Zape


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Zape
tadef wrote:I want a box that will allow me to eliminate either: a) all three current boxes (one is a DVR) or b) eliminate the two "slave" boxes and just have the DVR. But I don't want it to be wireless. I don't care about watching TV on my computer. My house is all prewired for the TVs at their locations, so I want to be able to run the signal through the existing wiring.

Does this exist? (UVerse btw)



MOCA
http://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-Ethernet-Adapter-Service-ECB2500CK01/dp/B008EQ4BQG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1383670145&sr=8-1&keywords=moca
is the solution to let you use coax lines for networking in your house.

Depending on your home wiring, powerline might be a faster and cheaper solution.
http://www.amazon.com/ZyXEL-Powerline-Gigabit-Wall-plug-PLA4225KIT/dp/B0061308MA/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1383670305&sr=8-5&keywords=powerline+networking

hugehead83


quality posts: 6 Private Messages hugehead83
tadef wrote:I want a box that will allow me to eliminate either: a) all three current boxes (one is a DVR) or b) eliminate the two "slave" boxes and just have the DVR. But I don't want it to be wireless. I don't care about watching TV on my computer. My house is all prewired for the TVs at their locations, so I want to be able to run the signal through the existing wiring.

Does this exist? (UVerse btw)



ATT Uverse is an IPTV solution; the HDHR will not work for you.

If you had a cable provider that uses cablecards, then it could do exactly what you need.
By "prewired" do you mean RG59/6 Coax, or CAT5/6? If you have "smart" TVs with ethernet run to them, then you would be able to access the HDHR from those TVs. If you just have coax, you would still need a network component to bridge the two (e.g. WMC "extender", android dongle, etc.).

RogerDucky


quality posts: 2 Private Messages RogerDucky
rydethis wrote:What if you don't have cable? or a flat screen tv? I have an old boxy tv. I plan to get a flat screen one day though. I only have internet and I watch all my shows the day after on Hulu on my laptop. Can someone explain all this is laymen terms? I have no idea what some of yall are saying.



This thing needs cable service, a "M" cable card from the cable company, and a computer. Since you have no cable service, then this won't work for you.

eastcobbler


quality posts: 9 Private Messages eastcobbler

I love my dual-tuner, but maybe y'all can help with a tech question. I can only record one program at a time. If both tuners are recording, the programs are pixelated and garbled as if there isn't enough processing power. Any tips?
I'm doing this on a laptop with Windows Media Center.

eastcobbler


quality posts: 9 Private Messages eastcobbler

Any other cheapguys using one for stictly over-the-air? Jimmy Fallon and PBS gets me by, and then I highly recommend JetFlicks for various other programming.

L4m3r


quality posts: 11 Private Messages L4m3r
tadef wrote:I want a box that will allow me to eliminate either: a) all three current boxes (one is a DVR) or b) eliminate the two "slave" boxes and just have the DVR. But I don't want it to be wireless. I don't care about watching TV on my computer. My house is all prewired for the TVs at their locations, so I want to be able to run the signal through the existing wiring.

Does this exist? (UVerse btw)



U-Verse doesn't use Cablecard, so this device isn't particularly useful to you unless you feel like switching to cable or FIOS.

This device sends the video stream over the network, so you'd need to be wired with Ethernet to reach your TVs. I'm not sure what your existing wiring is with U-Verse.

ONE OF THESE DAYS, I'M GOING TO CUT YOU INTO LITTLE PIECES.

nexusheli


quality posts: 0 Private Messages nexusheli
RogerDucky wrote:This thing needs cable service, a "M" cable card from the cable company, and a computer. Since you have no cable service, then this won't work for you.



Not true; you can use it with a digital antenna. Personally I don't think it's really worth it for OTA channels, but to each their own.

iwantamonkey


quality posts: 5 Private Messages iwantamonkey
jcl945 wrote:I would recommend not doing this over wireless, so you will need a network line from your router to your basement, and have it connected to a device that supports dlna (no premium channels) or a windows media extender (xbox 360).



"I would recommend not doing this over wireless"
>>>>>Ok, why not?

"you will need a network line from your router to your basement"
>>>>>If I need to install a line, why shouldn't I just run a cable line to my TV?

"have it connected to a device that supports dlna ... or a windows media extender (xbox 360)"
>>>>>I don't have an XBox or PS. Nor do I want one.

cycokiller


quality posts: 6 Private Messages cycokiller

I bought my first HDHomeRun tuner in May of 2009. It was the old white dual-tuner model that looked like a little router (called the HDHR-US). It's been running every day since the purchase date (no kidding, every day and still running today).

I recently bought a couple of the newer HDHR3-US dual-tuner models right here off woot! so I could increase the tuner capacity on the network. We have 6 or 7 TVs in the house and they all have a computer or similar device connected to them for media streaming so having lots of tuners helps.

We also have a file server for media storage that runs a UPnP/DLNA server called Fuppes. The Win7 PCs that record TV shows move all recorded shows over to a Fuppes share 30 minutes after they finish recording them. This allows any of the non-pc devices on the network to watch recorded TV. Since I have the older style HDHR tuners, the non-pc devices can NOT watch live TV.

Silicondust has been working on adding that into their next generation of tuners according to a lot of testing posts on their forums.

The main points that folks should understand here are these:

1) First and foremost, these are network tuners that require at minimum a computer, with drivers installed, to function correctly. They are not set-top-boxes (at least not in terms of the mainstream definition), they are not DVRs, they are not computers, etc. They accept an OTA antenna signal or a cable signal and produce a stream on your network that a device with drivers can connect to.

2) If you're going to watch TV on a desktop PC or your laptop and not really use this for anything else, go for it. The SD guys have drivers for Windows & Linux that are both easy to install and work fantastic.

3) If you have lots of TVs and want to use this tuner to watch shows on them, you'll need to do a little extra work to get things running satisfactorily.

Wow, that's a long post. Sorry if it was boring.

4F682120446F6E277420746F756368206D652074686572652100

hugehead83


quality posts: 6 Private Messages hugehead83
eastcobbler wrote:I love my dual-tuner, but maybe y'all can help with a tech question. I can only record one program at a time. If both tuners are recording, the programs are pixelated and garbled as if there isn't enough processing power. Any tips?
I'm doing this on a laptop with Windows Media Center.



In short, I think you need a faster PC. If you had an SSD in your PC with an i5/7 CPU on the same gig-E LAN as your dual tuner, it would work fine. Old school platter drives (especially laptops) cannot physically move fast enough to write data for multiple HD shows using the compression specified.

There are many many factors here, but start your troubleshooting with the easiest fixes

TheRaven


quality posts: 10 Private Messages TheRaven
rampman10 wrote:I don't see an HDMI port. How does this interact with the TV in high definition without an HDMI?

Is it only wireless with smart tv's?

I have been looking for something that will allow me to watch my cable or media from my laptop on any tv in my house. Will this do that? Can I use this to send video from my pc to my tv, or only from my tv to my pc?

I would think there would be more devices out there to help with this that would keep people from having to rent whole home dvr's.



This device is a network tuner. You MUST have an Ethernet network in your home and this requires a wired network connection. It allows your Windows Media Center PC (yes Windows 8 works) to receive live TV and act as a DVR.

This does not interact with your TV. Your PC or laptop or similar are what outputs the signal to your TV.

If you have a wireless router on your network, your other PC's can access TV from this wirelessly. NOTE: You don't *NEED* Windows Media Center because this does come with some rudimentary TV Tuning software. With this device you can watch 3 different channels of TV on many different computers.

The main advantages to this are:

1. You don't have to plug this into your PC via USB.
2. You don't have a tuner card to install in your PC.
3. All machines that access your home network can access the TV Signal.
4. You have 3 tuners so you can tune into 3 channels from different PC's at the same time.
5. It supports the MCARD from your cable provider. That's required to tune into multiple channels at the same time.
6. You are saving monthly HD Cable box and HD DVR fees which can easily be well over $20/month.

This what I've used for years and it's fantastic with Windows Media Center on a PC. You can then play back recordings in HD with full surround if your PC's/Laptops support that. You can also hookup Xbox360's as media extenders to your network and watch live TV on them and recorded.

I give this 5 out of 5 stars!

acraigl


quality posts: 56 Private Messages acraigl
ctviggen wrote:Another caveat is that Windows Media Center has some quirks. I've had many different computers and TVs, and all the systems develop a "black screen of death" where the system simply refuses to respond. You have to perform a hard boot. Also, I've yet to figure out how to get my computer to sleep and wake up only to record, then go back to sleep. And I've had the system for years. I'd like to save some power, but I haven't figured out yet how to do it.

Even if the system doesn't develop the "black screen of death", you do have to reboot periodically, every few days usually, else things go awry.



Look for a utility called HDMIYo... I used it to 'fix' the blackscreen... mapped it to a keyboard sequence, then mapped that sequence to a (Harmony) remote button. One-click fix, no reboots needed.

I was not under the impression that this was defect, but an HDMI sync issue for older TVs. This utility refreshes the HDMI connection, and works great for me.

hugehead83


quality posts: 6 Private Messages hugehead83
iwantamonkey wrote:"I would recommend not doing this over wireless"
>>>>>Ok, why not?

"you will need a network line from your router to your basement"
>>>>>If I need to install a line, why shouldn't I just run a cable line to my TV?

"have it connected to a device that supports dlna ... or a windows media extender (xbox 360)"
>>>>>I don't have an XBox or PS. Nor do I want one.



I second avoiding wifi. Unless you're on 802.11ac, I have not seen good quality 1080p transmissions over 802.11n or below.
Running a CAT5/6 cable to your basement instead of RG59/6 would eliminate the need for a cable box rental down there (the basic point of the HDHR).

iwantamonkey


quality posts: 5 Private Messages iwantamonkey
Zape wrote:OK, here is your "Easy" answer:
Hook up a splitter from your cable line to this box and your main cable box. Get your cable company to issue a cable card which slides into this box (never really as easy as it sounds, and working with your cable company is the biggest challenge). Then, if you get good enough wifi use a playstation 3 with this device and you'll be able to watch all of the same shows you can see upstairs. If you don't have good enough wifi, you can use a powerline adapter to accomplish that.
Better
As a better alternative, you can use a powerline adapter (if you can get good throughput) to put this to your PC running Windows Media Center and use an XBOX 360 to play the shows, and you will have a full blown DVR. You would also be able to ditch the cable box upstairs and use an XBOX 360 to watch TV on your main TV.
Best
Ideally, you would like your recording PC to be using your wired gigabit network all the way to the HDHomeRun as 3 streams being watched/recording would be too taxing for wifi and would require good throughput for powerline, so a media center HTPC in the living room with XBOX 360s elsewhere is the best case scenario.



Thank you for breaking it down Barney-style. Having a big purple dinosaur sing it to me would be better, but I'll take what I can get.

I don't have an XBox or a PS. It seems I'll need to buy one.

I don't want to record anything. I just want to watch cable TV in my basement without drilling holes through walls to run any lines.

Ok so: assuming I rent a cable card from my provider and buy a PS3 to act as a receiver, I'll be able to watch cable TV in my basement. Is that correct?

bpbarrette


quality posts: 1 Private Messages bpbarrette
hugehead83 wrote:In short, I think you need a faster PC. If you had an SSD in your PC with an i5/7 CPU on the same gig-E LAN as your dual tuner, it would work fine. Old school platter drives (especially laptops) cannot physically move fast enough to write data for multiple HD shows using the compression specified.

There are many many factors here, but start your troubleshooting with the easiest fixes



Do NOT use an SSD for your recorder storage. Your drive will not last very long if you do that.

cycokiller


quality posts: 6 Private Messages cycokiller
bpbarrette wrote:Do NOT use an SSD for your recorder storage. Your drive will not last very long if you do that.



Yeah, I second this. I had a SSD in a PC running WMC7... we didn't use that one to record shows, but just the pause buffer alone was always running all over the place filling up the drive and whatnot. The whole PC got really slow and started having all sorts of strange issues. Swapped it out for a WD Blue and it's been fine since.

4F682120446F6E277420746F756368206D652074686572652100

hugehead83


quality posts: 6 Private Messages hugehead83
bpbarrette wrote:Do NOT use an SSD for your recorder storage. Your drive will not last very long if you do that.



Yea, that's a downside, but may be the easiest option for a laptop WMC user. I use some 7200rpm in RAID-0.

blaineg


quality posts: 3 Private Messages blaineg
eastcobbler wrote:Any other cheapguys using one for stictly over-the-air? Jimmy Fallon and PBS gets me by, and then I highly recommend JetFlicks for various other programming.



I've got three of the dual tuner models hooked up to the old antenna on the roof for over the air channels. It works great on wired gigabit to four computers running Windows Media Center on Windows 7.

But I'm pondering adding one of these, as sometimes it seems that 6 simultaneous channels aren't enough to go around for my wife & granddaughter!


For those that are still confused, this box simply gives you three TV tuners that are accessible over your home network. You also need a TV signal (over the air antenna or cable) and a computer or game console that can control the tuners.

Simple, right? :-)

In other words, it's a fantastic toy for computer geeks, and mostly useless for everyone else.

Strychnyne


quality posts: 2 Private Messages Strychnyne

Will this work with a Roku?

rydethis


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rydethis
nexusheli wrote:Not true; you can use it with a digital antenna. Personally I don't think it's really worth it for OTA channels, but to each their own.



I have cable internet through the phone line. It has a router and I use the wireless for my tablet and other laptop in the house.

So what I'm getting from the comments is I have to have some form of cable like Comcast or Directtv to use this thing? I'm so confused!!!

Touch me in the morning!!

dhess


quality posts: 10 Private Messages dhess
Zape wrote:MOCA
http://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-Ethernet-Adapter-Service-ECB2500CK01/dp/B008EQ4BQG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1383670145&sr=8-1&keywords=moca
is the solution to let you use coax lines for networking in your house.

Depending on your home wiring, powerline might be a faster and cheaper solution.
http://www.amazon.com/ZyXEL-Powerline-Gigabit-Wall-plug-PLA4225KIT/dp/B0061308MA/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1383670305&sr=8-5&keywords=powerline+networking



I use Powerlines for my house, since the wife hates seeing raceways run across our living room (we're renting, so I can't run cable traditionally.)

tmann05


quality posts: 1 Private Messages tmann05

I've been reading through all this and it sounds like ALOT of work! If you do the setup I have you will wonder why people waste their time downloading or recording anything anymore. I am using Roku's and Playon Software. See my youtube video for more info (sorry about shaky camera)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Elb-1z-Xfew

cmollerstuen


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cmollerstuen

This is for cable TV only. It will not work with satellite TV providers.

comicscars wrote:OK, I'm not sure I understand yet, but will this work with satellite TV provides like Dish or DirectTV? I have Dish.



kevlar51


quality posts: 47 Private Messages kevlar51

I've had this for 3 months now with FIOS, and I've been very happy with it. Especially since my bill has dropped dramatically once I got rid of the DVR and settop boxes.

I'm missing out on OnDemand, but no big deal (Verizon's OnDemand pales in comparison to Comcast's content anyway). I was more worried about the guides and search functionality. Turns out though all of that is better on WMC--so win win! And no more verizon menu pop ups when I turn on my machine.

I've got two 360s set up as WMC extenders. I already had them, so that was nice. And if you have a logitech remote set up to operate the 360, you should have a WMC function on the remote itself, which saves a lot of annoying menu clicks on the xbox.

Occasionally I'll have to reboot the HDHR though, because the picture on live tv will get too pixelated. That's the biggest downside, but only takes about 3 minutes. Sadly, losing the set top boxes also means I've lost my digital clocks. Didn't really see that coming

cmollerstuen


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cmollerstuen

Two things will affect your recording/viewing from a SiliconDust HDHomeRun (HDHR) tuner.

You need enough processing power on your laptop to record both programs, but this likely is not your problem.

You need enough network bandwidth between your HDHR and your laptop for both signals. You might think this is not a problem, but you could be surprised.

The HDHR does not compress the video before sending it on your home network. It sends the raw MPEG-2 encoded stream to your laptop.

Standard Definition MPEG-2 Video: From 2.0 Mbps to 15.00 Mbps
High Definition MPEG-2 Video: From 2.0 Mbps to 29.40 Mbps

I typically see the HDHR sending SD signals at 4-6 Mbps and HD signals at 10 Mbps.

There is also no error correction in the MPEG-2 signals your laptop is getting.

So if you are trying to record 2 channels simultaneously you will need a good, solid, continuous 8-10 Mbps to your laptop. If one or both of the signals is HD, you would need up to 20 Mbps.

If you are using WiFi to connect your laptop to your home network you could be seeing dropped packets and lower speeds than your HDHR and laptop need.

Dropped packets will cause pixelation (no error correction).

You can try connecting your laptop via wired Ethernet to troubleshoot the problem. This might eliminate the pixelation.

I love my HDHR, but cannot watch HD channels on my tablet via WiFi because of the dropped packets.

Cheers.

eastcobbler wrote:I love my dual-tuner, but maybe y'all can help with a tech question. I can only record one program at a time. If both tuners are recording, the programs are pixelated and garbled as if there isn't enough processing power. Any tips?
I'm doing this on a laptop with Windows Media Center.


badhabit12


quality posts: 14 Private Messages badhabit12

BEFORE I GO SEARCHING THE INTERNET .......

does anyone have a link to a forum that Takes you by the hand and explains terminology, concepts, the ins and outs of using this technology and the ultimate goals of using such a system?

All this gear may be obsolete shortly if there are technological upgrades in the works.

Any help would be appreciated.

THANK YOU
BILL

TheRaven


quality posts: 10 Private Messages TheRaven

The following are your network connection alternatives:

BEST - Direct Ethernet connection between your tuner and your Media Center PC (Via switch). You simply connect the tuner to the same switch your Media Center PC is on. I use Gigabit switches but a 100MB switch should be ok even if you're using all three tuners at the same time. I'm using Verizon FIOS as my source.

SECOND BEST - Power Line Network - You can no get higher speed power line network adapters that will run up to 600MB theoretical speed. This speed is affected by your home wiring, fuse box and any power strips you have in line. You will want to remove everything you can that's on the path between the originating adapter and the receiving adapter.

WORST - Wireless - I wouldn't use wireless to your Media Center PC unless it's your one an only device. You can get away with running full HD to one device from the tuner this way. As soon as you try running multiple devices at the same time (multiple tuners active) you are probably going to start experiencing packet loss and the dreaded pixelation/stuttering.

Your best bet on this kind of stuff is to use wired connections to the fastest switches and ports you can.

If you have to move down towards wireless you need to make sure those are your edge devices like your laptop or Xbox360, tablet, phone, etc.

I have everything running wired Ethernet over GB switches except to my bedroom which is running a power line network adapter. I also have my downstairs family room hooked up via a MOCA adapter for the Actiontec FIOS router. If you have FIOS you can use MOCA and normal coax cable. In my case the cable was already run all over the house so this made sense. :-)

Just remember, you are throwing a lot of data around if you're running 3 full HD live channels at the same time.

cmollerstuen wrote:Two things will affect your recording/viewing from a SiliconDust HDHomeRun (HDHR) tuner.

You need enough processing power on your laptop to record both programs, but this likely is not your problem.

You need enough network bandwidth between your HDHR and your laptop for both signals. You might think this is not a problem, but you could be surprised.

The HDHR does not compress the video before sending it on your home network. It sends the raw MPEG-2 encoded stream to your laptop.

Standard Definition MPEG-2 Video: From 2.0 Mbps to 15.00 Mbps
High Definition MPEG-2 Video: From 2.0 Mbps to 29.40 Mbps

I typically see the HDHR sending SD signals at 4-6 Mbps and HD signals at 10 Mbps.

There is also no error correction in the MPEG-2 signals your laptop is getting.

So if you are trying to record 2 channels simultaneously you will need a good, solid, continuous 8-10 Mbps to your laptop. If one or both of the signals is HD, you would need up to 20 Mbps.

If you are using WiFi to connect your laptop to your home network you could be seeing dropped packets and lower speeds than your HDHR and laptop need.

Dropped packets will cause pixelation (no error correction).

You can try connecting your laptop via wired Ethernet to troubleshoot the problem. This might eliminate the pixelation.

I love my HDHR, but cannot watch HD channels on my tablet via WiFi because of the dropped packets.

Cheers.



Zape


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Zape
iwantamonkey wrote:Thank you for breaking it down Barney-style. Having a big purple dinosaur sing it to me would be better, but I'll take what I can get.

I don't have an XBox or a PS. It seems I'll need to buy one.

I don't want to record anything. I just want to watch cable TV in my basement without drilling holes through walls to run any lines.

Ok so: assuming I rent a cable card from my provider and buy a PS3 to act as a receiver, I'll be able to watch cable TV in my basement. Is that correct?



Yes.... provided you have REALLY good wireless. Otherwise the powerline networking comes into play and then this just gets more expensive. Some blu-ray players can get most of the channels(via DLNA) so the PS3 might not be an absolute necessity. The good news, with PS4s coming out, PS3 prices have been dropping.

I Love SiliconDust, SiliconDust loves me...........

TheRaven


quality posts: 10 Private Messages TheRaven

I've been running a Windows 7 Professional system with Windows Media Center for years with this tuner and have never had this issue and never have had to reboot ever few days.

I've recently installed it on a new Alienware X51 R2 machine in my living room and the same thing. No issue like described above. I don't have to reboot it. But then again, it's only running WMC and nothing else. I also never have it turn off. It's always on. Never sleeping.

I have my Logitech Harmony Once remote setup to never turn it off. I just hit the stop button to stop live TV from running constantly.

ctviggen wrote:Another caveat is that Windows Media Center has some quirks. I've had many different computers and TVs, and all the systems develop a "black screen of death" where the system simply refuses to respond. You have to perform a hard boot. Also, I've yet to figure out how to get my computer to sleep and wake up only to record, then go back to sleep. And I've had the system for years. I'd like to save some power, but I haven't figured out yet how to do it.

Even if the system doesn't develop the "black screen of death", you do have to reboot periodically, every few days usually, else things go awry.



Crab


quality posts: 48 Private Messages Crab
Strychnyne wrote:Will this work with a Roku?



Someone please answer this. If I hook this up to my PC, can I use my Roku to watch shows on my TV?

cycokiller


quality posts: 6 Private Messages cycokiller

Man, it's funny how many posts keep asking the same questions over and over. Read people! Also, every question that has been asked is answered right on the SiliconDust website between the main product page and the "learn more" page. No joke.. every question. Lichme has the product page link in the first post.. the learn more link is on the right side of that page under the picture of the tuner.

Interestingly enough, the learn more page actually states that this prime unit does not work with antennas. Seems like some posts have mentioned they use OTA antennas, but are they using this prime tuner, or the standard tuners and mistaking them for this one???

Also: this is all available on the "specs" tab right here on woot! if you don't want to go all the way over to the mfg site. Just look around.

4F682120446F6E277420746F756368206D652074686572652100

cycokiller


quality posts: 6 Private Messages cycokiller
Crab wrote:Someone please answer this. If I hook this up to my PC, can I use my Roku to watch shows on my TV?



It will.. but will most likely require a third-party channel and/or software like Plex or another UPnP/DLNA client/server. Some of those applications also require you to run parts on a computer also... so additional hardware may be needed as well.

4F682120446F6E277420746F756368206D652074686572652100

scoot


quality posts: 0 Private Messages scoot

silicondust.com go to the forums for a lot of answers. Some general comments

1) You DO NOT need a computer unless you are recording. Caveat, your TV must be a Smart TV with an app that handles DLNA with an ethernet connection. I have both Samsung and LG TVs that work just fine. On my hacked Nook with Android on it and my phone behavior is so-so. Waiting on the real app.

2) Assume you will need to be hardwired. If your WiFi signal is weak or interrupted you will get pixelation and/or sound dropouts.

3) As far as I know there is no way to "connect directly through your Xbox 360..." as it says "It can". Yes, PlayStation 3 can be directly connected. Xbox must connect thru a PC.

4) This is not a guaranteed magical plugin box but it might work that way for you. If you are tech adverse forget it.

I have two of the off the air two tuner boxes and one of these. I can record up to 7 shows at once. Yes, I have a high-end computer with lots of storage and memory. I think the most I have recorded simultaneously is 5 shows.

If you have a little box that can handle DLNA it might work. See the Silicondust forums for other peoples experiences. Boxes that "should" work frequently don't.

fphredd


quality posts: 0 Private Messages fphredd
kevlar51 wrote:I've had this for 3 months now with FIOS, and I've been very happy with it. Especially since my bill has dropped dramatically once I got rid of the DVR and settop boxes.

I'm missing out on OnDemand, but no big deal (Verizon's OnDemand pales in comparison to Comcast's content anyway). I was more worried about the guides and search functionality. Turns out though all of that is better on WMC--so win win! And no more verizon menu pop ups when I turn on my machine.

I've got two 360s set up as WMC extenders. I already had them, so that was nice. And if you have a logitech remote set up to operate the 360, you should have a WMC function on the remote itself, which saves a lot of annoying menu clicks on the xbox.

Occasionally I'll have to reboot the HDHR though, because the picture on live tv will get too pixelated. That's the biggest downside, but only takes about 3 minutes. Sadly, losing the set top boxes also means I've lost my digital clocks. Didn't really see that coming



Been having a heckuva time hooking this up with FIOS and win7 media center...any hints? Thanks!

scoot


quality posts: 0 Private Messages scoot
fphredd wrote:Been having a heckuva time hooking this up with FIOS and win7 media center...any hints? Thanks!



Go to the Silicondust forums there's plenty of knowledgeable people there that have gone thru probably every problem scenario that exists. I have also had mine for months and it's recording probably 30-50 programs a week.

kevlar51


quality posts: 47 Private Messages kevlar51
fphredd wrote:Been having a heckuva time hooking this up with FIOS and win7 media center...any hints? Thanks!



I guess for starters, was your cablecard properly activated with Verizon?

TheRaven


quality posts: 10 Private Messages TheRaven
scoot wrote:Go to the Silicondust forums there's plenty of knowledgeable people there that have gone thru probably every problem scenario that exists. I have also had mine for months and it's recording probably 30-50 programs a week.


You absolutely have to get your MCARD authorized and setup through Verizon. This requires someone from Verizon to activate it. They needed specific information that you can get from the Silicon Dust tools. I would have to look at mine again to tell you exactly what you need to provide to them (I'm not at home right now) but they do have to authorize the MCARD.

An installer came out to my house with the MCARD and some Verizon software tools and we worked through it. Same at my daughter's house.

After that, smooth sailing.

mcahren


quality posts: 6 Private Messages mcahren

I'm thinking of picking this up, and ditching my Whole-House DVR. Please validate my thought process:

I currently pay ~$500 per year for Verizon Fios whole-house DVR and cable boxes (yikes!).

Our main computer is fairly new and robust. I downgraded the OS to Win7 with WMC.

We currently have one XBOX 360, so I would need to another XBOX for the upstairs TV. I expect XBOX 360s be show up on CL fairly cheap this winter. We have a third TV in our bedroom, but we don't watch it much.. Can I use a chromecast or roku to view recorded programs via DLNA, and use OTA for live TV?

I'm a little concerned about relying on using the XBOX just to watch TV. I don't want to have to navigate a bunch of XBOX menus, that wouldn't pass the wife test. Is there a workaround for this?

I'm also concerned about latency when surfing channels. Is that an issue?

How is the DVR experience with the XBOX? Specifically, searching the EPG, scheduling shows and seasons? parusing and viewing the recorded shows? Skipping forward and backward?

Can I use our Harmony with the XBOX?

My Fios router is a measly 10/100, but I think I could put a gigabit hub in the media closet and connect the computer, tuner, and downstairs xbox all together with very little effort. Connecting the upstairs TV is another issue, could I use a powerline ethernet kit, or would I have to run a copper drop (not easy)?

TheRaven


quality posts: 10 Private Messages TheRaven

You will ABSOLUTEY save a TON of money doing this! This is exactly the reason I did mine.

Windows 7 with Media Center is really not a "downgrade" for this. I tried doing it on my Windows 8 Pro machine with Media Center and it was buggy and didn't support many of the addons for Media Center that are available. So, you did the right first step. :-)

All you need are Xbox360's in each room if you want the full Media Center experience.

You can set the xbox's to boot directly into Windows Media center to pass the wife test! That's what I did. You can also either use an xbox remote or a Logitech Harmony One like I do and you'll have all your normal dvr controls on a regular remote. Again, passes the wife test!

The Xbox360 has the exact same interface as you have on your PC. It's basically just a Remote Desktop client that runs Windows Media center to the xbox's. So, it's the same guide, recorded tv, everything. It also passes the wife test!

There is no real latency IF you make sure everything is wired and you're wired to a GB switch. Please realize that the WAN connection (your Actiontec FIOS Router) doesn't play a part in this if you just wire all your machines to a GB switch for your home network. The HD HOMERUN PRIME Tuner gets the signal from FIOS Coax. From there the connections that count are between the tuner and the machines (especially the Windows Media Center PC). You want those to be as fast as possible. I wired all my computers to the GB switch with a single line coming out of the Actiontec router for WAN access. Works wonderfully.

If you can't do that all the way to the bedroom, I highly recommend the Power Line network adapters. That's what I use to the bedroom.

Or, if you have COAX already run to the bedroom, you can get yourself a MOCA adapter from Amazon and use that instead and it will be full speed. If you had a DVR upstairs, you have the coax already run. You would just plug the coax into this adapter and then take Ethernet out to your Xbox360 and poof.. full speed network.

This is the one I got and it works perfectly with FIOS. I have it running downstairs.

http://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-Ethernet-Adapter-Service-ECB2500C/dp/B008C1JC4O/

If you have any more questions, just ask me as I've had this setup for well over a year now. You can contact me at https://plus.google.com/+RobertLindabury/posts

mcahren wrote:I'm thinking of picking this up, and ditching my Whole-House DVR. Please validate my thought process:

I currently pay ~$500 per year for Verizon Fios whole-house DVR and cable boxes (yikes!).

Our main computer is fairly new and robust. I downgraded the OS to Win7 with WMC.

We currently have one XBOX 360, so I would need to another XBOX for the upstairs TV. I expect XBOX 360s be show up on CL fairly cheap this winter. We have a third TV in our bedroom, but we don't watch it much.. Can I use a chromecast or roku to view recorded programs via DLNA, and use OTA for live TV?

I'm a little concerned about relying on using the XBOX just to watch TV. I don't want to have to navigate a bunch of XBOX menus, that wouldn't pass the wife test. Is there a workaround for this?

I'm also concerned about latency when surfing channels. Is that an issue?

How is the DVR experience with the XBOX? Specifically, searching the EPG, scheduling shows and seasons? parusing and viewing the recorded shows? Skipping forward and backward?

Can I use our Harmony with the XBOX?

My Fios router is a measly 10/100, but I think I could put a gigabit hub in the media closet and connect the computer, tuner, and downstairs xbox all together with very little effort. Connecting the upstairs TV is another issue, could I use a powerline ethernet kit, or would I have to run a copper drop (not easy)?

kevlar51


quality posts: 47 Private Messages kevlar51
mcahren wrote:I'm thinking of picking this up, and ditching my Whole-House DVR. Please validate my thought process:

I currently pay ~$500 per year for Verizon Fios whole-house DVR and cable boxes (yikes!).

Our main computer is fairly new and robust. I downgraded the OS to Win7 with WMC.

We currently have one XBOX 360, so I would need to another XBOX for the upstairs TV. I expect XBOX 360s be show up on CL fairly cheap this winter. We have a third TV in our bedroom, but we don't watch it much.. Can I use a chromecast or roku to view recorded programs via DLNA, and use OTA for live TV?

I'm a little concerned about relying on using the XBOX just to watch TV. I don't want to have to navigate a bunch of XBOX menus, that wouldn't pass the wife test. Is there a workaround for this?

I'm also concerned about latency when surfing channels. Is that an issue?

How is the DVR experience with the XBOX? Specifically, searching the EPG, scheduling shows and seasons? parusing and viewing the recorded shows? Skipping forward and backward?

Can I use our Harmony with the XBOX?

My Fios router is a measly 10/100, but I think I could put a gigabit hub in the media closet and connect the computer, tuner, and downstairs xbox all together with very little effort. Connecting the upstairs TV is another issue, could I use a powerline ethernet kit, or would I have to run a copper drop (not easy)?



Harmony works awesome with 360, and will give you a WMC button to go straight to the WMC center on the xbox (for the wife). The old white 360 media remotes also have a button for this, but the new compact black remotes don't.

Like others here, I have a moca set up, which relies on existing coaxial cable around the house to take the place of ethernet. I bought a few used actiontec routers on ebay and have them set up around the house as network connections where I need them.