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quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

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Teeter Blemished EP-560 Inversion Table

Speed to First Woot:
8m 47.224s
First Sucker:
brian001
Last Wooter to Woot:
drummerdshea
Last Purchase:
3 months ago
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Quality Posts


lichme


quality posts: 2772 Private Messages lichme

wootstalkerbot


quality posts: 10 Private Messages wootstalkerbot

[Preview 1][Preview 2][Preview 3][Preview 4][Preview 5]


Teeter Blemished EP-560 Inversion Table
Price: $229.99
Shipping Options: $5 Standard
Shipping Estimates: Ships in 3-5 business days (Wednesday, Jun 11 to Monday, Jun 16) + transit
Condition: Blemished

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bmrbill


quality posts: 134 Private Messages bmrbill

Some Amazon Reviews.

Interesting review here .

conanthelibrarian


quality posts: 3360 Private Messages conanthelibrarian

Check out these comments from when this was offered in February and great reviews over at costco.com


techkyle


quality posts: 2 Private Messages techkyle

My grandfather has one. I've tried it a few times and it's given me not much more than slight discomfort and a rush of blood to the head, although it's kind of fun to play on. My grandfather found it terribly uncomfortable at first, but thinks it's helping him with some pains he's been having.
My chiropractor has one too. He says he used to feel more energized after he's hung on it, but that recently, he hasn't noticed an effect.
The manufacturer has a few accessories, some included and some sold separately, some of which I found to be gimmicky, such as the "Acupressure Nodes & Lumbar Bridge". They seem to work off the idea that stubbing your toe will make you forget about your headache.

The contraption itself seems sturdy. The plastic tends to discolor white-ish when bent, like those kinds of plastics do, but doesn't feel like it's about to give way. Besides the plastic back rest (which does feel sturdy, but of lower quality), the rest of it seems to have a decently good build quality to it. The pivot points especially latch in quite securely, the welds seem well done, and overall, I feel some decent attention to quality went in to its construction.

If, like my grandfather, you're not the flexible type, I highly suggest tying a rope around the ankle clamp release thing. It works quite well if you don't flex well enough to reach near your ankles. I tied the other end to the square support bar that runs up the back so it would always be in reach (right about knee level).

Be prepared for other people, young and old, to become curious and want to try it. It'll be one of those "Oh, I've heard about those!" things for them.

Additionally, when you first set it up, make sure to have a second person nearby (to potentially rescue you) while you adjust the height of the foot/ankle support. Adjusting the height changes the balance. You'll want the board to go back upright when you lift your chest up slightly.

Is it for you? Maybe. As with anything, I recommend researching the subject before purchasing. (Or buy it on a whim like my grandfather did. I won't judge. :P)

jjessop


quality posts: 2 Private Messages jjessop

Got one last time on Woot and really like it. Not tough to assemble, shipped well and looks to be high quality.

I have had some compression issues (getting shorter) and bad sciatica pain recently. After some research I found good evidence inversion would help and in a desperate act took the chance. So far so good, real good, pain is gone and I really feel better with each use. It does take some adjusting to balance just right but I have to give it a solid review based upon my brief time with it.

commiebastard


quality posts: 0 Private Messages commiebastard

I've never seen an article of furniture that had zits before.

bassyb


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bassyb

I use mine for decompression and a few inverted sit ups. Like all exercise equipment, works only if you use it.

siddartha999


quality posts: 0 Private Messages siddartha999
jjessop wrote:Got one last time on Woot and really like it. Not tough to assemble, shipped well and looks to be high quality.

I have had some compression issues (getting shorter) and bad sciatica pain recently. After some research I found good evidence inversion would help and in a desperate act took the chance. So far so good, real good, pain is gone and I really feel better with each use. It does take some adjusting to balance just right but I have to give it a solid review based upon my brief time with it.



Many many thanks for this reqiew that doesn't center on "it's odd" kind of information... my pain is savage [even by earth standards] and i'm looking for anything to give the medications & exercise & meditation & cannabis the best possible traction since I've been on this elemental trail type o' thing for almost 30 years. Still here, still getting good treatment for the Intractable elements of the pain and NO SURGERY.

Regards,
William D. Wilkerson

The flesh is a trap & Magic sets you free!

SputnikHQ


quality posts: 8 Private Messages SputnikHQ

There is a new Lost Boys III out on video/Netflix where these fitness kids take over a gym in a rural California town and are actually vampires and they sleep on these. Pretty sturdy looking in movie.

Word 2 ya mutha'

parahaps


quality posts: 0 Private Messages parahaps
SputnikHQ wrote:There is a new Lost Boys III out on video/Netflix where these fitness kids take over a gym in a rural California town and are actually vampires and they sleep on these. Pretty sturdy looking in movie.



This has not convinced me to buy this table, but now I want to watch this movie.

crosimoto


quality posts: 0 Private Messages crosimoto
siddartha999 wrote:Many many thanks for this reqiew that doesn't center on "it's odd" kind of information... my pain is savage [even by earth standards] and i'm looking for anything to give the medications & exercise & meditation & cannabis the best possible traction since I've been on this elemental trail type o' thing for almost 30 years. Still here, still getting good treatment for the Intractable elements of the pain and NO SURGERY.

Regards,
William D. Wilkerson



That you Bill? Hi from VA!

bunnykins


quality posts: 10 Private Messages bunnykins

I got one the last time it was on woot and I love it. I had back pain before getting it and now I have no more back pain.

vulcand3


quality posts: 4 Private Messages vulcand3

I have just recently (in the past two weeks) tried this same model a friend of mine has. I am a truck driver for the last 35 years and feel much relief from lower back/hip pain after using. It does hurt the ankles a bit but I am sure after I get more familiar with it I will get better foot placement and improve this. The unit is rated for 300 lbs, I'm right there and this unit handled me fine, no creaks or groans. Very solid. I'm a little disappointed in woots discount as you can buy this from the manufacturers website for $265 with all accessories included,free shipping and no sales tax.

Freedom1955


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Freedom1955

People with acid reflux will love this item.

Catbird


quality posts: 4 Private Messages Catbird

Serious question...

Some people (like me) tend to become nauseated when they are positioned with their heads below the rest of their bodies.

Has this been an issue for anyone?

the1brian


quality posts: 0 Private Messages the1brian

This one is Blemished, but the same price as the last Woot Sale that was New. Kind of disappointing.

dliidlii


quality posts: 33 Private Messages dliidlii

Over priced. There are other brands of equal quality available for $100 less. You pay a premium for this one to cover their advertising expenses and higher profit margins.

mdickinson


quality posts: 10 Private Messages mdickinson

I bought a Teeter inversion table (a similar model, SR-350) from woot two months ago, and have used it a couple times a week since then.

It seems to have relieved my back pain. (In the past, any time I am sitting in a car or plane for too many hours, my back would hurt, and I would end up going to a chiropractor when it got bad enough.)

The model I bought from woot was only $179. http://sport.woot.com/offers/teeter-sr-350-inversion-table-2
I guess the model on sale today is supposed to be "better," though I can't imagine why the plastic backboard of this one would be worth paying more for than the wooden backboard on mine. And mine was new, not "blemished."

If you have back pain that requires treatment every month or two, my experience indicates that a Teeter will pay for itself in very short order - even this one, which is more expensive than the model I bought.

For those wondering about possible discomfort while hanging upside down: It is not necessary to hang with your head straight down to get benefits from this. It allows you to control very easily the angle that you are at, and I find that even just a 30 degree incline works well (and doesn't cause the head rush that you may get at steeper angles.)

I like to start flat and gradually increase the incline over a period of a few minutes. I go all the way to vertical, stay there for a few moments, then spend 5 or 10 min at 30 degrees. It's relaxing, not uncomfortable, and has kept me pain free so far.

The only con to my Teeter is that it is big/bulky. It's not like you can fold it flat and slide it under the bed. You'll need room in the basement or bedroom or someplace to keep this thing out of sight.

mr88talent


quality posts: 1 Private Messages mr88talent

Anyone with Glaucoma, or those that have had a stroke in the past should realize that inversion therapy in general may not be a good idea. http://www.ehow.com/facts_5021764_negative-effects-inversion-therapy.html#ixzz1ZlPIMYJC

mdickinson


quality posts: 10 Private Messages mdickinson
bmrbill wrote:Interesting review here .


The interesting thing about that web site, inversiontablereviewscentral.com , is that it turns out to be just a thinly disguised advertisement for this model.

At first glance, the site appears to be a place for impartial reviews of inversion tables. But delve into it and you'll find a bunch of red flags:


  • There is no identifying information for the author, just a stock photo of some generic looking guy.
  • The whole site contains just stock photos, no photos taken at home by the supposed author.
  • The domain is registered privately, so you can't discover what company is behind it.
  • Then notice the prominently featured "special deal on this model" which appears in several places...
  • and then I realized there is only half a review for any competing model! The truth becomes clear...


Yuck. I hate advertising masquerading as impartial commentary!

SerialBeggar


quality posts: 4 Private Messages SerialBeggar
Catbird wrote:Serious question...

Some people (like me) tend to become nauseated when they are positioned with their heads below the rest of their bodies.

Has this been an issue for anyone?



I got the SR-350 model (with the padded wood backboard) from the previous offering.

Normally, I too would get dizzy and queasy if I let blood rush to my head. After some trial and error, what I've been doing is to not flip over or flip back quickly. Yeah, obvious, :P

I start by putting my elbows out and that gets me to horizontal (based on my balance setting) where I stay for 10-15 secs to let my blood settle. Then I'll slowly lift my forearms to slowly tilt myself back to about 45 degrees where I'll pause for a bit again. Then, I'll lift my arms the rest of the way until I can grab the table's back leg's hump. When I'm done, I raise myself to horizontal and rest there for bit to settle my blood before slowly lowering the rest of the way down. I'll rest again for a bit in the start position before bending my knees to lower myself (instead of just bending over) to release the ankle clamps.

tailings


quality posts: 2 Private Messages tailings

I've suffered from occasional debilitating lower back pain for the past 20 years. I purchased one of these table from Woot! about a year ago.

The build quality is very good. Assembly is moderately easy, though does require a little strength and coordination to get the table mounts set in the frame.

The table delivers what it promises. In the past I've suffered a bought of lower back pain, (slipped disc), perhaps once or twice a year, on average. Extreme discomfort, often incapacitating. Using the table, I've been able to alleviate the pressure on the disc and greatly minimize the pain as well as shorten the duration of the episode. Any time I feel the slightest hint of lower back stiffness or discomfort, I get in the table. And in that time, (the past 14 months), I have yet to have the pain become unbearable and incapacitating.

Three caveats:
1. This is a "Big Thing". Technically it can be folded into a storage position, making it a flat "Big Thing", but the steps required are not convenient to make it fast and easy. If you use this often you'll want to keep it open and ready to use, which does require a pretty sizable footprint, perhaps 15-20 sq ft.
2. The height adjustment, on my model at least, is a little tricky to adjust. You need to apply not inconsiderable force to pull the pin, while applying not inconsiderable force at right angles to slide the height bar, all while stabilizing the whole unit from sliding around. This last bit can be tricky as your two arms are committed to the first two tasks. In short, it's a bit of nuisance if two people of different heights are using the table on a regular basis.
3. Someone above mentioned ankle discomfort. My model allows the foot pedal to be rotated 180 degrees, which alters the relative distance between foot pedal and ankle support. I was having foot discomfort until I discovered that the foot pedal could be adjusted. That said, there is a lot of weight and pressure being applied to the feet and ankles. Well padded shoes and/or heavy socks may be needed for comfort.

EvilGnome


quality posts: 0 Private Messages EvilGnome
dliidlii wrote:Over priced. There are other brands of equal quality available for $100 less. You pay a premium for this one to cover their advertising expenses and higher profit margins.



This is what I was thinking. I've been shopping for an inversion table. Locally, they are $100-$300, but generally I can find no fault in the $150 models. I can't see what this has to make it worth an extra $100 (for a blemished model no less).

irishhurler


quality posts: 0 Private Messages irishhurler

I'm happy with the product although getting in and out of it isn't quite as easy as they say. I suggest using the strap so that you don't go completely upside down unless you have someone there with you. If you're overweight you might have a hell of a time getting right side up until you get the whole height / balance thing down. That being said, it's not a miracle cure for a bulging disc, but it does take pressure off.

irishhurler


quality posts: 0 Private Messages irishhurler
EvilGnome wrote:This is what I was thinking. I've been shopping for an inversion table. Locally, they are $100-$300, but generally I can find no fault in the $150 models. I can't see what this has to make it worth an extra $100 (for a blemished model no less).



You get what you pay for. This is a good model. Pay a little, get less. If you cheap out, you deserve a worthless product. You'll be happy with this one. I am.

khalidmiri


quality posts: 1 Private Messages khalidmiri

From their website, don't use this product if you have:

Anti-Coagulants (Use of): Blood-thinning drugs or aspirin to reduce clotting of the arteries and blood vessels. The use of anti-coagulants signals people at risk for circulatory problems.

Bone weakness, recent fractures, skeletal implants: Inversion may exacerbate these conditions.

Conjunctivitis - (Pink eye): An inflammation of the transparent membrane that covers the front surface of the eyeball and the inner surface of the eyelids caused by bacterial or viral infection.

Glaucoma: A condition of elevated pressure within the eye because of an obstruction of the outflow of the clear, watery fluid circulating in the chambers of the eye. The resulting pressure (which is imperceptible without an eye exam) kills cells in the optic nerve, which can lead to a gradual loss of vision.

Heart / circulatory disorders: Any condition involving the circulatory system.

Hiatal hernia, ventral hernia: A hiatal hernia occurs when intra-abdominal pressure increases cause a portion of the stomach to move into the chest cavity through a weakness in the diaphragm. A ventral hernia develops at the site of previous surgery, usually along vertical incisions. It may also result from weakness in the abdominal wall.

High blood pressure, hypertension: A common disorder in which the heart is pumping blood through the circulatory system with a force greater than that required for normal blood flow. An elevated blood pressure which exceeds 140/90.

Middle ear infection: The middle ear helps equalize air pressure in the ear. A person may feel discomfort or disorientation during inversion.

Obesity (extreme): In some people obesity can be associated with the undetected onset of many of the circulatory and eye problems mentioned above. The weight capacity of each of the inversion products should not be exceeded.

Pregnancy: Pregnant women should exercise caution when inverting.

Retinal detachment: A separation of the retina, the thin, delicate membrane covering the rear portion of the eye, from the optic nerve. Usually results from a hole in the retina that allows the vitreous humor fluid to leak. Treatment is almost always surgical. A retinal hemorrhage, in most cases, can heal by itself.

Spinal injury: Any severe spinal cord trauma requires a person to consult their physician before inverting.

Stroke: Occurs when a blood vessel in the neck or brain becomes blocked or when a vessel in the brain bursts open. Symptoms include paralysis, difficulty speaking, memory loss, and impaired thought processes.

Transient ischemic Attack: Often called a "ministroke," a TIA occurs when the blood supply is temporarily interrupted to a part of the brain due to a blockage. Often precedes the onset of a full stroke, and requires immediate action.

hillslug98239


quality posts: 0 Private Messages hillslug98239

I have a different model that does not have the plastic back, so I cannot comment on that design feature.

My Teeter table is very well-designed and sturdily constructed. Given that I'm hanging upside down by my feet, I want to be confident that the thing isn't going to fail without warning. I've been using it for over a year. I love it. There are times that nothing else will relax my back like this will.

We are not designed to hang upside down, so it takes some getting used to. FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS. Don't hop onto the table and immediately try full inversion. You get a lot of benefit at milder angles.

The warnings about who shouldn't use an inversion table are extremely cautious. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. He or she is likely to tell you to ease in, which is what the manufacturer suggests. I have allergies, so when my sinuses are achy I'm highly unlikely to hang upside down. And yes, I feel pressure in my sinuses when inverted. But it only takes a few minutes of inversion to improve blood flow to the spine and help drain the legs.

Bottom line: You get what you pay for. Don't be afraid to try something new, but be cautious. And use your brain.

whatsupchuck


quality posts: 0 Private Messages whatsupchuck

I don't have this one, but I bought an inversion table some 30 years ago when they first came out to help with some lower back issues. It was helpful in that regard. They were called "backswings" at the time.

As stated by others, take your time and slowly get used to inverting yourself because the rush of blood to your head is not comfortable at first. The most important part of the bed is where it grabs your ankles, that can get to be uncomfortable too if it isn't designed properly. For me, mid-top shoes and thick socks helped a lot. Make sure you're within the height and weight capacity range of the equipment.

All that having been said, the list price on this bed seems awfully steep. The selling price here is is about what it's really worth.

rcordosi


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rcordosi
dliidlii wrote:Over priced. There are other brands of equal quality available for $100 less. You pay a premium for this one to cover their advertising expenses and higher profit margins.



For one, you get great customer service. Have one and somehow, my wife managed to break the spring on the adjustment knob after we had it for about 6 months. Contacted teeter and no questions asked they didn't send just a new spring, but an entire ankle assembly. Another reason is the build quality. These are built to far exceed their weight ratings. I'm pretty sure we will have this thing for the rest of our lives. After over a year of regular daily use, it shows no signs of wear whatsoever. Well worth the extra $100 IMHO.

rcordosi


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rcordosi
rcordosi wrote:For one, you get great customer service. Have one and somehow, my wife managed to break the spring on the adjustment knob after we had it for about 6 months. Contacted teeter and no questions asked they didn't send just a new spring, but an entire ankle assembly. Another reason is the build quality. These are built to far exceed their weight ratings. I'm pretty sure we will have this thing for the rest of our lives. After over a year of regular daily use, it shows no signs of wear whatsoever. Well worth the extra $100 IMHO.



One caveat, I'm 6 ft tall and ended up setting the height adjustment for 6' 3" because you will slide down a bit and the ankles cushions will compress some when you are inverted. other than that, we love it.

rcordosi


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rcordosi
rcordosi wrote:One caveat, I'm 6 ft tall and ended up setting the height adjustment for 6' 3" because you will slide down a bit and the ankles cushions will compress some when you are inverted. other than that, we love it.



More support for the extra $100. 1 minute into the video, see the comparisons against other manufacturers.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kt-261RBZgc#t=119

teeterhangups


quality posts: 15 Private Messages teeterhangups

FYI - you can fold your table. (to 20" x 28.75" x 66") http://teeter-inversion.com/core/media/media.nl?id=579427&c=1309134&h=30b33b45cb97af6b4357

mdickinson wrote:I bought a Teeter inversion table (a similar model, SR-350) from woot two months ago, and have used it a couple times a week since then.

It seems to have relieved my back pain. (In the past, any time I am sitting in a car or plane for too many hours, my back would hurt, and I would end up going to a chiropractor when it got bad enough.)

The model I bought from woot was only $179. http://sport.woot.com/offers/teeter-sr-350-inversion-table-2
I guess the model on sale today is supposed to be "better," though I can't imagine why the plastic backboard of this one would be worth paying more for than the wooden backboard on mine. And mine was new, not "blemished."

If you have back pain that requires treatment every month or two, my experience indicates that a Teeter will pay for itself in very short order - even this one, which is more expensive than the model I bought.

For those wondering about possible discomfort while hanging upside down: It is not necessary to hang with your head straight down to get benefits from this. It allows you to control very easily the angle that you are at, and I find that even just a 30 degree incline works well (and doesn't cause the head rush that you may get at steeper angles.)

I like to start flat and gradually increase the incline over a period of a few minutes. I go all the way to vertical, stay there for a few moments, then spend 5 or 10 min at 30 degrees. It's relaxing, not uncomfortable, and has kept me pain free so far.

The only con to my Teeter is that it is big/bulky. It's not like you can fold it flat and slide it under the bed. You'll need room in the basement or bedroom or someplace to keep this thing out of sight.



teeterhangups


quality posts: 15 Private Messages teeterhangups

Folding is pretty easy - here's a video tutorial: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kU4AkvA4QE


tailings wrote:I've suffered from occasional debilitating lower back pain for the past 20 years. I purchased one of these table from Woot! about a year ago.

The build quality is very good. Assembly is moderately easy, though does require a little strength and coordination to get the table mounts set in the frame.

The table delivers what it promises. In the past I've suffered a bought of lower back pain, (slipped disc), perhaps once or twice a year, on average. Extreme discomfort, often incapacitating. Using the table, I've been able to alleviate the pressure on the disc and greatly minimize the pain as well as shorten the duration of the episode. Any time I feel the slightest hint of lower back stiffness or discomfort, I get in the table. And in that time, (the past 14 months), I have yet to have the pain become unbearable and incapacitating.

Three caveats:
1. This is a "Big Thing". Technically it can be folded into a storage position, making it a flat "Big Thing", but the steps required are not convenient to make it fast and easy. If you use this often you'll want to keep it open and ready to use, which does require a pretty sizable footprint, perhaps 15-20 sq ft.
2. The height adjustment, on my model at least, is a little tricky to adjust. You need to apply not inconsiderable force to pull the pin, while applying not inconsiderable force at right angles to slide the height bar, all while stabilizing the whole unit from sliding around. This last bit can be tricky as your two arms are committed to the first two tasks. In short, it's a bit of nuisance if two people of different heights are using the table on a regular basis.
3. Someone above mentioned ankle discomfort. My model allows the foot pedal to be rotated 180 degrees, which alters the relative distance between foot pedal and ankle support. I was having foot discomfort until I discovered that the foot pedal could be adjusted. That said, there is a lot of weight and pressure being applied to the feet and ankles. Well padded shoes and/or heavy socks may be needed for comfort.



teeterhangups


quality posts: 15 Private Messages teeterhangups

Keep in mind, having a listed contraindication doesn't necessarily mean you can't invert, it's just a good idea to check with your doctor first.

khalidmiri wrote:From their website, don't use this product if you have:

Anti-Coagulants (Use of): Blood-thinning drugs or aspirin to reduce clotting of the arteries and blood vessels. The use of anti-coagulants signals people at risk for circulatory problems.

Bone weakness, recent fractures, skeletal implants: Inversion may exacerbate these conditions.

Conjunctivitis - (Pink eye): An inflammation of the transparent membrane that covers the front surface of the eyeball and the inner surface of the eyelids caused by bacterial or viral infection.

Glaucoma: A condition of elevated pressure within the eye because of an obstruction of the outflow of the clear, watery fluid circulating in the chambers of the eye. The resulting pressure (which is imperceptible without an eye exam) kills cells in the optic nerve, which can lead to a gradual loss of vision.

Heart / circulatory disorders: Any condition involving the circulatory system.

Hiatal hernia, ventral hernia: A hiatal hernia occurs when intra-abdominal pressure increases cause a portion of the stomach to move into the chest cavity through a weakness in the diaphragm. A ventral hernia develops at the site of previous surgery, usually along vertical incisions. It may also result from weakness in the abdominal wall.

High blood pressure, hypertension: A common disorder in which the heart is pumping blood through the circulatory system with a force greater than that required for normal blood flow. An elevated blood pressure which exceeds 140/90.

Middle ear infection: The middle ear helps equalize air pressure in the ear. A person may feel discomfort or disorientation during inversion.

Obesity (extreme): In some people obesity can be associated with the undetected onset of many of the circulatory and eye problems mentioned above. The weight capacity of each of the inversion products should not be exceeded.

Pregnancy: Pregnant women should exercise caution when inverting.

Retinal detachment: A separation of the retina, the thin, delicate membrane covering the rear portion of the eye, from the optic nerve. Usually results from a hole in the retina that allows the vitreous humor fluid to leak. Treatment is almost always surgical. A retinal hemorrhage, in most cases, can heal by itself.

Spinal injury: Any severe spinal cord trauma requires a person to consult their physician before inverting.

Stroke: Occurs when a blood vessel in the neck or brain becomes blocked or when a vessel in the brain bursts open. Symptoms include paralysis, difficulty speaking, memory loss, and impaired thought processes.

Transient ischemic Attack: Often called a "ministroke," a TIA occurs when the blood supply is temporarily interrupted to a part of the brain due to a blockage. Often precedes the onset of a full stroke, and requires immediate action.



tscottme


quality posts: 7 Private Messages tscottme

These inversion tables do work, no doubt about it. Ignore the pics of very fit people almost vertical. These come with a strap that you can use to limit the travel of the table. You will likely want to set the strap so table only "flips over" to a little less than horizontal. The less fit/young you are the more important it is that you work up to being upside down.

If you have sufficient shoulder/arm/hand strength you can get nearly all the benefit of these tables from using a chin-up bar in a doorway. Stretching your spine works whether you stretch from the shoulders or the ankles. I don't use my inversion table nearly as often as my chin-up bar. I have chronic low-back pain from many hours of sitting. When it gets bad I hang from my chin up bar, with my feet off the ground and relax my back until I feel better.

shumu16


quality posts: 0 Private Messages shumu16

looks like a Budist Monk type contraption.I am staying away...

vulcand3


quality posts: 4 Private Messages vulcand3
EvilGnome wrote:This is what I was thinking. I've been shopping for an inversion table. Locally, they are $100-$300, but generally I can find no fault in the $150 models. I can't see what this has to make it worth an extra $100 (for a blemished model no less).



Perhaps the weight rating? I have shopped for these extensively and found the units that have a lower rate rating to be considerably less expensive. That doesn't work for me since I am just short of 300lbs.

tailings


quality posts: 2 Private Messages tailings
teeterhangups wrote:Folding is pretty easy - here's a video tutorial: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kU4AkvA4QE



Erm, thank you. My table came with the same video, and I did watch it.

I still maintain it is not quite so quick and simple, particularly when you have the strap attached. Strap must be detached, height bar adjusted to minimum setting, frame folded and table rotated through 270(ish) degrees.

Your video very conveniently neglects the strap, and I'd like to point out that if Anthony continues to bend his back over while under load, (as he does when folding the frame), he is going to have legitimate back troubles. I find it necessary to actually step into the frame itself to keep my back upright, close the frame about half way, step out of the frame and close it the rest of the way. I'm sure if I practiced my steps in preparation for an instructional video, I could do it a bit quicker, but as a day to day user, I'm giving you feedback here and now that it's a "Big Thing" and not quite so convenient to store away as suggested. Not as difficult as changing a tire. Not as easy as putting away a coffee cup. About on par with raising and lowering my portable table saw. Fair enough?