WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Nikon 16.1MP 42x Optical Digital Camera

Speed to First Woot:
3m 53.443s
First Sucker:
ghubbs
Last Wooter to Woot:
shahr4md
Last Purchase:
9 months ago
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Quality Posts


sucker4crap


quality posts: 20 Private Messages sucker4crap

Does this have a charging port that you can use an external battery pack to use/charge?

I see that it uses a non-standard USB cable (not a mini or micro), that you can find everywhere, but a propitiatory cable & battery, which...stinks.


conanthelibrarian


quality posts: 3492 Private Messages conanthelibrarian

Check out additional info and lots of great reviews on the product page and tons of great reviews (4.5 out of 5.0) over at bhphotovideo.com


dliidlii1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dliidlii1

I might have bought this if I hadn't just purchased the Nikon P500(only a 36X zoom)for $79 used from Amazon.

vatchman


quality posts: 7 Private Messages vatchman
dliidlii1 wrote:I might have bought this if I hadn't just purchased the Nikon P500(only a 36X zoom)for $79 used from Amazon.



you got a great deal!

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100

While this has the heft of an SLR, keep in mind that this is "only" a bridge camera, and not a full SLR. For those who don't know, these models "bridge" the gap between point-and-shoots and true SLRs, taking many of the best features of both. Those looking for the versatility and power of an SLR need to look elsewhere. For example, this only stores photos in JPG. Many serious photographers prefer RAW, which stores the image with no compression and minimal processing. That said, this has some amazing features for the price, and is probably one of the best bridge cameras out there.

Highlights include: Great optical zoom, a Backside Illuminated (BSI) sensor for better lowlight performance, and full 1080p with stereo sound (you'd be surprised by the number of cameras that only capture mono). My biggest gripe is that it uses the outdated Mac-centric MOV container for videos. Virtually all mid-to-high end cameras now use MP4. MOV is problematic because it's not well-supported in Windows (just as Window's very popular AVI [and less popular WMV] causes problems in Macs). In fact, I know of no FREE Windows editing program that supports MOV successfully. It was major marketing blunder for Nikon to choose MOV since >85% of computer owners use Windows, and MP4 is supported by both OSs. In fact, choosing MOV was one of the reasons Kodak's handheld camcorders never sold well.

That said, this is an excellent camera for those who need advanced features but don't mind the bulk of an SLR.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100

Mursenary


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Mursenary
sdc100 wrote:While this has the heft of an SLR, keep in mind that this is "only" a bridge camera, and not a full SLR. For those who don't know, these models "bridge" the gap between point-and-shoots and true SLRs, taking many of the best features of both. Those looking for the versatility and power of an SLR need to look elsewhere. For example, this only stores photos in JPG. Many serious photographers prefer RAW, which stores the image with no compression and minimal processing. That said, this has some amazing features for the price, and is probably one of the best bridge cameras out there.

Highlights include: Great optical zoom, a Backside Illuminated (BSI) sensor for better lowlight performance, and full 1080p with stereo sound (you'd be surprised by the number of cameras that only capture mono). My biggest gripe is that it uses the outdated Mac-centric MOV container for videos. Virtually all mid-to-high end cameras now use MP4. MOV is problematic because it's not well-supported in Windows (just as Window's very popular AVI [and less popular WMV] causes problems in Macs). In fact, I know of no FREE Windows editing program that supports MOV successfully. It was major marketing blunder for Nikon to choose MOV since >85% of computer owners use Windows, and MP4 is supported by both OSs. In fact, choosing MOV was one of the reasons Kodak's handheld camcorders never sold well.

That said, this is an excellent camera for those who need advanced features but don't mind the bulk of an SLR.



Great info, thank you very much.

antwillia1


quality posts: 1 Private Messages antwillia1

My wife and I own this camera. We paid full price for it, and I think it was close to $300. It has not been a good camera for us. It takes great outdoor pictures, has a nice zoom, and takes good video. However, the picture quality of photos taken with the slightest loss of light are greatly diminished. This camera lacks the spontaneous regularity of a point and shoot camera, and the customized maneuverability of a SLR. Not to mention, the lag time on this thing is insane. You can put a bagel in the toaster and try to take a picture at the same time. By the time the bagel is done the picture might have finally taken.

While we save up for a true SLR we use this camera for family videos and our phones when we need stills. If you're thinking about getting you or your family a reliable and versatile camera, you might want to think about something else. I would give anything for the Panasonic point and shoot we had before this thing.

kjonmyway


quality posts: 2 Private Messages kjonmyway

I own this camera, as well as a dslr, and I can tell you it's a fairly good camera, and at this price, is a really good deal.

True, this is a "bridge" camera. It is not a dslr. You cannot change lenses, add filters and it doesn't shoot in "raw", although the people this camera is targeted to won't even know what raw is.

This camera is really for someone wanting a little more oomph than they can get with a point and shoot. The zoom is really, really good on this, and I took some spectacular shots of a full moon. I was actually surprised at how well they came out. The body is lighter and smaller than a dslr, and I purchased this for taking landscape shots while out backpacking, without having to lug around a 3 pound dslr and several lenses.

I disagree that it doesn't take good shots in low light. If you learn just a little bit about the different shooting modes, it can take decent low light shots...you just have to know how to adjust the settings, and take it out of "automatic" mode. I took some shots of Half Dome in Yosemite, just after sunset, and a friend who was a professional photographer couldn't believe that I didn't use a dslr. There are plenty of online classes that will teach the very basics of photography, and just a little knowledge will help get surprisingly good shots from this camera.

If you are wanting to truly learn about photography, you will want a dslr, (and I would recommend the Nikon D3200 for beginners) but if you want a little more flexibility than your point and shoot offers, and would like to play around with something other than "automatic mode" this is a great deal.

The articulating screen comes in very handy, when either taking shots at ground level, or above your head, (as in taking photos over a crowd). The zoom is what really makes this camera stand out from other bridge cameras. Someone into bird watching would really appreciate this, and I was pleasantly surprised at the shots I was able to get at almost full zoom.

If you pick one up, best thing to do is to buy a dedicated battery charger, and an extra battery (you would need the extra battery anyway). I picked one up on Amazon for $30.

ewhac


quality posts: 4 Private Messages ewhac
sdc100 wrote:My biggest gripe is that it uses the outdated Mac-centric MOV container for videos. Virtually all mid-to-high end cameras now use MP4. MOV is problematic because it's not well-supported in Windows [ ... ]


Install the ffdshow tryouts codec pack and see if things don't improve for you.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
antwillia1 wrote:I would give anything for the Panasonic point and shoot we had before this thing.



Well, you may be in luck because Woot frequently sells Panasonic Lumixes. I too have always liked Panasonic and Samsung point-and-shoots. I finally settled on Samsungs because they offer the only low cost models that can pause while recording video.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
ewhac wrote:Install the ffdshow tryouts codec pack and see if things don't improve for you.



Thanks for the help. I will try the pack next time I need to edit MOVs. WIndows plays MOV just fine. It's the editing that was problematic. YOu can probably do it with heavy duty programs like Sony Vegas, but freebies always choked. Even Apple's own Quicktime had issues in Windows.

The other problem with choosing MOV is that it's not as widely supported by non-computers. Many digital photo frames and media players, for example, don't support it. You may then need to convert the videos before playing them.

calypso699


quality posts: 0 Private Messages calypso699

I just bought a Canon SX 510 HS for $229. Should I return it and get this?

kjonmyway


quality posts: 2 Private Messages kjonmyway
calypso699 wrote:I just bought a Canon SX 510 HS for $229. Should I return it and get this?



I personally would take this camera over the Canon SX 510 HS.

Higher zoom, more mp, in-camera HDR and articulating screen, are some of the features that this camera has, that the Canon lacks.

For a comparison....
http://snapsort.com/compare/Canon-PowerShot-SX510-HS-vs-Nikon-P510


rneilf


quality posts: 1 Private Messages rneilf

Lens will not accept any screw-in filters. That means no protective skylight or UV on front to keep dirt out, prevent accidental front element coating damage, or simplify front glass cleaning. May not be a deal-killer for those who don't understand benefits, but it is for me.

Earl Wajdyk


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Earl Wajdyk

I have the previous model, with 36x zoom, + a 4x digital amplifier that actually works pretty well. My gripe is that my images are softer than my old Nikon (I think it was P501) Point and Shoot. I've been taking photos for 65 years and know most of the tricks, but I simply cannot get the sharpness that I would like. I wonder if this problem has been fixed in this model. If so, a GREAT buy.

Xntric

kjonmyway


quality posts: 2 Private Messages kjonmyway
rneilf wrote:Lens will not accept any screw-in filters. That means no protective skylight or UV on front to keep dirt out, prevent accidental front element coating damage, or simplify front glass cleaning. May not be a deal-killer for those who don't understand benefits, but it is for me.



The people who traditionally use filters probably wouldn't want this camera anyway, but as an fyi....I hacked mine to accept filters. You need to be a bit handy to do it, (and very, very careful) but you can google it, and see that many people have modified this camera to accept filters. I no longer have the link, but at one time, there was a filter attachment that fit onto the lens cap ring.

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100

Another major highlight I forgot to mention is that this has an electronic viewfinder. Many bridge cameras, and almost all point and shoots, lack one. They come in very handy when the ambient light is too bright to see the main LCD screen. It's also easier to steady the camera when it's held against the face than in the air. FInally, it uses much less energy because it's smaller, and doesn't need to outshine the ambient light. A good viewfinder will display all the data the main screen has.

And as kjonmyway mentioned above, it has an articulating screen (i.e. you can adjust its angle). That gives you a lot of flexibility in positioning the camera. For example, you can hold the camera above your head, i.e. at a parade, and still see the screen. You can also place it at foot level for nature shots and see the screen without bending.

sdc100 wrote:While this has the heft of an SLR, keep in mind that this is "only" a bridge camera, and not a full SLR. For those who don't know, these models "bridge" the gap between point-and-shoots and true SLRs, taking many of the best features of both. Those looking for the versatility and power of an SLR need to look elsewhere. For example, this only stores photos in JPG. Many serious photographers prefer RAW, which stores the image with no compression and minimal processing. That said, this has some amazing features for the price, and is probably one of the best bridge cameras out there.

Highlights include: Great optical zoom, a Backside Illuminated (BSI) sensor for better lowlight performance, and full 1080p with stereo sound (you'd be surprised by the number of cameras that only capture mono). My biggest gripe is that it uses the outdated Mac-centric MOV container for videos. Virtually all mid-to-high end cameras now use MP4. MOV is problematic because it's not well-supported in Windows (just as Window's very popular AVI [and less popular WMV] causes problems in Macs). In fact, I know of no FREE Windows editing program that supports MOV successfully. It was major marketing blunder for Nikon to choose MOV since >85% of computer owners use Windows, and MP4 is supported by both OSs. In fact, choosing MOV was one of the reasons Kodak's handheld camcorders never sold well.

That said, this is an excellent camera for those who need advanced features but don't mind the bulk of an SLR.



Loudermilkphoto


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Loudermilkphoto

Ordered one today. Have used this camera before on loan from a friend. As a bridge camera it is one of the best I have used. Light weight, great zoom, though less noise if you do not zoom 100% (but that is almost always true)

sdc100


quality posts: 505 Private Messages sdc100
Mursenary wrote:Great info, thank you very much.



You're welcome. Please take my info with a grain of salt. Unlike many other posters here, I have never taken a photography course nor even owned an SLR. And the only bridge camera I owned was returned within a week (too bulky to carry around!). But I do buy lots of cameras as gifts....

Mursenary


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Mursenary
sdc100 wrote:You're welcome. Please take my info with a grain of salt. Unlike many other posters here, I have never taken a photography course nor even owned an SLR. And the only bridge camera I owned was returned within a week (too bulky to carry around!). But I do buy lots of cameras as gifts....



The mostly positive reviews and a quick Google price check makes me think I'm all in. I'm an amateur, but would like better pics than my current touch and shoot provides.

dickrourke


quality posts: 4 Private Messages dickrourke

Nobody ever seems to mention the other benefit of a viewfinder; I need reading glasses and a viewfinder means one less delay/bother piece of equipment. It's wonderful.

Plus, sunshine Does wash out other solutions found at this price-point, a big disadvantage; denial of viewfinders always has been an economic and fashion decision.

SunriseSurfer


quality posts: 1 Private Messages SunriseSurfer
Earl Wajdyk wrote:I have the previous model, with 36x zoom, + a 4x digital amplifier that actually works pretty well. My gripe is that my images are softer than my old Nikon (I think it was P501) Point and Shoot. I've been taking photos for 65 years and know most of the tricks, but I simply cannot get the sharpness that I would like. I wonder if this problem has been fixed in this model. If so, a GREAT buy.




"...the sharpness" - - EXACTLY.

I'm sure it's a great point and shoot. In fact, I previously owned a Nikon P90, for years. I now have a Fuji S8200. Great camera, great zoom (as I take lots of long distance surf shots), ... but it still lacks "the sharpness" that I would prefer. I guess the only way to get more sharpness is to go to a true DSLR.

I have been looking/considering the Canon SX50 though for even more zoom, though I don't think I really need more zoom. What I need is ... more sharpness.

DSLR probably but I don't want to carry around those expensive cameras and lenses. Point and Shoot is sooooo easy.

Other than sharpness, this camera does seem like a really good deal.

radi0j0hn


quality posts: 96 Private Messages radi0j0hn
antwillia1 wrote:My wife and I own this camera. We paid full price for it, and I think it was close to $300. It has not been a good camera for us. It takes great outdoor pictures, has a nice zoom, and takes good video. However, the picture quality of photos taken with the slightest loss of light are greatly diminished. This camera lacks the spontaneous regularity of a point and shoot camera, and the customized maneuverability of a SLR. Not to mention, the lag time on this thing is insane. You can put a bagel in the toaster and try to take a picture at the same time. By the time the bagel is done the picture might have finally taken.

While we save up for a true SLR we use this camera for family videos and our phones when we need stills. If you're thinking about getting you or your family a reliable and versatile camera, you might want to think about something else. I would give anything for the Panasonic point and shoot we had before this thing.



Things will improve, but we are still in the early days of this technology.

90% of the complaints I hear from students and others are about poor low-light performance.

If you need to shoot action in low light, right now a quality DSLR with a MUCH better lens than the "kit lens" is essential.

Also, take the darn thing off full auto and learn to set the ISO higher and use aperture priority to open the lens up as far as it will go.

Learn the limitations of the camera BEFORE you buy it.

Digital is not magic, it just means you are not using film.

acpress.com Not cute, but useful.

lorenzodemedici


quality posts: 36 Private Messages lorenzodemedici

This is a two year old model but there haven't been any remarkable advances since 2012 that are missing from this camera. It has a BSI CMOS sensor which is state of the art. But it's a small sensor camera with a big zoom on it. Full of compromises. You don't get something for nothing. Let's see, can I think of any other overused clichés.
DP Review liked it back in 2012. $200 is a great price for this camera. Nikon factory refurbished should be like new condition. But this camera is all about the zoom. If you like to photograph things that are really far away, and don't want to tote 6 lbs of expensive DSLR gear, this camera has your name on it. But the light better be good and you'll need a steady hand, or a tripod. Don't expect to get photos at the long end of the zoom in low light, unless you're really good or really lucky. But at this price, I like this camera a lot.

radi0j0hn


quality posts: 96 Private Messages radi0j0hn

Someone said "a 4x digital amplifier that actually works pretty well" and then complained about lack of sharpness.

Please know that the "amplifier" is simply in-camera cropping.

4X means that your 16 MP camera is cropping down to 4 MP. No doubt you do a bit more in editing.

So you probably end up with a shot that looks like it was taken with 3 MP camera. Might explain a lot, eh?

I had one student that cropped out 97% of a 10 MP and did not understand why it looked so "blurry."

Learning what your camera is actually doing is critical to getting better results.

acpress.com Not cute, but useful.

whowootbuythat


quality posts: 0 Private Messages whowootbuythat

Does it take pictures in a dark area with a lighted stage such as an indoor concert?

j647


quality posts: 1 Private Messages j647

A lot of the sharpness issues may come from two sources: Holding the camera steady at the equivalent of an 1000mm lens in the full-frame world is darn near impossible. The smallest bit of camera shake will make pictures soft. A tripod would help if one were using the lens at any thing over a 250mm equivalent. Also, optical zooms are soft so anything using that will not be what you'd expect. Zoom range (36x, 42x etc. is the new megapixel battle. Big numbers are better, right?). The intreating thing about this is that it begins at a 28mm equivalent, pretty good and easily wide enough for group photos.

Shutter lag is also a problem on these cameras. You need to take the picture in anticipation of the decisive moment, not at the decisive moment.

That being said, if you stay within a reasonable zoom range, make sure you stay within a reasonable zoom range and plan your shots, you will get some fine pictures.

PS buy at least one extra batter and two large memory cards.

oldhickorytony


quality posts: 0 Private Messages oldhickorytony
kjonmyway wrote:I own this camera, as well as a dslr, and I can tell you it's a fairly good camera, and at this price, is a really good deal.



I have one of these cameras and I ditto everything you had to say about it.

"We have a date with destiny - and it looks like she's ordered the lobster!" from the Mystery Men

j647


quality posts: 1 Private Messages j647
dliidlii1 wrote:I might have bought this if I hadn't just purchased the Nikon P500(only a 36X zoom)for $79 used from Amazon.



good find, I paid $399 when they first came out a few years ago.....

liltoofs


quality posts: 0 Private Messages liltoofs

I'm seriously thinking of buying this camera but I wonder if someone here could recommend an SD card for it.

fdjames


quality posts: 0 Private Messages fdjames

Does this camera have any form of image stabilization? Being nearly a Geezer I find that stabilization is important.

Thanks,

classicwhaler


quality posts: 0 Private Messages classicwhaler

Buyer beware! The extreme zoom range of this and every other super zoom point and shoot camera means compromises in lens sharpness. 5X optical zoom or less will get you the sharpest pictures.

calypso699


quality posts: 0 Private Messages calypso699
kjonmyway wrote:I personally would take this camera over the Canon SX 510 HS.

Higher zoom, more mp, in-camera HDR and articulating screen, are some of the features that this camera has, that the Canon lacks.

For a comparison....
http://snapsort.com/compare/Canon-PowerShot-SX510-HS-vs-Nikon-P510



Thank you! Looks like I'll be returning the Canon.

jeffiekins


quality posts: 56 Private Messages jeffiekins
liltoofs wrote:I'm seriously thinking of buying this camera but I wonder if someone here could recommend an SD card for it.


Any Class 10 (or "extreme" faster) card at least 16 Gb will be your friend with this camera. With high-megapixel pics and HD video, you need a fast memory card to get the (huge) file stored fast enough, and a big card to hold a vacation worth of shots. Too few people think about this.

If you won't use it for videos longer than a few minutes, and will always be able to transfer the card contents to a computer every night, 8 Gb is big enough (around $10). But the $5-10 savings doesn't seem "worth it" to me.

You should be able to find 16 Gb for between $15-20, including U.S. shipping, in a couple of days of looking. If you don't want to bother finding one on sale, Amazon Basics and Microcenter.com are good ways to get generic tech items like that without getting ripped off. (Going to your local Office Depot or Radio Shack -- if there's not a sale -- would be a good way to get ripped off.)

I was once in a camera store with no other customers, chatting with the sales guy. I asked him what's the new hot camera, and he showed me something with, I think, 30 MP. So I asked him how do you get 30 MP onto the SD card fast enough to get a decent repeat-shot rate for action. He just smiled and said "we try not to talk about that."

I'm supposed to buy something? But we're having so much fun with things as they are, I don't want to ruin it!
Purchases: 18 / 11 (nobody cares what, so I won't tell you);
Brownies of Cannabis: 1 / 12 (Thanks, Wootalyzer! -- would it help if I called them something else?).

winddrifter


quality posts: 0 Private Messages winddrifter
antwillia1 wrote:My wife and I own this camera. We paid full price for it, and I think it was close to $300. It has not been a good camera for us. It takes great outdoor pictures, has a nice zoom, and takes good video. However, the picture quality of photos taken with the slightest loss of light are greatly diminished.



One of the biggest limitations of being a "bridge" camera is that you do not get the larger sensor size of a true SLR. Larger sensor size means larger physical pixel size, which is essentially a "light bucket" for catching photons. Lots of other consequences of small sensor size: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/digital-camera-sensor-size.htm




liveline


quality posts: 0 Private Messages liveline

Does this camera have the ability to shoot black and white photos?

terryj42


quality posts: 1 Private Messages terryj42
liveline wrote:Does this camera have the ability to shoot black and white photos?



Yes. See page 55 of the manual:
http://www.nikonusa.com/pdf/manuals/coolpix/P510_EN.pdf

Of course, you can always edit the photo later with computer software and either drop out the saturation or convert the image to "greyscale". Most all software will do these processes, but I like the free ones like GiMP and paint.net. I also will sometimes just drop the green and blue channels for an image which gives my a B&W pic that looks like it was shot through a red filter (really brings out the contrast in the sky).

bowlingb


quality posts: 19 Private Messages bowlingb
radi0j0hn wrote:Things will improve, but we are still in the early days of this technology.

90% of the complaints I hear from students and others are about poor low-light performance.

If you need to shoot action in low light, right now a quality DSLR with a MUCH better lens than the "kit lens" is essential.



All very true but now you're talking about a very significant investment. The lens you describe will cost as much, if not more, than the camera body. That's a lot of coin to take pictures at the dance recital.