Wednesday, July 01

 

Monday, June 29

Music Monday: Happy Birthday Colin Hay

by Scott Lydon


Happy Music Monday! About a year ago Scott was talking with forums emperor Sam Kemmis. Sam had heard a Men At Work song and wanted to know more about the band. Scott said he'd hook Sam up. Scott forgot about that promise until today. And, coincidentally, today is Men At Work lead singer Colin Hay's birthday! You can probably figure out the rest. Let's get to it.

Men At Work - Overkill

 

If you had to pick only one Men At Work song, this is really the one to pick. It was played into the ground and back again and it STILL sounds pretty okay. A nice snapshot of what it was like to turn on the radio by the pool back in 1982. And that last memorable bit is way up high in the stars, too!

 

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Thursday, June 25

 

Wednesday, June 24

 

Tuesday, June 23

The Debunker: Did Deep Throat Tell Woodward and Bernstein to "Follow the Money"?

by Ken Jennings

The most beloved show in television history about daytime drinking, Mad Men, just wrapped up its eight-year run, with Don Draper and his ad-pitching peers marching boldly into the 1970s. For past Mad Men seasons, Ken Jennings of Jeopardy! fame has helped us debunk some persistent myths from the 1950s and the 1960s so we've asked him to keep on truckin' and do us a solid by debunking some "Me Decade" misinformation as well. It turns out that a lot of what we think we know about the seventies is pretty "far out."

The Debunker: Did Deep Throat Tell Woodward and Bernstein to "Follow the Money"?

Aside from Richard Nixon's immortal declaration "I am not a crook," it's probably the most famous quote of the Watergate era. Picture the scene: Bob Woodward in a darkened parking garage, a broken reporter, all his Watergate leads having turned out to be dead ends. There stands his ace in the hole, a highly placed administration source he calls "Deep Throat." "Follow the money!" urges Deep Throat. Woodward and Bernstein begin tracing donations to Nixon's 1972 re-election campaign, and break the story wide open. The three-word phrase has become a watchword of other investigations, both real and fictional, ever since.

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Monday, June 22

Music Monday: Science Songs

by Scott Lydon


Happy Music Monday! On this day in 1633, Galileo recanted his heresy. What's more scientific than admitting your theory was wrong, eh? Scott's gathered five great songs about science. After he's done, see if you can reproduce his results in the comments. Then he'll get tenure maybe!

Big Audio Dynamite - E=MC2

 

Despite the name, this lovely song is about director Nicolas Roeg, not Einstein. Still, it doesn't get more scientific than E=MC2. That's like the "just do it" of science.

More after the jump. See if you can predict what they are from the data you've already collected.

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Wednesday, June 17

 

Tuesday, June 16

The Debunker: Who Screams During the Instrumental Break in "Love Rollercoaster"?

by Ken Jennings

The most beloved show in television history about daytime drinking, Mad Men, just wrapped up its eight-year run, with Don Draper and his ad-pitching peers marching boldly into the 1970s. For past Mad Men seasons, Ken Jennings of Jeopardy! fame has helped us debunk some persistent myths from the 1950s and the 1960s so we've asked him to keep on truckin' and do us a solid by debunking some "Me Decade" misinformation as well. It turns out that a lot of what we think we know about the seventies is pretty "far out."

The Debunker: Who Screams During the Instrumental Break in "Love Rollercoaster"?

"Rollercoaster! Of love!" It's one of the most famous choruses of the early disco era, and one of the signature hits of the Ohio Players, the Dayton-based funk band recently voted as founding members of the R&B Music Hall of Fame. The song was released on their 1975 album Honey and quickly became a million seller.

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Monday, June 15

Music Monday: The Saga Of John

by Scott Lydon


Happy Music Monday! America is full of folk heroes. Pecos Bill. Paul Bunyan. Joey Chestnut. But maybe the greatest folk hero of all was a simple man who kept to himself and saved his co-workers. A man named... Big John.

Jimmy Dean - Big Bad John

 

When Jimmy Dean recorded this song, he had no idea that he was opening the door to a man's life. This one novelty song exploded like Ulysses or Seinfeld, and by the end of the ride, we knew so much about John. What happened in that mine wasn't the end. It was the beginning.

Five songs about John? Oh, yes, oh yes. See you on the other side of the link.

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