Wednesday, July 26

The Debunker: Is Hawaiian Pizza Really Hawaiian?

by Ken Jennings

Since it's July, we're celebrating North America's most important patriotic holiday. Put that watermelon on ice and stock up on fireworks, because Canada Day is here! July 1 celebrates the Constitution Act of 1867 that unified Canada into a single dominion—but have Americans really studied up on our neighbor to the north, or do we take its many accomplishments for granted? Jeopardy!'s Ken Jennings is not Canadian, but he does live just two hours from the border, and is very pale and polite. All month, he's going to be correcting our counterfactual Canadian conjectures, eh?

Is Hawaiian Pizza Really Hawaiian?

read more…

 

Wednesday, July 19

The Debunker: Does Canadian Money Smell Like Maple Syrup?

by Ken Jennings

Since it's July, we're celebrating North America's most important patriotic holiday. Put that watermelon on ice and stock up on fireworks, because Canada Day is here! July 1 celebrates the Constitution Act of 1867 that unified Canada into a single dominion—but have Americans really studied up on our neighbor to the north, or do we take its many accomplishments for granted? Jeopardy!'s Ken Jennings is not Canadian, but he does live just two hours from the border, and is very pale and polite. All month, he's going to be correcting our counterfactual Canadian conjectures, eh?

Does Canadian Money Smell Like Maple Syrup?

read more…

 

Wednesday, July 12

The Debunker: Did Canada Really Burn Down the White House?

by Ken Jennings

Since it's July, we're celebrating North America's most important patriotic holiday. Put that watermelon on ice and stock up on fireworks, because Canada Day is here! July 1 celebrates the Constitution Act of 1867 that unified Canada into a single dominion—but have American really studied up on our neighbor to the north, or do we take its many accomplishments for granted? Jeopardy!'s Ken Jennings is not Canadian, but he does live just two hours from the border, and is very pale and polite. All month, he's going to be correcting our counterfactual Canadian conjectures, eh?

Did Canada Really Burn Down the White House?

From many conversations with Canadians over the years, I get the impression that this little-remembered episode from the War of 1812—a footnote in most American history classes—gets a lot of play in Canadian elementary schools and popular culture. "Yeah, the War of 1812. That's when we burned down your White House, eh?" This was apparently the all-time high-water mark for Canadian military efficiency until January 1992, when Jacques "The Mountie" Rougeau won the WWF Intercontinental championship belt just two days before the Royal Rumble.

read more…

 

Wednesday, July 05

The Debunker: Do Canadians Say "Oot" and "Aboot"?

by Ken Jennings

Since it's July, we're celebrating North America's most important patriotic holiday. Put that watermelon on ice and stock up on fireworks, because Canada Day is here! July 1 celebrates the Constitution Act of 1867 that unified Canada into a single dominion—but have American really studied up on our neighbor to the north, or do we take its many accomplishments for granted? Jeopardy!'s Ken Jennings is not Canadian, but he does live just two hours from the border, and is very pale and polite. All month, he's going to be correcting our counterfactual Canadian conjectures, eh?

Do Canadians Say "Oot" and "Aboot"?

The most common stereotype of Canadian English to American ears, after the omnipresent "eh?", is the idea that Canadians pronounce "out" and "about" with a long 'u' sound. "Let's go oot and get some Tim Hortons, eh? How aboot that?" Even the BBC [http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20150820-why-is-canadian-english-unique] props up this notion, but I always thought it was crazy when I heard it from the mouths of American impressionists. I grew up on a strict diet of Degrassi, and I knew those kids were actually saying something more like "aboat." "Soh-rry, we're just going to hang aboat the hoase."

read more…