WootBot


quality posts: 15 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Poll: Does it matter to you if a product is made in America?
  • 29.3% - Yes! Big time! 738
  • 31.4% - Yeah, sorta. 791
  • 18.6% - Only a little, as in I'll pay a little more for it. 469
  • 12.9% - Not really that much. I'll buy American if it doesn't cost me any extra. 326
  • 7.9% - Nope. Not at all. 199
2523 votes

Well, how do you fare compared to the Zeitgeist? Chat up your fellow wooters and let us know how lame this poll was or what obvious choices we missed. For example: Was this poll a) STUPID, b) DUMB, c) POINTLESS or d) ALL OF THE ABOVE?

conculcate


quality posts: 0 Private Messages conculcate

It used to imply a certain standard of quality. But now that we're manufacturing the same disposable garbage as everybody else, it's a meaningless distinction as far as I'm concerned.

Boredmaster


quality posts: 5 Private Messages Boredmaster

You aren't supposed to buy American primarily because it's supposed to be the cheapest or highest quality. You buy American because you live in America. Helping support Americans is good for America. Helping support China, who purposely builds anti-American ship weapons (DF-21D), purposely puts lead in our children's toys, purposely is responsible for 2317 pieces of sizable space debris from the test involving the destruction of YF-1C. The reasons NOT to buy Chinese, when you can help it, is more than enough to the enlightened. But mostly, it's just the right thing to do, period! The only new car I've ever purchased was a Ford, and I didn't have a single, not ONE, issue before I sold it at 130,000 miles. Both of my Japanese-built cars fell to pieces at 60k miles. Anyways, I'm rambling because I'm passionate about this subject. Seriously though, I find it bothersome that some people don't see why buying American is the right thing to do.

conculcate wrote:It used to imply a certain standard of quality. But now that we're manufacturing the same disposable garbage as everybody else, it's a meaningless distinction as far as I'm concerned.



arends4


quality posts: 0 Private Messages arends4

It's most import to buy local; from the small business. Our Government is sending our jobs overseas, and monopolizing us. (I believe that's the word to sum it up quickly).

revoluciano


quality posts: 0 Private Messages revoluciano

Honestly, the only thing I care about buying American is my car.

strawhousepig


quality posts: 60 Private Messages strawhousepig

Not sure how many government jobs are actually shipped to China, nor how much actual lack of regulation leads to lead paint on toys made there as opposed to an underhanded plot, but keeping the money here is best for all of us, regardless of where it may have went otherwise.

strawhousepig


quality posts: 60 Private Messages strawhousepig

myfester


quality posts: 4 Private Messages myfester

I prefer to buy American. I'd rather keep us working. American quality may not always be what it used to be, but I'd like to know that someone is keeping their job with me buying here.

AWildWeed


quality posts: 0 Private Messages AWildWeed

I prefer to buy American because I feel like I'm helping to put my neighbors to work.

I sometimes make it a point when I'm in a store to pick up an item, look to see where it's made, and, out loud, say, "Nope. Not buying 'Made in China'", and then putting the item back. This behavior has caused people to ask me why I don't like "Made in China" ... and gives me the opportunity to educate them on the power of buying American-made items.

I do agree on buying locally made items when possible.

Let's all try to improve our own little corners... start by buying locally, and from there, American-made.

wellIamJake


quality posts: 0 Private Messages wellIamJake

30 years ago it was important, not so much now. It is a global economy so buy for quality of product over location made. Stop buying cheap landfill crap.

Jake

agoristmike


quality posts: 0 Private Messages agoristmike

Yeah, buy american because uh...It helps the american economy to prop up their crappy, expensive businesses as opposed to getting something inexpensive with equal quality! Anyone who thinks 'buying american helps americans' should really look into economics. In the short term? Sure, in the long run? Absolutely not. Isolationism is only good for the few suppliers who are permitted to sell, NOT for the customer.

Accelerator


quality posts: 5 Private Messages Accelerator
Boredmaster wrote:You aren't supposed to buy American primarily because it's supposed to be the cheapest or highest quality. You buy American because you live in America. Helping support Americans is good for America. Helping support China, who purposely builds anti-American ship weapons (DF-21D), purposely puts lead in our children's toys, purposely is responsible for 2317 pieces of sizable space debris from the test involving the destruction of YF-1C. The reasons NOT to buy Chinese, when you can help it, is more than enough to the enlightened. But mostly, it's just the right thing to do, period! The only new car I've ever purchased was a Ford, and I didn't have a single, not ONE, issue before I sold it at 130,000 miles. Both of my Japanese-built cars fell to pieces at 60k miles. Anyways, I'm rambling because I'm passionate about this subject. Seriously though, I find it bothersome that some people don't see why buying American is the right thing to do.



My Honda was made in Marysville, OHIO

My Ford was made in MEXICO.

We live in a global market now. The computer you used to write your comment was NOT made in America. It' very likely your American branded car was not made in America. It possibly was assembled in America but I would bet at least some of the parts were made from manufacturers in Asia or Europe.
By the way, my Toyota, made in Kentucky, has 285000 miles on it. All the service and repair was performed by Americans right here in the good old USA! I'm afraid to say where the replacement parts came from however.
If your car fell apart at 60K, I'm guessing you didn't take care of it properly or, chose a bad American service and repair company to maintain your vehicle.

Please educate yourself first before you mislead others.
Most, if not all, of American brands contract with the lowest bidder to manufacture their product.

If you think LL Bean, Gap, Lands End, etc. have their clothing made by American textiles, you would be wrong. It's not China who makes all of these items. It's Bangledesh, Viet Nam, India, Sri Lanka, and on and on.

It very naive to think your American products are made in America or that you're supporting the American economy by buying only American made products.

Educate yourself and try to buy products that have high quality and made with fair practices by companies who treat employees fairly and who return profits to America.

Oh, and be very careful when you lace up your shoes to go workout. Those shoes were not made in America and quite possibly were made in a sweatshop by children.

wellIamJake


quality posts: 0 Private Messages wellIamJake

These are my cars, three of them I still have.

94 corolla: 240k miles, timing belt, alternator.

02 Jetta wagon: 280k miles, alternator, coil pack, timing belt wheel bearing. Still have stock clutch.

04 ford f150: tranny at 50K, engine at 75k, engine at 140k, half of the electronics in the rig, rear axle, all 4 wheel bearings, 4x4 actuator, cam phasers twice. All this before I sold it with 142k miles. Never again.

07 Chevy Suburban: engine at 60k. Rig has 78k on it. Junk.

Jake

SneezyKevinA


quality posts: 3 Private Messages SneezyKevinA
arends4 wrote:It's most import to buy local; from the small business. Our Government is sending our jobs overseas, and monopolizing us. (I believe that's the word to sum it up quickly).



I do this as well as try to buy American as much as possible. I also own a small business to boot.

Accelerator


quality posts: 5 Private Messages Accelerator
SneezyKevinA wrote:I do this as well as try to buy American as much as possible. I also own a small business to boot.



I totally agree. I utilize locally owned and operated businesses as much as possible. I like mom and pop restaurants, my local dry cleaner business is not a franchise, even though that is not a bad thing in and of itself. I service all of my cars at the local, american owned, business in my community. A local business who pays local taxes and returns their profits to the local economy is a good thing.

I'm a clock and watch enthusiast. Most are Swiss and German made timepieces but all of the servicing and maintenance work is done by my local watch and clock shop who has been in business since the early 1930's. They are a multi-generational family business originating from German immigrants.

I believe it is important to make a distinction from American business and American made products. Our products are often made from sources outside of America but the service and repair of these products are almost exclusively performed by American businesses.

On another subject; our government is NOT sending jobs overseas. This is ridiculous to say. Only in the context that we are free to engage in global enterprise as free people, is the government participating.

The real thought is, freedom is not free. Our government is very expensive to run because of the price of defense, among other things like human rights, ecology and environmental protection, social security, and many other social protections that other countries do not provide to their citizens. If you believe we can downgrade our defensive posture and not be immediately dominated by another government who will insist on controlling everything you do, including where you get the things you need and want to live, then you are delusional.

The free enterprise and capitalistic and entrepreneurial freedom afforded to us and maintained through national defense has lead companies to seek most efficient and profitable means to run their enterprises.The sad fact is, American companies will do everything possible to avoid paying excess taxes to America which erode profit margin.

We are protected under the Constitution to be free and do what we want. It's a double edged sword but I'll choose freedom over oppression any day.

DarthTagnan


quality posts: 2 Private Messages DarthTagnan

My money goes to dependable, affordable products. If it's actually made and assembled in the US, so much the better. However, if corporations want my money, they better have the product to back it up.

bbkf


quality posts: 3 Private Messages bbkf
revoluciano wrote:Honestly, the only thing I care about buying American is my car.



yeah me too.

My Toyota Corolla was made in America, by mexicans.

Oh and don't give me the "well at least when you buy an american car the money stays in america" comment. Because that is total BS. the CEO of Totota pays the same income tax as the CEO of any American Automaker......ZERO!

lroux


quality posts: 2 Private Messages lroux
DarthTagnan wrote:My money goes to dependable, affordable products. If it's actually made and assembled in the US, so much the better. However, if corporations want my money, they better have the product to back it up.



Huzzah. I am a liberal but Unions have put 50% of the cost of American goods into rediculous salaries/retirement benefits so the products are way overpriced. Give me a good product at a fair price and I will buy it. Period. I wont buy crap because my neighbor made it. crap is crap.

Unless it is put into a bag. Then I will fight tooth and nail to try and get it.

tsarmeister


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tsarmeister

Buy American, even if it doesn't work as well. -Hank Hill

thestone


quality posts: 2 Private Messages thestone

I only buy Japanese cars, they'll last practically forever if you take care of them. My Yaris was assembled in Japan from 90% Japanese parts, which I was really surprised to discover.

startanew2


quality posts: 0 Private Messages startanew2

I would like to know what the people who said it didn't matter at all, and the people who said only if it doesn't cost anything extra, do for a living? And maybe where they live?

I hate that we have become such a "me first" society, unconcerned with having jobs for our neighbors and ourselves.

startanew2


quality posts: 0 Private Messages startanew2
wellIamJake wrote:These are my cars, three of them I still have.

94 corolla: 240k miles, timing belt, alternator.

02 Jetta wagon: 280k miles, alternator, coil pack, timing belt wheel bearing. Still have stock clutch.

04 ford f150: tranny at 50K, engine at 75k, engine at 140k, half of the electronics in the rig, rear axle, all 4 wheel bearings, 4x4 actuator, cam phasers twice. All this before I sold it with 142k miles. Never again.

07 Chevy Suburban: engine at 60k. Rig has 78k on it. Junk.




Here:

1988 F150 320,000 miles on it - still starts first time every time. Have owned since 1992, and spent less than $3000 on repairs since then - that's average of $137 a YEAR - and we live in the rust belt.

1997 F250 4 x 4 180,000 miles on it. Daily driver and puller of our 28 foot horse trailer and 24 foot car hauler.

1998 Bonneville, right around 200,000 miles on it (I'd have to look to get closer).

2001 Bonneville, 177,000 miles on it.

2003 Toyota Sequoia 160,000 miles on it. Just got this because we needed something with a third row seat and it was so much cheaper than a Ford or a Chevy of comparable seating. It looks and drives like brand new and the seller said they only offered him $4000 in trade in value for it. Heck, I could probably get $4000 in trade for my 1988 Ford pickup.

startanew2


quality posts: 0 Private Messages startanew2
Accelerator wrote:My Honda was made in Marysville, OHIO

My Ford was made in MEXICO.

We live in a global market now. The computer you used to write your comment was NOT made in America. It' very likely your American branded car was not made in America. It possibly was assembled in America but I would bet at least some of the parts were made from manufacturers in Asia or Europe.
By the way, my Toyota, made in Kentucky, has 285000 miles on it. All the service and repair was performed by Americans right here in the good old USA! I'm afraid to say where the replacement parts came from however.
If your car fell apart at 60K, I'm guessing you didn't take care of it properly or, chose a bad American service and repair company to maintain your vehicle.

Please educate yourself first before you mislead others.
Most, if not all, of American brands contract with the lowest bidder to manufacture their product.

If you think LL Bean, Gap, Lands End, etc. have their clothing made by American textiles, you would be wrong. It's not China who makes all of these items. It's Bangledesh, Viet Nam, India, Sri Lanka, and on and on.

It very naive to think your American products are made in America or that you're supporting the American economy by buying only American made products.

Educate yourself and try to buy products that have high quality and made with fair practices by companies who treat employees fairly and who return profits to America.

Oh, and be very careful when you lace up your shoes to go workout. Those shoes were not made in America and quite possibly were made in a sweatshop by children.



No. They are Red Wing, and they were made here. Not only are they way better for your feet, but they are much better made.

conculcate


quality posts: 0 Private Messages conculcate

What y'all call local pride, I call xenophobia.

Accelerator


quality posts: 5 Private Messages Accelerator
startanew2 wrote:No. They are Red Wing, and they were made here. Not only are they way better for your feet, but they are much better made.



Red Wing also manufactures shoes under other brands; Vasque, Carhartt. These shoes are made in the Peoples Republic of China

PensiveTM


quality posts: 1 Private Messages PensiveTM

Buy locally, vote regionally, contemplate globally.

/B/Pensive™/-B/
Constantly contemplating Life, the Universe, and Everything.