WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Poll: Has the avalanche of licensed playsets taken the imagination out of LEGO?
  • 39.8% - Yeah, it's not really about building anymore 1297
  • 40.5% - Not necessarily, you can still take it in your own direction if you want 1318
  • 19.7% - Hell no! LEGO Batman and Star Wars and Harry Potter and Hobbit are awesome 642
3257 votes

Well, how do you fare compared to the Zeitgeist? Chat up your fellow wooters and let us know how lame this poll was or what obvious choices we missed. For example: Was this poll a) STUPID, b) DUMB, c) POINTLESS or d) ALL OF THE ABOVE?

jclark


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jclark

I was thrilled with the Star Wars Lego. I had no problems with the DC Comics Lego, they were an established iconic property. The Indiana Jones sets I figured just came along with the LucasArts licensing that gave them Star Wars. The Pixar sets made sense, they were iconic, kid-friendly properties. LOTR, sure, alignment with a core demographic, perfect sense. I started to get worried with the Pirates of the Caribbean sets. I started smelling "Oops, we over-committed to Disney to get the Pixar licenses and now we're in trouble." But when I saw the Lone Ranger sets at Target, I threw up in my mouth a little.

Boxymoron


quality posts: 4 Private Messages Boxymoron

To answer the question, I thiink that it's more that we have lost our creativity and critical thinking.

Also, I wish they would release the different colors they use. Like, for instance, the Mega Blocks with Halo, wish they would release their old tan cam blocks in large sets.

Totally would have built a Mammoth Tank from the first C&C had I had enough pieces to build it with... ):

cebii


quality posts: 3 Private Messages cebii

my son follows the instructions once, then takes it apart and puts the pieces in with the rest, to make his own spaceships and battlefields later on.

lotsofgoats


quality posts: 3 Private Messages lotsofgoats

If you want it to be about building, get an Erector Set or something. If you want it to be about following instructions, understanding how components fit together, and then imagining your little vehicle flying around and shooting things and then breaking and then figuring out how to put it back together... well I think those are all good things, yea?

olperfesser


quality posts: 2 Private Messages olperfesser

It's all about the Benjamins... What they can sell, not what you can create.

triplebud


quality posts: 2 Private Messages triplebud

This is like saying GI Joe and He Man were not fun because they had personalities instead of being generic army men or action figures. Have you seen the spreads these kids put together and then create a full Batman movie better than the current crap on 3-D screens around the world?
Amazing. I WISH I had lego sets that included all the cartoons and movies I loved.
ET legos when you were that age... SERIOUS?! My head would have exploded.

noodle192000


quality posts: 0 Private Messages noodle192000

You can still get basic, non-licensed Lego sets. It's not like the licensed sets are all they are making.
I'm lucky enough to live somewhat near a Lego store, too. :-) I hope my son will like them when he gets older...right now he's not even Duplo age.

HomerTime


quality posts: 1 Private Messages HomerTime
cebii wrote:my son follows the instructions once, then takes it apart and puts the pieces in with the rest, to make his own spaceships and battlefields later on.



Same here with my son. Yes, he likes the mini-figs, but they are always being played with in environments he constructs from his imagination. I think most people who claim the playsets are killing creativity are making a false assumption on what they *think* kids are doing, not how kids are really playing with them.

My main complaint is that Lego only makes most mini-figs available in the playsets. My son probably has more than enough bricks to build almost anything he could imagine, so playsets are only attractive for the mini-figures. Sorry son, but I am not going to buy a $100 Jabba's palace so you can get the Bib Fortuna mini-fig.

jtmacc99


quality posts: 2 Private Messages jtmacc99

My son digs the sets because they do look really cool when they are done. He hasn't gone off on his own yet to make different things out of them, but I'm sure he will in time.

The real problem (for my wallet) is the announcement of Lego Simpsons in 2014.

It's pretty easy for me to firmly say "NO" when he casually asks if we can get the $70 Lego City Fire Department set.

It will not be so easy when he asks if we can get the $70 Burns Mansion set that comes with Mr. Burns, Flanders, and the Hounds.

3blindmice


quality posts: 0 Private Messages 3blindmice

Legos have always been fairly expensive, but you used to get a lot of diversity in the sets with the large number and relative simplicity of parts. With the castle and the tall ship sets you started to see a shift away from building from basics, but you still got enough parts that you could do something else creatively with a single set.

What I've seen is a trend toward larger fancier precast parts which really limits what else you can do with them. Hopefully that trend will reverse itself over time.

Moueska


quality posts: 54 Private Messages Moueska

My kid and I love the Imaginext DVD's, so I don't mind the liscensing so much. I would totally get my kid ALL of the lego playsets just to play Lego LOTR with him. XD

But, unfortunately, I can't afford the hobbit hole until he's of age anyway.

5 is too young for the teeny Legos, isn't it?

sparklecoogs


quality posts: 1 Private Messages sparklecoogs

I'm pretty sure price has "taken the imagination" out of LEGO. If you've never been to a LEGO store, try it sometime. You'll get to witness the soul-crushing moment when a wide-eyed child takes his/her favorite set off the shelf and reads the sticker price.

sheilasu


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sheilasu
cebii wrote:my son follows the instructions once, then takes it apart and puts the pieces in with the rest, to make his own spaceships and battlefields later on.



My 8 year old grandson has every toy going, it seems, but his favorites are the Lego sets...the only problem for me is the price - each time we go into the Lego Store I almost have a massive coronary - $100. + for a few pieces of plastic!! I must say, though, that he absolutely loves playing with the pieces - he keeps them separate for awhile, then the pieces all get put together, and he makes towns, villages, vehicles, etc...it does help that he already has a wonderful imagination!

jenniferbreuer4


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jenniferbreuer4
sheilasu wrote:My 8 year old grandson has every toy going, it seems, but his favorites are the Lego sets...the only problem for me is the price - each time we go into the Lego Store I almost have a massive coronary - $100. + for a few pieces of plastic!! I must say, though, that he absolutely loves playing with the pieces - he keeps them separate for awhile, then the pieces all get put together, and he makes towns, villages, vehicles, etc...it does help that he already has a wonderful imagination!



Last Christmas I was looking for Lego toys for my nephews and they were very, very expensive. I came across a site (I don't remember what that site was) that gave coupons out for another site called the plastic brick. I found a couple good deals for the kids and purchased them (that was in 2012). I don't want to say the sets were "used" but they were from other people exchanging them. I decided how "used" could a Lego setup be and I was very satisfied with what I received and so were the boys. Just a suggestion because they are very expensive.

bogus


quality posts: 11 Private Messages bogus
3blindmice wrote:Legos have always been fairly expensive, but you used to get a lot of diversity in the sets with the large number and relative simplicity of parts. With the castle and the tall ship sets you started to see a shift away from building from basics, but you still got enough parts that you could do something else creatively with a single set.

What I've seen is a trend toward larger fancier precast parts which really limits what else you can do with them. Hopefully that trend will reverse itself over time.



This is my gripe too. I grew out of Legos years ago (well mostly...hehe) but most all of the sets I see on shelves look to contain >50 percent specialized parts that are only really going to be useful for that particular set or theme.

But it does bug me that so much of their stuff is licensed. Part of the fun of Lego is/was that you could create your own fantasy world, not live in someone else's.

jditzler


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jditzler

My grandsons have an extremely large collection of the play sets. When they receive one as a gift, they assemble it and play with it for a day or two, then the imagination comes out and they take it apart and use pieces from everything and build what they design/dream. Grandma saved the Legos that my son had back in the late 70s, there was a storage tote full and then some. The boys love getting into those pieces to complete their designs. Space ships, Shuttle craft, boats, airplanes, tanks and what ever they can conger up. We live just a few blocks away and they will ride their bikes over to our house to get that one special piece out of the old Legos to complete their project! Legos are one of the most ingenious toys (I hesitate to call them toys) that were every designed and offered on the market. Oh, I almost forgot, my youngest grandson has attended several robotic camps at UNO, SAC museum and Creighton University and loves the large robotic building sets from Lego, ,I wish I could afford them for my boys, they are amazing.