone before"; the rhythm isn't the same.
English language scholars are slowly approving changes and, since English is still a living language (I cite "funner" as my favorite, most hated example), the changes will slowly continue to be made. It is my fond wish to see the preposition rule removed. What else is the to live for?

lotsofgoats


quality posts: 3 Private Messages lotsofgoats

That rule isn't even a rule. It was just the preference of one dude. It's not terribly functional.

Anybody claiming otherwise simply doesn't know what he's talking about.

MISRy


quality posts: 0 Private Messages MISRy

It's not something I would plan for.

xtobiasx


quality posts: 1 Private Messages xtobiasx
lotsofgoats wrote:That rule isn't even a rule. It was just the preference of one dude. It's not terribly functional.

Anybody claiming otherwise simply doesn't know what he's talking about.



Who is this "one dude"? He must have been pretty important to make a grammar rule that has affected English speaking people for centuries.

my01lightning


quality posts: 0 Private Messages my01lightning

I am just trying to think of some prepositions to end my sentences with. Has anyone else had this problem before? I wish I had someone to talk to. Now that I think about it, what exactly am I asking you people for? I can't wait until the next poll comes around. I feel better now that I've put my 2 cents in.

caroro93morgan


quality posts: 0 Private Messages caroro93morgan

That reminds me of a good joke... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5gicGY7hzU

HomerTime


quality posts: 1 Private Messages HomerTime

Sometimes when people end a sentence with a preposition it does come out sounding pretty dumb:

"Where are you at?" makes the speaker sound like an imbecile. "Where are you?" sounds better and is fewer words. There is no reason not to use the correct version.

However, sometimes, the converse is true:

"These are not the droids you are looking for" is bother fewer words and sounds less goofy then "These are not the droids for which you are looking"

mstauf


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mstauf

As Churchill is refuted as saying, " this is the sort of thing, up with I will not put"

cycokiller


quality posts: 6 Private Messages cycokiller
HomerTime wrote:"These are not the droids you are looking for" is bother fewer words and sounds less goofy then "These are not the droids for which you are looking"



Best argument yet.

4F682120446F6E277420746F756368206D652074686572652100

Slydon


quality posts: 17 Private Messages Slydon

Staff

HomerTime wrote:
"These are not the droids you are looking for" is bother fewer words and sounds less goofy then "These are not the droids for which you are looking"



Well, it was a long time ago. Possibly this rule was invented to stop elegant Jedi mind tricks?

Hi, I'm one of the writers. My powers are limited but I'll do what I can.

dmkraig


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dmkraig

It's totally wrong. Ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I shall not put!

kenney9226


quality posts: 6 Private Messages kenney9226

A sentence is a great thing to put a preposition at the end of.

glawen


quality posts: 0 Private Messages glawen

John Dryden, the English poet (1631-1700) who wrote the first important prescriptive grammar of English, was the one dude whose idea this was, based, as has been said below, on the nonsensical idea that Latin was the ultimate language from which all other European languages were descended (and "corrupted"). In most cases, it's not really a preposition, but a sort of vestigial relic of much older English, similar to the German separable prefix. This material may be on the midterm, so wake up back there.

vigaglumr


quality posts: 0 Private Messages vigaglumr
dmkraig wrote:It's totally wrong. Ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I shall not put!



Misquoting Winston Churchill without attribution is a more serious violation than the affection that he wouldn't put up with.

Debra H


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Debra H
caroro93morgan wrote:That reminds me of a good joke... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5gicGY7hzU



I knew it as a joke about a baseball player asking, "Where's that pitch at?" He was corrected this way, "Where's that pitch at, a$$hole?"