WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

NatureMill Composters

I don't know about you, but my city charges me roughly triple to haul away my trash as opposed to the compost bin. Luckily for me, they'll compost just about anything. But you don't have to want to stick it to BIG GOVERNMENT, you can compost and put your leavings to work in your garden, too!
NatureMill official site

Manki


quality posts: 2 Private Messages Manki

I have a juicer that creates a lot of pulp and I know it would be great for composting. Does anyone out there actually compost so they can tell me why I should do it?


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estitabarnak


quality posts: 2 Private Messages estitabarnak
Manki wrote:I have a juicer that creates a lot of pulp and I know it would be great for composting. Does anyone out there actually compost so they can tell me why I should do it?



Why you compost is really up to you, but a few good ones include:

Environmental reasons: Food waste can be composted. If your municipality doesn't offer composting, then all that food goes to the landfill where it gets buried and has a hard time decomposing (not a lot of light or oxygen under a ton of other refuse). When decomposition /does/ happen in that environment, it generates a lot of methane (a very potent greenhouse gas). In any case, since food waste can be turned in to something useful, it's a big waste of limited landfill space. It's like throwing away your recycling

Economic reasons: Food waste can be turned in to a product that's directly useful. If you're buying mulch, potting soil, or other organic soil amendments you can offset at least part of that by composting food waste (and yard waste!) Granted, there are lots of ways to compost; if you spend a few hundred dollars to get a bin like one of these, I doubt you'll work up a net economic benefit. But that that brings us to reason three:

It's neat!: This can be a fun experiment for you and/or your family. You can also have some fun much more cheaply (granted not as space-efficiently and neatly) using a bin or two and worms.

Hope that's something to think about!

mnm039


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mnm039

I got this exact ceramic countertop composter from World Market for $15.00

Manki


quality posts: 2 Private Messages Manki
estitabarnak wrote:Why you compost is really up to you, but a few good ones include:

Environmental reasons: Food waste can be composted. If your municipality doesn't offer composting, then all that food goes to the landfill where it gets buried and has a hard time decomposing (not a lot of light or oxygen under a ton of other refuse). When decomposition /does/ happen in that environment, it generates a lot of methane (a very potent greenhouse gas). In any case, since food waste can be turned in to something useful, it's a big waste of limited landfill space. It's like throwing away your recycling

Economic reasons: Food waste can be turned in to a product that's directly useful. If you're buying mulch, potting soil, or other organic soil amendments you can offset at least part of that by composting food waste (and yard waste!) Granted, there are lots of ways to compost; if you spend a few hundred dollars to get a bin like one of these, I doubt you'll work up a net economic benefit. But that that brings us to reason three:

It's neat!: This can be a fun experiment for you and/or your family. You can also have some fun much more cheaply (granted not as space-efficiently and neatly) using a bin or two and worms.

Hope that's something to think about!



Thank you that was really insightful. I'd rather compost than let my garbage take up space, so I like that part a lot. I'm also curious about those worms haha.


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JonnyA


quality posts: 2 Private Messages JonnyA
Manki wrote:Thank you that was really insightful. I'd rather compost than let my garbage take up space, so I like that part a lot. I'm also curious about those worms haha.



Another small-ish benefit: your trash won't smell anywhere near as bad as it does now. You can throw almost any food in these things, so your trash becomes mostly non-organic. Though these composters do get a bit stinky for a while if you throw in fish bits.

I hear you can toss in cat litter as well, as long as the litter is compostable. Most compostable cat litters probably qualify as a "brown", so the litter should reduce the amount of sawdust pellets that are needed to balance the food scraps.

Pulp from a juicer should work well, as long as it's not tomatoes or citrus (including citrus peels). Those are two of the handful of foods that are best kept out of these composters, because the high acidity makes the mix less hospitable to the composting bacteria. But a small amount here and there should be fine. Maybe you can add extra baking soda to compensate, but in my mind it would be too much effort to try to balance the pH.

Also steer clear of hard items like banana stalks or even grape stems. They might jam the aerator arm if they're big, and they probably won't break down much in a few weeks.

See my earlier review for more thoughts:

http://home.woot.com/Forums/viewpost.aspx?postid=5004096

bjoslow


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bjoslow

I've had mine for several years and love it. It's a bit noisy so put it outside. I put that composted material in my big composter with the stuff that won't fit in the naturemill.

strummer00


quality posts: 3 Private Messages strummer00

Love the idea of these, but may want to check out Amazon first:
Ceramic models are a bit cheaper

Ultras seem to have issues

Woot Tang Clan


quality posts: 27 Private Messages Woot Tang Clan

I bought one for my brother and he tried it for 2 weeks and stopped using it. No particular reason why, so I am going to take it back and try using it myself once I move into a house.

DarthNinja


quality posts: 10 Private Messages DarthNinja

Seems to be there are a lot of people unhappy with the Ultra and NatureMill's support on the amazon.com page


Also, I just noticed that Woot has the Ceramic ones for $29.99, Meanwhile they're $24.29 on Amazon... with prime shipping:
www.amazon.com/Norpro-Gallon-Ceramic-Compost-Keeper/dp/B001FB59X6

Bog of carp anyone?

jeraden


quality posts: 4 Private Messages jeraden

I got one of these off Woot several years ago when they were a regular Woot item. I used it for a while but to be honest it was just too much hassle. It got fairly stinky at times. Often times the turning mechanism would get stuck, so I had to dig my hands in to scrape off whatever "dirt" got overly dried and caked onto the bottom. The collection bin on the bottom frequently got very moldy and gross after a while. Like the stuff just stunk when you went to use it. I know people will say I didn't have the correct balance of green to brown material, but that's not always easy to maintain depending on what you eat and you don't always want to have to babysit it and stress over whether you are putting in the right mix of stuff.
While it did produce compost, in my opinion it wasn't worth all the hassle vs. just going out to buy a bag of compost when needed.

It's been sitting in my garage unused for a while, as it was too expensive to throw away, but there isn't really a good market for a used one since it's impossible to really get "clean" after it's been in use for a while.

peetyweety


quality posts: 0 Private Messages peetyweety

Composting is an important part of the food chain. Other people have explained it pretty well. I'm checking this thing out. But if you don't want to spend the money and buy something else on woot, I usually freeze my compost and take it to my local farmers market, once a week, where they take compost. I live in a big city, so it might be different where you live. Usually community gardens will take your compost, because it will help create extremely fertile soil.
I freeze it so it doesn't create odors or bugs, and it's easier to deal with frozen, when I'm traveling with it, to drop it off.

Manki wrote:I have a juicer that creates a lot of pulp and I know it would be great for composting. Does anyone out there actually compost so they can tell me why I should do it?



pfurse


quality posts: 0 Private Messages pfurse

I bought one of the original ones. Worst working device ever. Constant jams, cheap metal parts that would snap and don't believe that odorless claim for a second. It wreaked... had to go in the garage. Furthermore, the heater would bake compost onto the sides of the machine making cleaning and clearing jams difficult. I literally had to chisel some of the garbage out and once had to completely disassemble. I finally gave up and unplugged it for the past three+ years, but can't bring myself to throw it away because of the price I paid for it.

pfurse


quality posts: 0 Private Messages pfurse

Those things are a total racket.

clairelaporte


quality posts: 0 Private Messages clairelaporte

I bought one of the original models. The unit has metal into foam. It does not take much resistance to damage the turning mechanism. It took them 1 full year to replace it. They told me it was a design flaw. One yr. later I was told it was resolved. They sent me a new one. It lasted 2 months before it broke again. Customer service is non existent. Buy a tumbler and save your money. Great idea but cheaply made. So in 2 yrs. I was able to use my unit for less then 3 months total. Save your money.

gjhall99


quality posts: 0 Private Messages gjhall99

I have an Ultra. Poor quality. Metal arm snapped that rotates the compost and mfg had no replacement parts - out of stock - with no eta on when they would.

The one I bought worked ok for about 2 months - but for $250+ there is no huge gain on quality, time saving or stress compared to many other composters that don't require electricity to function.

I have 2 other composters outside (one that looks like a large green ball) and other basic square - they work great with no headache.