jennylundergan


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jennylundergan

I see a lot of info on outdoor scene shots, but does anyone have experience with this camera and fast moving sports shots?

hurrifred2002


quality posts: 1 Private Messages hurrifred2002

This is just general info...free..so its worth what you paid for it. Most photos I shoot are printed 4x6 or on occation 5x7 inches. I find 8mp is fine for those and the camera performs faster at that setting. I up the mp setting when needed but, for the most part I shoot at the smaller setting.

wesdapilot


quality posts: 1 Private Messages wesdapilot

OK, a few points about this camera. The line started about 6-8 years ago with the P90, a 24x zoom and 12 mp resolution. It grew to the P100 (longer zoom, 10 mp), then the P500, then the P510 and now the P520.

Those who complain about low light simply aren't changing the ISO, which has to be done in the menu on this model. I use it all the time in very low light as I often shoot stage shows and musical performers for publication. I have taken the camera on safari as a back-up and long distance camera and have some incredible shots of African wildlife at great distances, all of which are tack sharp. Those who get the camera and put it in automatic or program mode may be unhappy with the output because of motion and gausian blur, but put it in aperture priority and set it properly and you won't have a problem.

Having said that, I sold my P90 when I bought the P100, sold that when I bought the P500, sold that when I bought the P510 and just sold that when I bought the new P520.

It has several great advantages. First, there is NO shutter lag. Focus the shot, push the shutter and it instantly shoots the photo.

Second, you can select "Fine" from the menu and while not Raw, is 16 mp of information and that can be put into Photoshop and then saved as a .tif file and worked from there.

Finally, cheap batteries are readily available and search on e-bay and you can find a $4 recharger. If you charge in the camera, it is slow and takes away your ability to use the camera for the period of the charge.

For what it's worth, I bought the P520 recently for $237, New. I like the camera well enough that I recommend it when teaching camera selection courses at the local college and have given it as gifts to my 4 granddaughters and to my son, who is a musician and he loves it for shooting in low light.

virtual1one


quality posts: 6 Private Messages virtual1one
kjonmyway wrote:I hacked mine to accept filters. You need to be a bit handy to do it, (and very, very careful)


A LONG time ago I had an original powershot with 27mm (iirc) threads. it had the same issue, no ring. In this case I found someone on ebay selling a right angle adapter that screwed down into the tripod adapter and held out rings right in front of the lens. I'd imagine you can find something like that for this too, but it will have to be made for this SPECIFIC model due to the variable placement of the tripod mount and lens. Mine also had its own tripod hole in the bottom so I didn't lose that feature either. Just couldn't change the battery without detaching it.

My current S3IS has a "barrel adapter" that is made for this camera. It has a ring around the lens that is removable, that leaves behind a locking connection. $18 on ebay got me an aluminum barrel that locks onto that and ends in 35mm threads right where they need to be, way out in front to give the long zooming lens assembly room to extend. I've got fish-eye, zoom, and several filters for it.

Got that S3IS for $230 (a steal at the time), this is sorely tempting, I'm due for an upgrade. The long zoom I see as a huge feature for me (birdwatching) but someone said it takes ages between shots, and you just can't expect wildlife to hang around and pose while your camera spools up.

I can live with a proprietary cable (as my S3IS has) but the battery may be a bigger problem. My S1 and S2 used a pack that contained 5 AAAA batteries. $42 per lasted about 40 shots each. Finally ripped one open and replaced with better cells (for about $15), doubled the runtime. Dirty tricks like that turn me off.

gak0090


quality posts: 76 Private Messages gak0090
radi0j0hn wrote:Someone said "a 4x digital amplifier that actually works pretty well" and then complained about lack of sharpness.

Please know that the "amplifier" is simply in-camera cropping.

4X means that your 16 MP camera is cropping down to 4 MP. No doubt you do a bit more in editing.

So you probably end up with a shot that looks like it was taken with 3 MP camera. Might explain a lot, eh?

I had one student that cropped out 97% of a 10 MP and did not understand why it looked so "blurry."

Learning what your camera is actually doing is critical to getting better results.



Radiojohn, I have the Sony DSC-HX100V. Will this give me any significant advantages over what I am currently using. I like the camera I have, but I could give it to my brother. This is specifically what I want to know: 1) Would this be able to do video as well as the Sony? I use my Sony for all my video and it does a nice job- it also keeps me from having to carry around 2 different devices. I'm not worried about the .mov, a codec pack will solve that.
2)Would this have better low-light ability than the Sony? I'm pretty satisfied with how the Sony does in low light- but if this does better/worst, I'd like to know
3)Would this be better/worst in full automatic mode. I just know the bare basics of photography and want the computer to compensate for all my inadequacies. Do you think that there are any advantages or disadvantages.

Thanks in advance.

Peaty


quality posts: 16 Private Messages Peaty
wesdapilot wrote:OK, a few points about this camera. The line started about 6-8 years ago with the P90, a 24x zoom and 12 mp



Actually the Nikon P80 with 18X was even before that. I have one and still use it frequently as a vacation camera or a one I take where they don't allow DSLR's like many sporting events. I have two Nikon DSLR bodies (D3x and D300) but you don't always want to carry around heavy, expensive equipment. These are handy, smallish and easy to use. If you don't really know what your doing with photography you can still get decent photos. If you do know what you are doing you'd be surprised how good they really are.

Lucky for me it uses the same batteries as the P80. I have two batteries and a charger. If you search for the battery EN-EL5 You'll find they aren't expensive. You can get a knock off brand charger and two batteries for 20-25 bucks. I like to stick with Nikon brand though and they are closer to 30 each. I've found the batteries last quite a long time especially if you don't like using the back screen. I'm use to using a viewfinder all the time so that's no an issue for me. Of course using the flash will shorten the battery life too. The batteries are quick to swap out.

I'm in for one to replace my P80, I'll just pass it on to my kid. FWIW here are some pics from my Nikon P80 which is a similar camera but came out in 2003 with only 10MP. These are from earlier this month: https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/109512727678539949818/albums/5954926740093834353

The camera still works fine.

~peaty



Peaty

150+ Woots and no signs of stopping...

strollin


quality posts: 0 Private Messages strollin
sdc100 wrote:Another major highlight I forgot to mention is that this has an electronic viewfinder. Many bridge cameras, and almost all point and shoots, lack one. They come in very handy when the ambient light is too bright to see the main LCD screen. It's also easier to steady the camera when it's held against the face than in the air. FInally, it uses much less energy because it's smaller, and doesn't need to outshine the ambient light. A good viewfinder will display all the data the main screen has. ...


I have a Nikon L810 which is a similar camera and I don't like it due to the electronic viewfinder. It's impossible to see it in bright light and very difficult to steady the camera since you have to hold the camera out in front of you in order to see the screen. I'll never buy another camera that ONLY has an electronic viewfinder. Very poor design.

gak0090


quality posts: 76 Private Messages gak0090
strollin wrote:I have a Nikon L810 which is a similar camera and I don't like it due to the electronic viewfinder. It's impossible to see it in bright light and very difficult to steady the camera since you have to hold the camera out in front of you in order to see the screen. I'll never buy another camera that ONLY has an electronic viewfinder. Very poor design.



I think you are confused. Your L810 only has an LCD screen to view the picture. This Camera P510 also has an electronic viewfinder which is the part located above the LCD screen used to look through in high light situations (like old style cameras had)- except the old viewfinders were optical and not electronic.

tazzyjasper


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tazzyjasper

I have a P90 I was given several years ago and got into doing bracketed photos for HDR. The P500 is the only model in this line that will allow you to fire your bracketed shots with the timer. This is needed in lower light when you don't want to jostle the camera. In all of the other "P" models the timer is a totally separate function and won't work with bracketing. None of them have a remote function which would also keep camera from jiggling.

These are fun cameras, easy to haul around and fire away. I like having both the viewfinder and the rotating live view screen. Especially like the swivel screen on the tripod in lower light. Lots of compromises compared to proper DSLRs but have upgraded to a smallish Samsung system and am still getting used to hauling around lenses, swapping them out without messing up the sensor, and the general hassle factor. Sure, photos are better but shoot a lot less impromptu with it.

Still thinking about getting a used P500 for fun ...

wfhom


quality posts: 0 Private Messages wfhom

Were these so bad that Nikon had a boatload of cameras to recondition in order to sell them here at any decent quantity?

wfhom


quality posts: 0 Private Messages wfhom

electronic viewfinder with 40x optical zoom? no. wouldn't want that. electric viewfinder is horrible, especially in low light. even in good light, you don't really get a good imagine of the true picture you are trying to take. I have a camera with an electronic viewfinder. horrible!

gak0090


quality posts: 76 Private Messages gak0090
wfhom wrote:electronic viewfinder with 40x optical zoom? no. wouldn't want that. electric viewfinder is horrible, especially in low light. even in good light, you don't really get a good imagine of the true picture you are trying to take. I have a camera with an electronic viewfinder. horrible!



My Sony HX100v has an electronic viewfinder, that I use quite often when it's really bright out and I can't see the LCD that well. It's a 30X zoom, and the viewfinder works really well even at zoomed images. I prefer using the LCD display on it since it's a higher resolution, but in bright light the viewfinder is much better. I would not use it in low light though, I don't see how that would give me an advantage over the LCD panel.

radi0j0hn


quality posts: 93 Private Messages radi0j0hn
jennylundergan wrote:I see a lot of info on outdoor scene shots, but does anyone have experience with this camera and fast moving sports shots?



Not gonna happen indoors in the HS gym. Trust me.

acpress.com Not cute, but useful.

MelFLNative


quality posts: 0 Private Messages MelFLNative

Try the D-80 if you can get one used it is BY FAR the BEST camera I've owned, in fact, I don't think it has ever taken a bad picture and that is completely regardless of light, day, night etc. LOVE IT. It is all automatic.

antwillia1 wrote:My wife and I own this camera. We paid full price for it, and I think it was close to $300. It has not been a good camera for us. It takes great outdoor pictures, has a nice zoom, and takes good video. However, the picture quality of photos taken with the slightest loss of light are greatly diminished. This camera lacks the spontaneous regularity of a point and shoot camera, and the customized maneuverability of a SLR. Not to mention, the lag time on this thing is insane. You can put a bagel in the toaster and try to take a picture at the same time. By the time the bagel is done the picture might have finally taken.

While we save up for a true SLR we use this camera for family videos and our phones when we need stills. If you're thinking about getting you or your family a reliable and versatile camera, you might want to think about something else. I would give anything for the Panasonic point and shoot we had before this thing.



radi0j0hn


quality posts: 93 Private Messages radi0j0hn
gak0090 wrote:Radiojohn, I have the Sony DSC-HX100V. Will this give me any significant advantages over what I am currently using. I like the camera I have, but I could give it to my brother. This is specifically what I want to know: 1) Would this be able to do video as well as the Sony? I use my Sony for all my video and it does a nice job- it also keeps me from having to carry around 2 different devices. I'm not worried about the .mov, a codec pack will solve that.
2)Would this have better low-light ability than the Sony? I'm pretty satisfied with how the Sony does in low light- but if this does better/worst, I'd like to know
3)Would this be better/worst in full automatic mode. I just know the bare basics of photography and want the computer to compensate for all my inadequacies. Do you think that there are any advantages or disadvantages.

Thanks in advance.



Sorry, I wish I could help. I have a 16 MP compact Sony that is good with video, but I'm really not a video guy, so I'm sure you will get a better answer from somebody else.

I would assume that if the low light photos are not good, then the low-light videos would not be good either?

acpress.com Not cute, but useful.

LordBling


quality posts: 4 Private Messages LordBling

I'm in for one! Not really in the market for a DSLR (financially or for the bulk), but my point-and-shoot cameras are still leaving me wanting. Maybe this will be the 'bridge' that carries me towards an eventual DSLR, but I'm fine with taking baby steps.

radi0j0hn


quality posts: 93 Private Messages radi0j0hn
bowlingb wrote:All very true but now you're talking about a very significant investment. The lens you describe will cost as much, if not more, than the camera body. That's a lot of coin to take pictures at the dance recital.



Yep, there ain't no free lunch at this stage of development.

In a few years we will have ISO's far higher than now, but we have to spend to get good results until that happens.

My first 5 MP camera cost $1,200!



acpress.com Not cute, but useful.

phildozer


quality posts: 1 Private Messages phildozer
wfhom wrote:Were these so bad that Nikon had a boatload of cameras to recondition in order to sell them here at any decent quantity?



No.


phildozer


quality posts: 1 Private Messages phildozer

I own this camera and have for the last year. I purchased it as a solid camera with a great zoom that is easily carried with me at all times and have been absolutely delighted with it. I take a lot of pictures of street art and frequently have to venture into some "access-challenged" locations. This has meant an occasional knock or bump beyond what I imagine the engineers at Nikon would appreciate. Never had a problem.

All the photos on here from December, 2012 are using this camera as are the videos.

https://plus.google.com/+PhilPietrowski/posts

loisrn1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages loisrn1

Can this camera accept one of the gadgets that makes it wifi or blue tooth enabled?

sandydaugherty


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sandydaugherty

There are two types of commenters here; those who have this camera and those who are trying to sound like they know what they are talking about. I own one. It is good. Buy it. The view finder is a must have. Using a 3" screen is hopeless in too many situations. Wild Optical zoom range? Sooo sweet. But any shake at looong zooms goes fuzzy. Simple physics. Try signing your name with a 10 foot pencil.
Lens quality not up to Interchangeable lens DSLR? You still get what you pay for most of the time, but in the case of the P510, you get more; lots more.

Peaty


quality posts: 16 Private Messages Peaty
loisrn1 wrote:Can this camera accept one of the gadgets that makes it wifi or blue tooth enabled?



No according to the manual, or at least it says you can't use one of those wi-fi SD chips.

Peaty

150+ Woots and no signs of stopping...

GTTraveller


quality posts: 6 Private Messages GTTraveller

Anyone else having issues with checking out?

radi0j0hn


quality posts: 93 Private Messages radi0j0hn
sandydaugherty wrote:There are two types of commenters here; those who have this camera and those who are trying to sound like they know what they are talking about. I own one. It is good. Buy it. The view finder is a must have. Using a 3" screen is hopeless in too many situations. Wild Optical zoom range? Sooo sweet. But any shake at looong zooms goes fuzzy. Simple physics. Try signing your name with a 10 foot pencil.
Lens quality not up to Interchangeable lens DSLR? You still get what you pay for most of the time, but in the case of the P510, you get more; lots more.



Blanket "buy it" endorsements are no good, unless everyone uses the camera exactly as you do. They do not.

How is it for focusing and shooting a high school basketball game? I can tell you now, not great. You don't have to own the camera to read the specs and do the lighting/ISO/F-stop math.

Been dealing with people buying the wrong camera for ten years. Get the right tool for the job or sit back and enjoy the game.

acpress.com Not cute, but useful.

sfv


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sfv
Peaty wrote:Actually the Nikon P80 with 18X was even before that. I have one and still use it frequently as a vacation camera or a one I take where they don't allow DSLR's like many sporting events. I have two Nikon DSLR bodies (D3x and D300) but you don't always want to carry around heavy, expensive equipment. These are handy, smallish and easy to use. If you don't really know what your doing with photography you can still get decent photos. If you do know what you are doing you'd be surprised how good they really are.

Lucky for me it uses the same batteries as the P80. I have two batteries and a charger. If you search for the battery EN-EL5 You'll find they aren't expensive. You can get a knock off brand charger and two batteries for 20-25 bucks. I like to stick with Nikon brand though and they are closer to 30 each. I've found the batteries last quite a long time especially if you don't like using the back screen. I'm use to using a viewfinder all the time so that's no an issue for me. Of course using the flash will shorten the battery life too. The batteries are quick to swap out.

I'm in for one to replace my P80, I'll just pass it on to my kid. FWIW here are some pics from my Nikon P80 which is a similar camera but came out in 2003 with only 10MP. These are from earlier this month: https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/109512727678539949818/albums/5954926740093834353

The camera still works fine.

~peaty



In for one. Your pics sold me. My Sony HV-X100 has served me well, almost 100,000 exposures but it sometimes stops during a video shot. This seems a nice tradeup at half the price.

manhandsha


quality posts: 31 Private Messages manhandsha

Staff

GTTraveller wrote:Anyone else having issues with checking out?



Are you still having trouble? If so, are you using a mobile device or a computer? Which browser? Have you cleared cache?

Have a question about your order or account? Click here to contact Woot Member Services.

liltoofs


quality posts: 0 Private Messages liltoofs
jeffiekins wrote:Any Class 10 (or "extreme" faster) card at least 16 Gb will be your friend with this camera. With high-megapixel pics and HD video, you need a fast memory card to get the (huge) file stored fast enough, and a big card to hold a vacation worth of shots. Too few people think about this.

If you won't use it for videos longer than a few minutes, and will always be able to transfer the card contents to a computer every night, 8 Gb is big enough (around $10). But the $5-10 savings doesn't seem "worth it" to me.

You should be able to find 16 Gb for between $15-20, including U.S. shipping, in a couple of days of looking. If you don't want to bother finding one on sale, Amazon Basics and Microcenter.com are good ways to get generic tech items like that without getting ripped off. (Going to your local Office Depot or Radio Shack -- if there's not a sale -- would be a good way to get ripped off.)

I was once in a camera store with no other customers, chatting with the sales guy. I asked him what's the new hot camera, and he showed me something with, I think, 30 MP. So I asked him how do you get 30 MP onto the SD card fast enough to get a decent repeat-shot rate for action. He just smiled and said "we try not to talk about that."



Thank you!

melikeycheapy


quality posts: 0 Private Messages melikeycheapy

I want to be the uncle in the sleigh... so I bought the Nikon!!!

Peaty


quality posts: 16 Private Messages Peaty
jeffiekins wrote:Any Class 10 (or "extreme" faster) card at least 16 Gb will be your friend with this camera. With high-megapixel pics and HD video, you need a fast memory card to get the (huge) file stored fast enough, and a big card to hold a vacation worth of shots. Too few people think about this.

If you won't use it for videos longer than a few minutes, and will always be able to transfer the card contents to a computer every night, 8 Gb is big enough (around $10). But the $5-10 savings doesn't seem "worth it" to me.

You should be able to find 16 Gb for between $15-20, including U.S. shipping, in a couple of days of looking. If you don't want to bother finding one on sale, Amazon Basics and Microcenter.com are good ways to get generic tech items like that without getting ripped off. (Going to your local Office Depot or Radio Shack -- if there's not a sale -- would be a good way to get ripped off.)

I was once in a camera store with no other customers, chatting with the sales guy. I asked him what's the new hot camera, and he showed me something with, I think, 30 MP. So I asked him how do you get 30 MP onto the SD card fast enough to get a decent repeat-shot rate for action. He just smiled and said "we try not to talk about that."



Looking at the user manual they suggest class 6 or higher. I agree that a Class 10 is a good idea. What also limits the camera's ability to shoot rapidly is the internal buffer. It looks like this camera has about 90 MB which will only hold maybe a burst of maybe 5 in a row before having to move the files to the card. So the faster the card the better but only to a point.

High end cameras will hold a lot in the buffer, on the order of 130 jpgs or about 40 RAW, before having to transfer to the card, so having a super fast card isn't a great advantage unless you are shooting video.

From the manual>

Internal Memory and Memory Cards
Camera data, including images and movies, can be saved in either the camera’s
internal memory (approximately 90 MB) or on a memory card. To use the camera’s
internal memory for shooting or playback, first remove the memory card.
• When recording a movie onto a memory card, a memory card with an SD speed
class of Class 6 or higher is recommended. If the transfer speed of the card is
slow, the movie recording may end unexpectedly.

Peaty

150+ Woots and no signs of stopping...

cueballsi


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cueballsi

Where did you get the p520 for $237??!!??


wesdapilot wrote:OK, a few points about this camera. The line started about 6-8 years ago with the P90, a 24x zoom and 12 mp resolution. It grew to the P100 (longer zoom, 10 mp), then the P500, then the P510 and now the P520.

Those who complain about low light simply aren't changing the ISO, which has to be done in the menu on this model. I use it all the time in very low light as I often shoot stage shows and musical performers for publication. I have taken the camera on safari as a back-up and long distance camera and have some incredible shots of African wildlife at great distances, all of which are tack sharp. Those who get the camera and put it in automatic or program mode may be unhappy with the output because of motion and gausian blur, but put it in aperture priority and set it properly and you won't have a problem.

Having said that, I sold my P90 when I bought the P100, sold that when I bought the P500, sold that when I bought the P510 and just sold that when I bought the new P520.

It has several great advantages. First, there is NO shutter lag. Focus the shot, push the shutter and it instantly shoots the photo.

Second, you can select "Fine" from the menu and while not Raw, is 16 mp of information and that can be put into Photoshop and then saved as a .tif file and worked from there.

Finally, cheap batteries are readily available and search on e-bay and you can find a $4 recharger. If you charge in the camera, it is slow and takes away your ability to use the camera for the period of the charge.

For what it's worth, I bought the P520 recently for $237, New. I like the camera well enough that I recommend it when teaching camera selection courses at the local college and have given it as gifts to my 4 granddaughters and to my son, who is a musician and he loves it for shooting in low light.



srees


quality posts: 9 Private Messages srees

I got a dud, nearly DOA. I could use what charge was on the battery, but once it ran out, that was it. No chargey. Hope the rest of you who bought one had a better experience!

How can something be better than nothing if nothing is perfect?

I can haz badgez finally after 12 Bungled Original Communicator

ROGETRAY


quality posts: 152 Private Messages ROGETRAY

Staff

srees wrote:I got a dud, nearly DOA. I could use what charge was on the battery, but once it ran out, that was it. No chargey. Hope the rest of you who bought one had a better experience!



Sorry to hear that you received a DOA unit.

We recommend that you contact Nikon Customer Support and let them know what you're experiencing. Your purchase still carries a 90 Day Nikon Warranty.
They should easily be able to help remedy the issue.

If they're unable to help, please feel free to email into Woot Member Service at support@woot.com

srees


quality posts: 9 Private Messages srees
ROGETRAY wrote:Sorry to hear that you received a DOA unit.

We recommend that you contact Nikon Customer Support and let them know what you're experiencing. Your purchase still carries a 90 Day Nikon Warranty.
They should easily be able to help remedy the issue.

If they're unable to help, please feel free to email into Woot Member Service at support@woot.com



Does Woot! pay return shipping on a defective product? I contacted Nikon, they want me to pay $12+ return shipping to get the camera back to them for evaluation.

I tried service@woot.com, and got a message saying it would be a week before I get a response...

How can something be better than nothing if nothing is perfect?

I can haz badgez finally after 12 Bungled Original Communicator

Peaty


quality posts: 16 Private Messages Peaty
srees wrote:Does Woot! pay return shipping on a defective product? I contacted Nikon, they want me to pay $12+ return shipping to get the camera back to them for evaluation.

I tried service@woot.com, and got a message saying it would be a week before I get a response...




I sent a watch back not too long ago, they sent me an e-mail with a pre printed shipping label they paid for.

Peaty

150+ Woots and no signs of stopping...

dln2477


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dln2477

I got mine a week ago and the charging port is damaged and will not let you install the cable. I sent Woot a email and they gave me a case number and said use your big boy voice what kind of B.S. is that? You cannot talk to any one in customer service ( what customer service?)So I sent them another email to ask when I could send it back and they sent me another case number and said they were busy. I think I am done with this crap. So I emailed PayPal about my payment.