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Econo-Heat Wall Heater

Speed to First Woot:
2m 29.226s
First Sucker:
josephratz
Last Wooter to Woot:
markgmerek
Last Purchase:
10 months ago
Order Pace (rank):
Top 31% of Woot.com Woots
Top 13% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Top 5% of Woot.com Woots
Top 2% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

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  • 8% second woot
  • 30% < 10 woots
  • 22% < 25 woots
  • 27% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 7% joined today
  • 0% one week old
  • 1% one month old
  • 17% one year old
  • 75% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 68% bought 1
  • 23% bought 2
  • 9% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

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Quality Posts


lichme


quality posts: 3052 Private Messages lichme

[Preview 1][Preview 2][Preview 3][Preview 4][Preview 5]


Econo-Heat Wall Heater
Price: $59.99
Shipping Options: $5 Standard
Shipping Estimates: Ships in 1-2 business days (Tuesday, Jan 14 to Wednesday, Jan 15) + transit
Condition: New

Buy It Search Amazon Search Google

Previous Similar Sales (May not be exact model)
12/2/2013 - $56.99 (Woot-off) - 2 comment(s)
11/19/2013 - $59.99 - 28 comment(s)
10/17/2013 - $59.99 - 77 comment(s)


11/14/2013 - $59.99 (Woot Plus)
12/17/2012 - $60.00 (Woot Plus)

lichme


quality posts: 3052 Private Messages lichme

Good reviews from Home Depot

Check out the product page

Pretty Good reviews over at wayfair

Mikeraypole


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Mikeraypole

I bought this the last time it was on woot for a room in my 100 year old house that doesn't seem to be able to stay warm enough. It has worked amazingly and I could not be happier with my purchase. Installing it was super easy and really only took about 10 minutes before it was on the wall and ready to use.

wootaddict


quality posts: 2 Private Messages wootaddict

...this unit costs $76.98 on Amazon. A whole $12.95 (after tax) in savings--big whoop!

jshagam


quality posts: 3 Private Messages jshagam

Two questions:

1) Does it have a built-in shutoff timer?
2) Does it have a thermostat?

From all of the information I can find about it online, it looks like the answer to both questions is "no." So how does one control the temperature and, ideally, make it automatically shut off after a certain amount of time?

mslim7


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mslim7

Bought this about a year ago. Unboxed it and there was a crack through the control panel. Had to ship in back. Disappointed.

Might buy another one.

I hate that it only has one setting and no temperature adjustment. But most reviews say it gets around 70 degrees.

conanthelibrarian


quality posts: 3690 Private Messages conanthelibrarian



and relax to some music and enjoy this video

greyday


quality posts: 52 Private Messages greyday

I have a couple of these, and they are a great compliment to a heating setup. I have oil heat, which is fast and efficient but expensive, so I heat the house normally, then turn down the heater and turn on these in the rooms I use most, and it maintains the temperature very, very well. The one in my bedroom I've even had to shut off due to waking up sweating, thinking of buying a thermostat plug for that one. Plus at 400w, forgetting to shut one off isn't as big a deal as with a 1500w radiating heater...

worldofjohnboy


quality posts: 77 Private Messages worldofjohnboy

First, here's the Amazon product page. Save a few bucks buy purchasing here.

If you are going to get this to save $ on heat, I would suggest buying a wall thermostat as this doesn't have one.

I actually purchased this but ended up cancelling the order as we wanted to mount it on the wall in my daughter's bedroom as hers is over the garage. This wall heater is not "cool to the touch." It may be OK if you touch it for a second, but we saw reviews and got concerned that it could hurt my daughter. We instead decided to go with the Eheat Envi HH1012T wall heater... it's cool to the touch, has a built in thermostat, rated 475 watts, and after applying a discount, only paid $119.

If you were to buy this heater plus a wall thermostat, it's only marginally less expensive.

"Every man dies... not every man truly lives." -William Wallace (from the movie Braveheart)

s1utster


quality posts: 1 Private Messages s1utster

Thinking about getting this for the garage.

pcwolf


quality posts: 0 Private Messages pcwolf

17% discount usually gets my attention

wootaddict wrote:...this unit costs $76.98 on Amazon. A whole $12.95 (after tax) in savings--big whoop!



lstaff


quality posts: 202 Private Messages lstaff

Does anyone think this would be useful as a source of heat in a chicken coop?

peaceetc


quality posts: 7 Private Messages peaceetc

For those who have this unit -- how hot does it get to the touch? I have pets, and I wouldn't want them coming into contact with it and getting injured. Thanks.



I've won a lot of bags of crud. Envy me.

catgrrl


quality posts: 9 Private Messages catgrrl

Econo-Heater Brain Dump

I have these in two of my bedrooms. Background: 50-year-old house, not that well insulated. Southwest Washington--we have winter here, but not like Minnesota.

My main heaters are huge, ancient electric baseboards, and they always roast me out of my bedroom. To run one of these panels 24/7 here cost me about $25/month. So when it's cold, I just keep this thing going in my bedroom most of the time, and it does a decent job of making the room comfortable. If we get an unusually cold spell I might turn on the baseboard, but ordinarily this panel does a good job. If you have huge rooms, you might need more than one of these.

My panels just have an on/off switch on the cord; I haven't bothered to figure out the thermostat thing. Depending on the weather, I'll shut it off for a few hours if it gets too warm.

The panel gets warm to the touch, but it won't burn you unless maybe you pass out drunk leaning up against it with no shirt on. All bets are off then.

I should mention that both my panels have cracks running through them. They still work fine, but anybody with a lick of sense would probably replace them. I suspect that this issue may be resolved with the newer panels, but I can't say for sure. I bought two more last time I saw them on Woot, but I haven't gotten around to replacing them yet.

Fun Fact: You can paint these w/acrylic house paint to match your walls, or expertly forge a Picasso masterpiece to impress your friends.

catgrrl


quality posts: 9 Private Messages catgrrl
lstaff wrote:Does anyone think this would be useful as a source of heat in a chicken coop?



Not in any chicken coop I've seen. You don't want it anywhere that can get damp or has sketchy electricity.

msrowyredhead


quality posts: 2 Private Messages msrowyredhead

It would be hard to really harm yourself touching these..and I have no issues with my pets.
I DID have a HEL! of a time mounting this on my solid lathe and plaster walls tho.. You really need a hollow wall for easy installation.

catgrrl


quality posts: 9 Private Messages catgrrl
peaceetc wrote:For those who have this unit -- how hot does it get to the touch? I have pets, and I wouldn't want them coming into contact with it and getting injured. Thanks.



It gets warm, but not hot enough to burn. I've got multiple cats, no problems in ten years. In fact, if you have a short-haired, heat-seeking kitty, you could set up a bed or cat tree near it.

wickedgirl


quality posts: 1 Private Messages wickedgirl

Anyone know what amperage they draw?

peaceetc


quality posts: 7 Private Messages peaceetc
catgrrl wrote:It gets warm, but not hot enough to burn. I've got multiple cats, no problems in ten years. In fact, if you have a short-haired, heat-seeking kitty, you could set up a bed or cat tree near it.



Thank you to you and others who answered. I appreciate it.



I've won a lot of bags of crud. Envy me.

johnkalt


quality posts: 0 Private Messages johnkalt
jshagam wrote:Two questions:

1) Does it have a built-in shutoff timer?
2) Does it have a thermostat?

From all of the information I can find about it online, it looks like the answer to both questions is "no." So how does one control the temperature and, ideally, make it automatically shut off after a certain amount of time?





I own 2 of these heaters and am in my 3rd winter, and am likely buying a 3rd now.

Although you can purchase a Digital Thermostat and Timer (http://www.eco-heater.com/digital-thermostat-and-timer/) for the unit (from the Eco heater web site), I use a simple timer outlet (something like $6.99 for 2 at Home Depot), like you would use for turning on/off Christmas lights.

I keep a thermometer in the room, and you have to play with the timer a bit based on the high/low temps, and what the temp is outside.

blueconversechucks


quality posts: 10 Private Messages blueconversechucks

I already have electric heaters in my walls and each have a wall thermostat. Is it possible/would it make sense to replace my wall heaters with these?

badhabit12


quality posts: 14 Private Messages badhabit12
blueconversechucks wrote:I already have electric heaters in my walls and each have a wall thermostat. Is it possible/would it make sense to replace my wall heaters with these?



This unit is for adding additional heat to a chilly room. Think of it as an electric blanket. It supplements your existing system, it does not replace it.




RogerB


quality posts: 4 Private Messages RogerB

No Mohu Leaf wisecracks? I am disappointed.

geo8rge


quality posts: 33 Private Messages geo8rge
wickedgirl wrote:Anyone know what amperage they draw?

Specs say 400 Watts of power.


(Overall signature size was getting large. Recommended signature size is 5k.)

geo8rge


quality posts: 33 Private Messages geo8rge
lstaff wrote:Does anyone think this would be useful as a source of heat in a chicken coop?

It is rated at 400 watts. The problem I have with the wall mounting is it will create a very hot spot on the wall behind it. If the wall is un insulated it will pump heat outside the room it is mounted. IMO you are better off with an oil filled radiator placed 6 inches away from the wall, and having a fan blowing air down form the ceiling.


(Overall signature size was getting large. Recommended signature size is 5k.)

bowlingb


quality posts: 21 Private Messages bowlingb
geo8rge wrote:Specs say 400 Watts of power.



A = P / (V * Pf)
where Pf is a power factor for AC current and is 0.8 for single phase AC.
so 400W / (120V * 0.8) = 4.16A

So call it 4.2 Amps.

ciabelle


quality posts: 16 Private Messages ciabelle
wickedgirl wrote:Anyone know what amperage they draw?


geo8rge wrote:Specs say 400 Watts of power.


So with 110-120VAC household current, we can use Ohms's law (watts/volts = amps) and come up with a result in the ballpark of 3.5 amps.


acanarelli


quality posts: 254 Private Messages acanarelli

I'm considering purchasing a few of these units for my home but need to have a few questions answered by some of you nice people who already own and use them. First of all, I have gas fired, hot water base board heat and wonder it this presents any problem with the possibility of using these units?

Next, should the heating units be fastened to an outside wall or an inside wall? In other words, is it best fastened to an outside wall where baseboard heating elements are already installed or to an inside wall between rooms?

Finally, will ceiling paddle fans assist or hinder the proper operation of these heating units? Thanks in advance for your help!

bowlingb


quality posts: 21 Private Messages bowlingb
ciabelle wrote:So with 110-120VAC household current, we can use Ohms's law (watts/volts = amps) and come up with a result in the ballpark of 3.5 amps.



This is the correct formula for DC, but not for AC. There are additional factors for AC depending on whether it is single phase or three phase for instance. For single phase like most households in the US you have to apply a 0.8 power factor to the AC voltage to get the "equivalent" DC voltage for Ohm's law. This means using 88-96V for the calculation.

schep999


quality posts: 9 Private Messages schep999
bowlingb wrote:This is the correct formula for DC, but not for AC. There are additional factors for AC depending on whether it is single phase or three phase for instance. For single phase like most households in the US you have to apply a 0.8 power factor to the AC voltage to get the "equivalent" DC voltage for Ohm's law. This means using 88-96V for the calculation.


Thanks, your clarification resolved the high school DC calculated difference with AC. Your quality post number deserves to go up 10%.

mm9135


quality posts: 1 Private Messages mm9135
bowlingb wrote:A = P / (V * Pf)
where Pf is a power factor for AC current and is 0.8 for single phase AC.
so 400W / (120V * 0.8) = 4.16A

So call it 4.2 Amps.



This is pure resistance heat there is no power factor. 3.3 amps would be more correct.

lroller


quality posts: 15 Private Messages lroller

I've been long intrigued by the design of these. Permanently mounted, out of the way and can be painted for more obscurity. If I didn't already have enough heaters I'd spring for these. As it is, my Vornado's bought in previous Woots are still going strong, albeit one developed a control panel malfunction that Vornado repaired under warranty including the two way shipping.

mm9135


quality posts: 1 Private Messages mm9135
bowlingb wrote:This is the correct formula for DC, but not for AC. There are additional factors for AC depending on whether it is single phase or three phase for instance. For single phase like most households in the US you have to apply a 0.8 power factor to the AC voltage to get the "equivalent" DC voltage for Ohm's law. This means using 88-96V for the calculation.


You are mixing up power factor with RMS. 120 volts is the RMS value of the USA line voltage. Actual peak voltage is 155. The RMS value (120) is the same as the DC potential and since it is resistive heat there is no power factor. 3.3 amps is more correct.

mm9135


quality posts: 1 Private Messages mm9135
lstaff wrote:Does anyone think this would be useful as a source of heat in a chicken coop?



It depends on how you like your chicken, grilled or baked. :-)

nhf1cjc


quality posts: 1 Private Messages nhf1cjc

Have a small walk-in closet that has no insulation and very cold in the winter. Would this be too much heat to place it inside closet?

tedkaz


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tedkaz

I have two of these already, but the ones I purchased say "Proudly Made in South Africa" on them, I see the info on these says Made in China. Can anyone verify where these where made? Would like another pair but I want to get exactly what I already have.

http://www.amazon.com/Econo-Heat-0603-E-Heater-White/dp/B005DKN20W#productDetails

awschroader


quality posts: 1 Private Messages awschroader
geo8rge wrote:It is rated at 400 watts. The problem I have with the wall mounting is it will create a very hot spot on the wall behind it. If the wall is un insulated it will pump heat outside the room it is mounted. IMO you are better off with an oil filled radiator placed 6 inches away from the wall, and having a fan blowing air down form the ceiling.



Thats easy, put it on an interior wall. That way any heat that 'leaks' through the wall will help heat another room rather thn waste it.

bendandpeel


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bendandpeel
wootaddict wrote:...this unit costs $76.98 on Amazon. A whole $12.95 (after tax) in savings--big whoop!



That's a 22% discount. Besides, $12.95 is $12.95, enough for a nice lunch.

muffingirl14


quality posts: 1 Private Messages muffingirl14

I purchased this 'wall heater.' I like it. It does what woot said. It is excellent for a smaller room or a room with quite a bit of furniture so that it can be placed on the wall rather than take up space on the floor. A good buy.